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The Bug Nebula

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#1 Augustus

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Posted 01 June 2020 - 09:39 PM

Continuing with my observations of more and more planetaries - last night I spotted the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) with my ED127. It culminates at about 11 degrees here but in that position at my observing site it's obstructed so I saw it at only 8 degrees altitude practically touching a tree. Could only see a little bit of the irregular shape with just 5 inches of aperture but I plan on revisiting!


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#2 Bill Weir

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 10:39 PM

Nice! From my observing location of 48.20 N NGC was 6302 cruises even closer to the horizon. It’s one of my annual targets for new Moon period in June. It’s a battle with late twilight and weather. Since I figured out I could see it I think I’ve only missed it one year since 2007. It’s well worth revisiting with more aperture. Even low to the horizon it shows a great deal of detail.

 

Bill


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#3 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 10:55 PM

It's interesting in a larger scope.  Around here it culminates at 20 degrees and my view to the south is basically free of trees, there are some that reach about 3 degrees elevation.

 

Jon


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#4 chrysalis

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 04:03 AM

I can experience it at about 17° elevation. Number seems to ring a bell but not sure I've ever observed this one. On the list for later this year!!

 

From CdC:

 

NGC 6302         PK 349+1.1        
Constellation: Scorpius
Dimension:   1.2'x  0.5' 
Magnitude: 12.80
Surface Brightness:  9.00
Description:  pB,E pf
Bug or Bipolar Nebula;much flattened figure 8 shape

J2000 RA:  17h13m42.00s   DE:-37°05'60.0"
Date  RA:  17h15m05.03s   DE:-37°07'20.9"


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#5 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 04:41 AM

The Bug Nebula is part of region in the tail of Scorpius that's one of my favorites. It begins with NGC 6231, the northern jewel box and cr16, a large cluster. To the west there's NGC6124 (C75), a larger open cluster, NGC 6153, a mag 10.6 planetary and NGC 6139, a mag 9.0 globular.

 

To the north, up Scorpius's tail, are mu 1 and my 2 Scorpii that point eastwards to the cluster NGC6281, with nearby globular NGC6256 and further eastward to the Bug Nebula. NGC6256 is a mag 11.3 glob that I find difficult, you're looking through the halo of the Milky Way and it's mostly just a faint fuzzy patch.

 

From the Bug Nebula, 2 degrees north east is the CatsPaw nebula. It requires dark skies and a UHC filter but looks much like the paw print of a cat with several glowing regions. From there it's north east to NGC6357, a bright nebula I'm working with Pimus 24 imbedded.

 

From there, it's eastward to M7 and the glories of Sagittarius.

 

Screenshot_20200603-024736.png

 

Jon


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#6 rowdy388

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 10:24 AM

I'm at 43N. The Stinger and Burg Nebula area is about as far south as my sky allows. 

The Northern Jewel Box is poorly named IMO because it lies just off my horizon and

is almost completely washed out. I do get excited this time of year regardless though

because of all the other great stuff in the region.


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#7 btschumy

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 10:28 AM

I've uploaded a video showing the location of the Bug Nebula in the Galaxy.

 

https://youtu.be/lieB7WRKlTY


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#8 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 11:49 AM

I'm at 43N. The Stinger and Burg Nebula area is about as far south as my sky allows. 

The Northern Jewel Box is poorly named IMO because it lies just off my horizon and

is almost completely washed out. I do get excited this time of year regardless though

because of all the other great stuff in the region.

 

I know that region is too far south for northern observers and it not optimal for me.

 

NGC6231 transits at 15° but often does seem like a box of jewels, bright stars of many colors, shimmering, organically dancing slowly in the imperfect seeing.

 

Jon


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#9 payner

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 05:02 PM

The Bug Nebula rises to about 16 degrees for me. It was an awesome site in my then C-14 under moon-free nights. in fact, I consider the C-14 an awesome PN scope, with its aperture yes, but especially coupled with that long focal length of about 3912 mm.


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#10 Astro-Master

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 11:51 PM

I know that region is too far south for northern observers and it not optimal for me.

 

NGC6231 transits at 15° but often does seem like a box of jewels, bright stars of many colors, shimmering, organically dancing slowly in the imperfect seeing.

 

Jon

The open clusters NGC 6231, Collinder 316,Trumpler 24, and the nebulosity from IC 4628 stretching north and north east from NGC 6231 form the False Comet best seen with the naked eye from a dark site.  It stretches about 2 degrees from -42 to -40 degrees and is a beautiful sight to behold!



#11 Bill Weir

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 12:53 AM

I can experience it at about 17° elevation. Number seems to ring a bell but not sure I've ever observed this one. On the list for later this year!!

 

From CdC:

 

NGC 6302         PK 349+1.1        
Constellation: Scorpius
Dimension:   1.2'x  0.5' 
Magnitude: 12.80
Surface Brightness:  9.00
Description:  pB,E pf
Bug or Bipolar Nebula;much flattened figure 8 shape

J2000 RA:  17h13m42.00s   DE:-37°05'60.0"
Date  RA:  17h15m05.03s   DE:-37°07'20.9"

Don’t wait until too late. June is the month it culminates. At my latitude where it’s only about 4.5° above the horizon a little after midnight I need to take advantage of all I can. As it is the scope is horizontal and I’m sitting on the ground. That horizon also include the snow covered peaks of the Olympic Mountains in Washington State across the water from the observatory I use. My pad is in the lower left corner of the image. It’s worth it though as one good year I could make out the extensions on either end with my 12.5”.

 

Bill

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Edited by Bill Weir, 05 June 2020 - 12:59 AM.

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#12 Feidb

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 02:31 PM

I like to catch the bug (great pun) every summer when I think about it. It's an easy pick with my scope and from my location in Las Vegas. Now would be especially great before I get frustrated trying to nail some of the Abells and other more difficult stellar planetaries.

 

However, I've been on a huge dry spell, not having been out since last November at Furnace Creek in Death Valley. I'm having withdrawals.



#13 Starman1

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Posted 06 June 2020 - 04:29 PM

Don’t wait until too late. June is the month it culminates. At my latitude where it’s only about 4.5° above the horizon a little after midnight I need to take advantage of all I can. As it is the scope is horizontal and I’m sitting on the ground. That horizon also include the snow covered peaks of the Olympic Mountains in Washington State across the water from the observatory I use. My pad is in the lower left corner of the image. It’s worth it though as one good year I could make out the extensions on either end with my 12.5”.

 

Bill

?

It culminates at

10pm July 8

11pm June 23

midnight June 8

1am May 23

2am May 8

3am April 23

so it's visible at some time of the night about 6 months a year--maybe a little less that far north.

4am April 7



#14 Starman1

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Posted 06 June 2020 - 04:32 PM

I like to catch the bug (great pun) every summer when I think about it. It's an easy pick with my scope and from my location in Las Vegas. Now would be especially great before I get frustrated trying to nail some of the Abells and other more difficult stellar planetaries.

 

However, I've been on a huge dry spell, not having been out since last November at Furnace Creek in Death Valley. I'm having withdrawals.

I hear you.  I've had one dark sky overnighter since September--in February--and I've been home since early March.

"Withdrawals" is an understatement.bawling.gif


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#15 Bill Weir

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Posted 07 June 2020 - 01:13 AM

Don you are correct about earlier in the year but that’s spring weather and here it’s way iffier. My response was more pointed towards the comment made to observe it “later this year“

Here further north this is my end of June 11:00 pm sky.

 

Bill

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