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Six Multiples on the Evening of May 24 and 25, 2020

art double star equipment eyepieces mount observing report refractor sketching
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#1 mauigazer

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 02:49 AM

I was out in the back yard this past Sunday night/Monday, May 25, 2020 and was able to get six sketches of multiple stars. All are in the AstroLeague Multiple Star Program found here.

I started out the evening after checking the meteoblue web site for Astronomical Seeing Haleakala which showed excellent conditions with the jet stream at <4 meters/second!

 

All were observed with a Burgess 127mm f8 refractor on an iOptron QZ 25 mount.

We kindly asked the next door neighbor to douse his living room and bedroom lights, (he came out and peeked through the eyepiece). I started with Struve 1685, an easy triangle of stars in Coma Berenices. I had observed this system back in April of this year and wanted to confirm the cardinal points and label some of the field stars. I posted the sketch earlier on Ed’s thread, Coma Berenices Doubles here.

 

Struve 1685 in Coma Berenices

I next slewed the scope over to STF 1691 in Ursa Major because I thought the clouds would start to coalesce around the mountaintop behind my townhouse to the west. After trying a couple of EPs, I settled on an Explore Scientific 9mm at 111X, 0.9° FOV. The three stars form a line almost due east and west from the primary; the B component at 18.3”, PA 276°, the C component is further out at 130” to the east, PA 84°. Stella Doppie shows the Lit. here.

 

STF 1691 in Ursa Major
 

Moving over to Draco, I located STFA 25, a nearly equilateral triangle of stars with seven field stars in the FOV. I used an Explore Scientific 18mm EP at 55X, 1.2° FOV for the Low Power view and a Plössl 26mm EP with a 3X Barlow at 116X, 0.7° FOV for the High Power view. The B component is WNW of the A primary at 296°, 179” out; the C component is almost due SW of the primary at 224°, a little closer in at 105”. In the Low Power view I labeled the field stars. Stelle Doppie has the Lit. here.

 

STFA 25 in Draco

I decided to get JC 16 in Crater while it was still pretty high in the sky at about 2200. This system has a slightly golden primary with a light blue B component. Its worthy to note that Stelle Doppie designates the AC components as physical and increasing, here. Maybe the AB pair needs to be observed a few more times over a number of years. I spent about an hour on this one even though I logged only one field star.

 

JC 16 in Crater

Back to CrB to nail the gem of the night, STF 1964, HU 1167. This is quite often observed as a wide double and in the early 20th century with better optics, the two stars were each split into pairs, making them a tough double double for smaller amateur OTAs. I spent over an hour on this system and labeled the field stars in the FOV as well. The CD pair are the toughest to split and I tried with averted vision to pry them apart. The HU 1167 AB pair are orbital as are the STF 1964 CD pair. Stelle Doppie has the Lit. for the whole system under the identifier HU 1167 here.

 

Struve 1964 in Corona Borealis

Lastly, as small puffy white pillows started marching in from the east at almost 0200 in the morning, I slewed back to Draco and observed Struve 2302 consisting of a tight AB pair at 5.7”, 248° with a C component a comfortable 18” away to the west at 278°. I used my trusted 1.25” Plössl 26mm EP with a 3X Barlow at 116X, 0.7° FOV for this one plotting three field stars, one just outside the FOV to the north and just one outside the FOV WSW. You can see the Lit. in Stelle Doppie here.

 

STF 2302 in Draco
 
Looking UP,
S. McG. MauiGazer

 


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#2 flt158

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 08:01 AM

Having recently observed STF 1685, STF 1964 and HU 1167, I am hugely admiring your excellent sketches here, MauiGazer. 

I do very much thank you for all your hard work in providing us with each one. 

 

Best regards from Aubrey. 


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#3 mauigazer

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 06:19 PM

Having recently observed STF 1685, STF 1964 and HU 1167, I am hugely admiring your excellent sketches here, MauiGazer. 

I do very much thank you for all your hard work in providing us with each one. 

 

Best regards from Aubrey. 

Aubrey,

Thank you. I had a great time working on these sketches. Its pretty rare that the WX cooperates here next to the West Maui mountains. I pine for returning to the summit to do some "serious" observing. The STF 1964/HU 1167 is the most difficult! I would love to see any other images or sketches of this very cool double double. Were you able to split the two pairs?

S. McG. 



#4 Bigzmey

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 02:20 PM

Nice sketches Mauigazer, well done! 


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