Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Supernova 2020leu

  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 PhilHoyle

PhilHoyle

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 299
  • Joined: 02 Sep 2006

Posted 03 June 2020 - 09:37 PM

On the evening of May 24, 2020 I decided to try to photograph NGC5317, aka NGC5364.  Knowing that NGC5363 was nearby I tried to see if I could fit both of these galaxies in the FOV of my camera.  (These are both galaxies in eastern Virgo.)  After taking several shots north and south of what I was pretty sure was NGC5317 and not seeing anything else in my DSLR view screen, I gave up and just centered on NGC5317 and started shooting my subs.  The next evening, while reviewing my subs, I noticed that I had indeed captured NGC5363 on one of the sub images taken while moving the FOV around, but it was on the edge of the field and only on one sub-image.  Then, wanting to verify which galaxy is which, I went to the DSS image obtained using Cartes du Ciel software.  I thought to myself, “This should be easy to verify which galaxy is which because one of them has a bright star right next to the nucleus of the galaxy”.  But when I checked the DSS image, neither of them had a bright star next to the nucleus.  My first reaction was great, now I’ll have to study the star fields, figure out which way north is and verify which galaxy is which from the star fields.  Then it hit me that this could be a supernova.  Now this was at about 9 PM on Memorial Day and I had to go to work the next morning.  I knew from checking out the “Transient Name Server” website that before reporting a possible supernova it was highly recommended that you get a second verifying image.  So, I went to the backyard observatory at about 10:45 PM and got 100 15 second subs starting at about 11:15 PM.  (I got to bed at about 12:30 and did make it to work the next morning.)

 

So, here it is Tuesday evening and all my new subs had this “star” right next to the nucleus of NGC5363.  I went to the Transient Name Server website trying to figure out how to report this and ended up sending them an email using the “contact us” button.  The next morning I got a reply suggesting that I make an “official” report, and stating that there had been no previous reports of anything in NGC5363. But I needed to create a logon to do that, which then needed to be approved.  When I came home for lunch, I created my logon and that evening I submitted my report.  (Which, by the way, I have no idea if I did correctly.)

The next day I got an automated email listing my discovery as 2020leu.  However, as far as I know, no one else has yet to confirm the supernova.  These days there are a few professional automated search teams/facilities that find DOZENS of supernovas every day.  Most of these though, are extremely faint, in the range of 19th to 21st magnitude.  It seems that the pros doing the classifications of supernovas are more interested in what is happening in the far off early universe where distance is measured by redshift, not lightyears.

 

So if anyone gets a chance, please try to photograph NGC5363.  I’m beginning to feel like I might as well have reported a flying saucer.  I’d like to hear from you if you are able to catch it before it gets too low in the west at sunset.

 

 

The attached files are the "discovery" image from 5/24 and the one of the "confirmation" images from 5/25.  These are totally unprocessed except to reduce the file size and convert to jpeg format.  The 5/24 image was rotated so that north is up.  NGC5363 is at the very top of the 5/24 image just right of center.

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • SN2020LEU 20200524.jpg
  • SN2020LEU 20200525.jpg

  • Phillip Creed, Scott Mitchell, JoeR and 10 others like this

#2 Dynan

Dynan

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,700
  • Joined: 11 Mar 2018
  • Loc: NOLA

Posted 03 June 2020 - 09:48 PM

Great Catch! Clouds prevent me from assisting you in observation. But GREAT CATCH. I hope you get confirmation ASAP!



#3 44maurer

44maurer

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 879
  • Joined: 12 Jun 2016
  • Loc: Los Angeles, CA

Posted 03 June 2020 - 09:56 PM

That would be so cool!

 

too bad you don’t get to name it, I would name it something really stupid....and here is supernova Fred. (No offense to anyone named Fred, but that would be a weird name)



#4 yzhzhang

yzhzhang

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 792
  • Joined: 13 Dec 2012
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 03 June 2020 - 10:08 PM

Very cool. I'll give it a few shots tonight. I can image for maybe 2 hour or so of that part of the sky. Will report back.


  • sunnyday likes this

#5 sunnyday

sunnyday

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8,106
  • Joined: 23 Sep 2019
  • Loc: Ottawa,Canada

Posted 03 June 2020 - 10:08 PM

good for you, I hope they will see what you saw.
thank you and well done.



#6 imtl

imtl

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 584
  • Joined: 07 Jun 2016

Posted 03 June 2020 - 11:20 PM

I would name the supernova ZWO18316002940716200TV101AP130GTTAK106TSA120TEC140....

 

Why Fred and not Barney?

 

In all seriousness now this is really awesome. Let us know what goes next.

Eyal


  • 44maurer likes this

#7 yzhzhang

yzhzhang

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 792
  • Joined: 13 Dec 2012
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 03 June 2020 - 11:25 PM

Single frame here with just quick stretch. Definitely something there.

 

Will collect more data.

 

What type of confirmation you are looking for?

 

NGC5363.JPG


Edited by yzhzhang, 03 June 2020 - 11:29 PM.

  • kbev likes this

#8 kbev

kbev

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,107
  • Joined: 29 Dec 2010
  • Loc: Far, far east Mesa

Posted 04 June 2020 - 01:47 AM

I won't be able to try to image it for a few days, but in doing a web search I came across an image that seems to show something at the same location: NGC 5363 and NGC 5364 on Astrobin. According to the information the data for the image was acquired between Feb. 23 and Apr. 2 so it may provide confirmation.  

 

Looking at older images as you mentioned there does not appear to be a star at that position.  Hopefully you can get it confirmed and bask in the glory of your discovery!


Edited by kbev, 04 June 2020 - 01:48 AM.


#9 yzhzhang

yzhzhang

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 792
  • Joined: 13 Dec 2012
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 04 June 2020 - 03:02 AM

I collected 17 300s-exposure frames and here is a cropped stack. Also plate-solved and annotated with UCAC3 and USNO-B1 catalogs with stars ranging from 12-18 mag, and to me there is no mentioning of the suspected star. I measured it to be roughly RA:13°56'06.8" and DEC: +05°15'15.7" under J2000. I have the raw images if needed as supplimental materials. I would also email CBAT for this finding.

 

NGC 5363_crop.jpg

 

NGC 5363 Annotated_crop.jpg


  • kbev likes this

#10 Mert

Mert

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,871
  • Joined: 31 Aug 2005
  • Loc: Spain, Pamplona

Posted 04 June 2020 - 05:35 AM

Congratulations on this discovery, must be great to be the first

to spot a new supernova!

 

Stay well,

Mert



#11 shawnhar

shawnhar

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9,452
  • Joined: 25 Jun 2010
  • Loc: Knoxville, TN

Posted 04 June 2020 - 06:32 AM

Very cool! -Weather has turned here or I would try to image it.



#12 AnakChan

AnakChan

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,035
  • Joined: 01 Sep 2014
  • Loc: Oz

Posted 04 June 2020 - 07:13 AM

Big congrats to Phil!

 

I was gonna give it a shot tonight but looks like the weather's iffy for me too.



#13 Helvetios

Helvetios

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 118
  • Joined: 25 Jun 2017

Posted 04 June 2020 - 03:30 PM

According to SkySafari Pro, there is a magnitude 13.0 star called GAIA 3672069907048904704 right near the center of NGC5363 and consistent with your image.

 

Richard


Edited by Helvetios, 04 June 2020 - 03:32 PM.


#14 Helvetios

Helvetios

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 118
  • Joined: 25 Jun 2017

Posted 04 June 2020 - 03:38 PM

Here is the screenshot from SkySafari Pro.

 

Richard

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_7D81FD839B25-1.jpeg


#15 yzhzhang

yzhzhang

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 792
  • Joined: 13 Dec 2012
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 04 June 2020 - 04:11 PM

According to SkySafari Pro, there is a magnitude 13.0 star called GAIA 3672069907048904704 right near the center of NGC5363 and consistent with your image.

 

Richard

Oh... I think you are right...

 

NGC5363 star.JPG



#16 PhilHoyle

PhilHoyle

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 299
  • Joined: 02 Sep 2006

Posted 04 June 2020 - 04:46 PM

These are the images from WIKISKY and DSS:

 

 

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • DSS imagee of NGC5363.gif
  • WikiSkyimage.jpg


#17 PhilHoyle

PhilHoyle

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 299
  • Joined: 02 Sep 2006

Posted 04 June 2020 - 04:51 PM

Helvetios:  Do you know when the GAIA image was taken?  Perhaps it is a variable star or a recurring SN.  Or, if the image was taken recently, it could be the same SN.  Either way, it seems something unusual is going on.



#18 Helvetios

Helvetios

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 118
  • Joined: 25 Jun 2017

Posted 04 June 2020 - 08:27 PM

Helvetios:  Do you know when the GAIA image was taken?  Perhaps it is a variable star or a recurring SN.  Or, if the image was taken recently, it could be the same SN.  Either way, it seems something unusual is going on.

Hello,

 

The GAIA satellite was launched in December 2013. That's all I can infer. Further information would require getting in touch with the GAIA project team in Europe. I suppose it could be a variable star in our galaxy. If it is in NGC 5363, it's incredibly bright as it appears to be comparable to the brightness of the entire galaxy in your image.  SN do not recur.  They are one-time explosions of massive stars.  I don't think a typical recurrent nova in NGC 5363 would get to mag 13 in a galaxy that far away. I would say it is either a variable star in our galaxy, or it is buried in the WIKISKY and DSS images. But the color image you attached does not show a star and there are no diffraction spikes indicative of a star in the monochrome image.  Clearly, another image is warrented!

 

Richard



#19 Helvetios

Helvetios

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 118
  • Joined: 25 Jun 2017

Posted 04 June 2020 - 08:42 PM

If you go look at the images of NGC5363 on Google, you can see several that show a star near near the nucleus. This is one of them.

 

http://kudzu.astr.ua...__________.html

 

Richard


  • dmdouglass likes this

#20 Mika76

Mika76

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 5
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2017

Posted 05 June 2020 - 02:02 AM

Hello,

 

Clearly something is going on here, quite a mystery! I had a quick look at the GAIA 3672069907048904704 entry of this source in Simbad, nothing special noted: http://vizier.u-stra...069907048904704

 

When I searched the simbad database for sources with 2 armins of the exact position of the GAIA coordinates (green cross in image below) I got a list of 5 potential sources, including the galaxy core. Of these one comes really close, the IRAS 13536+0529 source, which is a "far" infrared source published by the IRAS collaboration in 1988. Could maybe be related, a pro astronomer would have to judge that!

 

See my Simbad search here: http://simbad.u-stra...uery&CoordList=

 

In the Simbad one can also check images from an awful many missions and surveys, here: http://cdsportal.u-s...IRAS 13536+0529

 

The survey where I found that the potential source stood out the most is in the "SDSS9 band u" survey, which should be in the UV, see photo below.

 

Mikael

Attached Thumbnails

  • NGC5363sourrce.png
  • SDSS9 band u.png



CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics