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Five Jovian Satelites?

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#26 timokarhula

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Posted 07 June 2020 - 03:41 AM

Strange, Iapetus was the second moon of Saturn (after Titan but before Rhea) that I found with my 60 mm refractor more than 40 years ago.  I verified Iapetus with The Astronomical Ephemeris (the predecessor of The Astronomical Almanac) and I saw the movement of the moon during consecutive nights.  Iapetus is of 10th magnitude in western elongation.  I have also seen Iapetus many times with 20x100 binoculars.  Himalia was a tough jovian moon with my 10-inch Dob when Jupiter was high up for me 10 years ago.

 

/Timo Karhula



#27 Allan Wade

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Posted 07 June 2020 - 03:54 AM

Personally, I don't consider Iapetus to be particularly difficult for me, as it is usually located far from Saturn and is in the range of magnitude 11.9 to 10.2.  Now Mimas, on the other hand, has been a real toughie for me with the rings fully open, as it takes great seeing and good positioning to show up much of the time. I have done it on occasion in my 10 inch, but it is notably easier to pick up in my 14 inch.  Clear skies to you.

Mimas is a good challenge. In the 16” a couple of weeks ago I could see Enceladus and that was my guide to seeing the position of Mimas right next to it. Mimas was winking in and out of view. Mostly out. It’s a real challenge even in the 16”. In the 32” I see it there every time I look.




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