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Looking for telescope help!

Celestron Meade beginner equipment
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#26 sunnyday

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 08:12 PM

you have already received very good advice.
so welcome to CN.


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#27 annnaliese

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 08:13 PM

What's your budget?  How dark are your skies?

Generally speaking, a Newtonian reflector on an alt-azimuth mount, commonly known as a Dob, offers the best "bang for the buck".

https://www.bintel.c...?v=322b26af01d5

There's a list of astronomy vendors in Australia at https://www.asnsw.com/node/738

Thanks so much for the links! My budget isn't limited and I'm in Victoria but im not sure about how 'dark' our skies are...



#28 annnaliese

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 08:13 PM

Taosmath is assuming you will use a Dobson mount, which is short.

 

If you get a chair, you will need one adjustable in height.  An alternative, especially if you travel to a dark site or observe from rough ground where a chair is awkward is a stool to lift your scope to a convenient height,

 

I just built a 3-legged stool which is described at:

https://www.cloudyni...-wdobsom-mount/

 

Have fun!

Thanks for this!



#29 annnaliese

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 08:14 PM

I wonder how much room you have to store it and mode of transportation.

 

Living in a dorm perhaps?

 

Bicycle, bus, small car to get around?

 

Oil or diamond mine heiress? Or more limited budget?

 

Not knowing anything about your situation, I'd likely recommend a small refractor on a photo tripod or light alt/az mount. See some stuff without a large outlay of cash. Easy to store and transport. Little to no maintenance. And no dew management or temperature acclimation to deal with. Beauty in it's simplicity.

I have quite a bit of room in my room and car! Budget is not limited. Thanks for the suggestions!!! 



#30 annnaliese

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 08:15 PM

you have already received very good advice.
so welcome to CN.

Thank you! laugh.gif


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#31 Echolight

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 08:47 PM

Money to burn?

 

I'd get a 3 to 4 inch f/7 apo for something that's a high quality, engineering art, great for solar system and maybe a little more, wide view, fast and easy, grab-n-go.....

 

and... if you want the absolute biggest views from planets to deep space, and see some detail in globular clusters, they tell me the biggest dob you are comfortable moving and setting up. Maybe a 12" portaball?

http://www.mag1instr...taball-12-5-f-5

 

Myself... I started with a yard cannon. 6 inch f/8 achromatic refractor aon a Go-To AVX mount.(and a 200mm SCT) The big achro has it's detractors, but I like it quite a bit.

 

Those other two I suggested above I may add for my viewing pleasure down the road. And maybe... might've been...??...I don't know...but possibly....if I had a do-over...could've started with one of those. But I do especially enjoy the tracking of the AVX mount as stuff moves out of your view fast without tracking.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20200530_191015~2.jpg

Edited by Echolight, 09 June 2020 - 09:06 PM.

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#32 B 26354

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 09:26 PM

Hello! Unfortunately we didn't get any labs this sem due to covid. I will definitely look into a club. I'm in victoria near the city and price is not much a problem if that helps with the questions. I will definitely look into these books thanks heaps!

Here's a light-pollution map (hopefully) of your area (Click on it):

 

Melbourne Area Light Pollution.jpg

 

Go to https://www.lightpollutionmap.info/

 

...and in the upper-right corner, click on the "World Atlas 2015" dropdown, and choose "VIIRS 2019".


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#33 bjulihn

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 09:34 PM

Hi Annaliese;

 

Jumping in again. You mention you don't have sense of how dark your skies are? You will often see the term "Bortle" with a number after it from people in the hobby. They are referring to a common scale of how dark your skies are. A "1" is super dark like out in the remote desert and an "8-9" is downtown in a city. Most suburban areas are a 6-7. And rural areas might be 3-5 depending on how close to a town they are.

 

The reason this is important is that the problem with seeing most deep sky objects (DSO's) is not so much that they are small, but that they are dim. So contrast is very important in how much you can see. Planets are generally small and relatively bright, so you need lots of magnification for them. But the major DSO's (galaxies, globulars, and nebula) are larger and dimmer. For them, you generally use a lower magnification which gives you both a wider field of view and makes them brighter and easier to see. By the way, this is one reason there is no such thing as the perfect telescope. For planet viewing, people are often looking for something with a long focal length so they can get a lot of magnification. For DSO's, people are often looking for as much aperture as possible to gather the most light so they can to see dim targets. For astrophotography, people are looking for a lower focal ratio(f4-6) because it will capture light much more quickly than a higher focal ratio (f8-10) scope. But lower focal ratio does not change what we see when visually observing.

 

If you look up "Bortle scale" you will see examples online. Have fun!


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#34 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 10 June 2020 - 01:11 AM

Thanks so much for the links! My budget isn't limited and I'm in Victoria but im not sure about how 'dark' our skies are...

You're welcome.  You may find some of the information on amateur astronomy and observing in my post (#22) at https://www.cloudyni...mers/?p=5184287 helpful.


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#35 Rakahrd  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 10 June 2020 - 08:38 AM

I was just given a Celestron power seemed 114eq telescope. Do I have to have the mirrors callibrated to use this? I'm so New to the hobby.



#36 annnaliese

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Posted 10 June 2020 - 05:52 PM

Hi Annaliese;

 

Jumping in again. You mention you don't have sense of how dark your skies are? You will often see the term "Bortle" with a number after it from people in the hobby. They are referring to a common scale of how dark your skies are. A "1" is super dark like out in the remote desert and an "8-9" is downtown in a city. Most suburban areas are a 6-7. And rural areas might be 3-5 depending on how close to a town they are.

 

The reason this is important is that the problem with seeing most deep sky objects (DSO's) is not so much that they are small, but that they are dim. So contrast is very important in how much you can see. Planets are generally small and relatively bright, so you need lots of magnification for them. But the major DSO's (galaxies, globulars, and nebula) are larger and dimmer. For them, you generally use a lower magnification which gives you both a wider field of view and makes them brighter and easier to see. By the way, this is one reason there is no such thing as the perfect telescope. For planet viewing, people are often looking for something with a long focal length so they can get a lot of magnification. For DSO's, people are often looking for as much aperture as possible to gather the most light so they can to see dim targets. For astrophotography, people are looking for a lower focal ratio(f4-6) because it will capture light much more quickly than a higher focal ratio (f8-10) scope. But lower focal ratio does not change what we see when visually observing.

 

If you look up "Bortle scale" you will see examples online. Have fun!

This is very helpful thank you!!



#37 annnaliese

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Posted 10 June 2020 - 05:53 PM

Here's a light-pollution map (hopefully) of your area (Click on it):

 

attachicon.gifMelbourne Area Light Pollution.jpg

 

Go to https://www.lightpollutionmap.info/

 

...and in the upper-right corner, click on the "World Atlas 2015" dropdown, and choose "VIIRS 2019".

Thank you!!


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#38 annnaliese

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Posted 10 June 2020 - 05:54 PM

Money to burn?

 

I'd get a 3 to 4 inch f/7 apo for something that's a high quality, engineering art, great for solar system and maybe a little more, wide view, fast and easy, grab-n-go.....

 

and... if you want the absolute biggest views from planets to deep space, and see some detail in globular clusters, they tell me the biggest dob you are comfortable moving and setting up. Maybe a 12" portaball?

http://www.mag1instr...taball-12-5-f-5

 

Myself... I started with a yard cannon. 6 inch f/8 achromatic refractor aon a Go-To AVX mount.(and a 200mm SCT) The big achro has it's detractors, but I like it quite a bit.

 

Those other two I suggested above I may add for my viewing pleasure down the road. And maybe... might've been...??...I don't know...but possibly....if I had a do-over...could've started with one of those. But I do especially enjoy the tracking of the AVX mount as stuff moves out of your view fast without tracking.

Thank you very much for this!




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