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EQ6-R Polar Reticle Alignment Procedure

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6 replies to this topic

#1 KTAZ

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Posted 06 June 2020 - 09:06 AM

Ok, I am ready for the onslaught of those that think this topic is silly.

 

I received my new EQ6-R yesterday and, yes, the reticle on the polar scope is not level in the home position. For those of us with minor OCD, we generally want that reticle to be plumb and level both vertically and horizontally out of the box when in home position. We do not think that is too much to ask for a $1500 mount. Yes, I know that it does not have to be; just rotate the scope in RA until it is and then do my polar alignment. Sorry...I should not have to.

 

I am sure that there are many of us that would like to get this level. I did see an older thread from several years ago that gave some tips, but it was not super specific.

 

Has anybody documented the proper process to rotate that reticle?


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#2 descott12

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Posted 06 June 2020 - 09:40 AM

I just got a new AZ-EQ5 with the optional polar scope and it is completely out of whack also. There are SIX alignment screws, 3 of which are recessed so deep that you can't even tell if the hex key is engaged and the manual simply says "use the six alignment screws to calibrate the scope". Pretty pathetic.  I have failed miserably so I have purchased a guide scope and camera and will use SharpCap to polar align.

 

Glad I spent the $100 on this polar scope... I guess I will just sell it...I am sure somebody already knows how to use it.


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#3 Robindonne

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Posted 07 June 2020 - 08:12 PM

I think i have that ocd. What i did was:

Make sure the polarscope is tightened in the mount.
Mount in home position.
1 of the 2 black rings on the polarscope has a small white mark on it, loosen the ring with a small flat screw and position the white mark facing to the top, and thighten the ring with the flat screw again.
Take out the whole polarscope en put it on a table with the eyepiece facing up.
Remove the eyepiece.
Loosen the 3 hex screws (used for calibrating the glass with the polar drawing on it) just enough so they feel loose.
When you look in the tube, you see that glass, with the ncp map, in a metal ring with two slots in it. Use a flashlight or something else to see the cross in the drawing, and use the flat screwdriver to move the glass (use the slots in that metal ring) till the north of the cross is aligned with the white mark from that first step.
Put everything back and dont forget to calibrate the polarscope again by aligning the center of the cross on polaris (for example) and rotate the ra axis to see if the center of the cross is still aligned. Probably not so use the hex screws to finetune.

Edited by Robindonne, 07 June 2020 - 08:17 PM.

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#4 Robindonne

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Posted 07 June 2020 - 08:15 PM

And it’s not silly at all. These 5 minutes compared to the rest of your live moving that axis are worth trying it. I think. Gr. A dutch ocd’er

#5 KTAZ

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Posted 07 June 2020 - 08:42 PM

Excellent. I have an appointment with my polar scope next weekend.

 

Thank you very much!



#6 KTAZ

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 08:08 PM

So this was even easier than expected. To clarify the process I followed:

 

1) In front of the Polar Scope (PS) calendar dial there are 2 rings that secure with tiny slotted head screws. There is really no need to touch these as long as both rings are secure and tight. The closest ring to the dial has a white scribe on it that is in the 12 o'clock position. You will use this line to visually align the reticle.

 

2) I used a strap wrench to remove the PS from the mount. It broke loose fairly easily and screws out. Channel locks will work as long as you have a piece of rubber to wrap around the PS barrel to avoid damage.

 

3) Always maintain the PS in a position with the eyepiece facing up. Unscrew and remove the eyepiece.

 

4) The reticle is actually a piece of glass housed in a round barrel similar to a filter. It is held in place, and its orientation adjusted, by the 3 Allen head screws in the PS barrel. Loosen the three screws 1/2 turn.

 

5) The reticle piece has 2 small slots for a spanner wrench to turn it. If you don't have a tiny spanner wrench (like most of us) just use a small screwdriver to gently jiggle the reticle in the direction you want being careful not to touch the glass. Visually check your progress against the white scribe until it is where you want it.

 

6) Tighten the 3 Allen screws back up in the same order you loosened them, put the eyepiece back in, and reassemble the scope into the mount.

 

You will need to calibrate the PS after you are finished. Mine is perfectly aligned now.


Edited by KTAZ, 08 June 2020 - 11:19 PM.

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#7 elmiko

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 09:39 PM

So this was even easier than expected. To clarify the process I followed:

 

1) In front of the Polar Scope (PS) calendar dial there are 2 rings that secure with tiny slotted head screws. There is really no need to touch these as long as both rings are secure and tight. The closest ring to the dial has a white scribe on it that is in the 12 o'clock position. You will use this line to visually align the reticle.

 

2) I used a strap wrench to remove the PS from the mount. It broke loose fairly easily and screws out. Channel locks will work as long as you have a piece of rubber to wrap around the PS barrel to avoid damage.

 

3) Always maintain the PS in a position with the eyepiece facing up. Unscrew and remove the eyepiece.

 

4) The reticle is actually a piece of glass housed in a round barrel similar to a filter. It is held in place, and its orientation adjusted, by the 3 Allen head screws in the PS barrel. Loosen the three screws 1/2 turn.

 

5) The reticle piece has 2 small slots for a spanner wrench to turn it. If you don't have a tiny spanner wrench (like most of us) just use a small screwdriver to gently jiggle the reticle in the direction you want being careful not to touch the glass. Visually check your progress against the white scribe until it is where you want it.

 

6) Tighten the 3 Allen screws back up in the same order you loosened them, put the eyepiece back in, and reassemble the scope into the mount.

 

You will need to align the PS after you are finished. Mine is perfectly aligned now.

You also want to calibrate the polar scope with the RA axis of the mount. In other words align it with the axis of the mount. Easiest to do in day light. Adjust the mounts Dec axis so the polar scope is aimed at a distant street light or something fixed. Aim it at the very top of the street light. Loosen the RA Clutch and rotate the Ra axis so the counterweight bar points west. Note where the polar scope is pointing. Adjust those 3 Collimation screws to aim the cross hairs at the top of the street light.

 Then point the counterweight bar to the east. Adjust the polar scope so it is aimed at the same spot on the light.

   Keep adjusting the 3 Collimation screws until the cross hairs stay fixed on the same point when you move the Ra axis that 180 degree rotation. If you don't Collimate the polar scope you will never know if you have an accurate polar alignment.

     There are tutorials on utube showing how to do this.   Good luck, and enjoy your new mount!

 If you are not imaging then the above isn't as important. What you have already done is good enough for visual Astronomy.


Edited by elmiko, 08 June 2020 - 09:41 PM.



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