Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Orion 8x25ED monocular

  • Please log in to reply
42 replies to this topic

#1 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 22 June 2020 - 06:45 PM

I posted about this monocular on a recent thread about monocular but I felt it is worth having its own thread.  A few months back I purchased the new Orion 8x25ED monocular and the Orion 10x42 monocular.  I won’t say much about the 10x42.  It is ok and I have a use for it.  But it falls off quite a bit in the outer field and does not have any of the advantages of the 8x25ED monocular.

 

So I’ve never had a monocular before but I wanted to try one because binoculars are too much bulk for my walks and my right eye has enough astigmatism that I never feel like I am getting a sharp view when I use my 8x42 Nikon binoculars at night.

 

So the Orion 8x25ED monocular is a really nice optic.  It is sharp to the edge.  It is clean and clear across the field. It reminds me very much of looking in one of my APOs with a DeLite in the star diagonal.   

 

A few nice features:

 

1.  The soft rubber caps are both very secure and easy to remove.  The caps are both exactly the same size so when you remove them it does not matter which end you put them back on.  That has been very convenient when I am out for a walk.  No fumbling around I get done with what I was looking at and can put the caps on while walking.   

 

2.  It is a nice slender and light size.  It is completely unobtrusive to have in the pocket of my jeans or shorts when out for a walk.  Compared to the bulky 10x42 it is a big difference.  It is basically the same size as a small flashlight. 

 

3.  Eye relief is perfect for glasses.  I can take in the entire field with my glasses on with no contact between the monocular and my glasses.  Now if you do not wear glasses it has a nice, smooth twist eyecup that will not fall back in unless you choose to twist it.

 

4.  Focus on this thing is very smooth.  There is a fine rubber grip ring for helping with focus.  The internal mechanism is smooth. I liked the first one so much I bought a second.  The second is actually looser on the internal movement than the first.  That makes it a little trickier to tune focus because it is easier to slip past the tightest focus. But it is not a problem.  I’m just noting there will be some variation.

 

5.  If you want it does come with a case and wrist strap.  I don’t use either when out on my walks.  I have it in my pocket. 

 

The optical performance of this zoom is outstanding both in daytime and night.  I am a picky about the aesthetics of he view.  The 10x42 is fine for daytime.  There are certain situations where I would use it.   But the 10x42 is too poor to use at night IMO.  Now the 8x25ED is exceptional for both.  The biggest thing to me is it presents that same high quality view as looking through an APO with a sharp from center to edge eyepiece such as a TV DeLite.

 

So in daytime the 8x25 monocular is clean and clear across the field.  I have noticed that it has a nice depth of field.  I can scan distant hills and the foreground trees, bushes, horses etc are also focused.  

 

At night has been a real shocker.  Once you get sharpest focus of stars dialed in at night the views are pretty stunning.  Last night in between swapping around which scope was on my mount I pulled out the monocular and scanned around for about 20 minutes taking in a bunch of targets.  Large open clusters such as the Alpha Perseus group, double cluster, NGC 7789, NGC 6633, IC4756, M6, M7 are quite incredible.  The M24 starcloud is impressive.  Then the emission nebula in Sagittarius are amazing.  

 

One change in the design that would be doable would be for Orion to put filter threads on the front of the monocular.  The tube is the perfect diameter and I think if you could thread a UHC filter on the front with that almost 7 deg field you could have a lot of fun studying large emission nebula.  This monocular is so sharp that would be quite enjoyable.  

 

I can’t emphasize enough that looking through this monocular at that night sky is like looking through a quality telescope.  

 

Anyway, I’ve never had a monocular before but I’m loving this one.  It would be kind of neat if they cam out with a 10x32 version of this.  

 

Dave

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • F38CB504-E549-4374-9ADD-D6ABD806DC27.jpeg

  • paulsky, Mark9473, Veridian and 6 others like this

#2 KennyJ

KennyJ

    The British Flash

  • *****
  • Posts: 38,384
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2003
  • Loc: Lancashire UK

Posted 23 June 2020 - 01:05 AM

Thanks for that very informative and very well presented review, Dave.

 

It was a great pleasure to read.

 

Kenny


  • Veridian and russell23 like this

#3 Mark9473

Mark9473

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,226
  • Joined: 21 Jul 2005
  • Loc: 51°N 4°E

Posted 23 June 2020 - 11:53 AM

Looks nice and sounds great. I've been eyeing a Vixen 6x21 ED monocular for a long time but the prohibitive price tag has put me off. This Orion model would be a great alternative.


  • russell23 likes this

#4 dufay

dufay

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 344
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2014
  • Loc: northern europe

Posted 23 June 2020 - 04:19 PM

I am wondering if this is the same as the Orionhttps://www.amazon.c...ding=UTF8&psc=1

 

At least it looks very similar, and the FOV and eye relief specifications are identical to that of the Orion.

 

If that's the case your wish for a 10x32 version seems to have come true. 

 

 

 


  • Veridian and russell23 like this

#5 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 23 June 2020 - 08:00 PM

I am wondering if this is the same as the Orionhttps://www.amazon.c...ding=UTF8&psc=1

 

At least it looks very similar, and the FOV and eye relief specifications are identical to that of the Orion.

 

If that's the case your wish for a 10x32 version seems to have come true. 

YEs.  That looks like the same thing.  Svbony and Orion offer a number of things that are the same. I went ahead and bought the 10x32.  Thanks for the link!


  • dufay likes this

#6 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 25 June 2020 - 10:01 AM

I used the 8x25 monocular for ~20 minutes last night during a 4 1/2 hour observing session.  It is just really good.  The image is clear across the field.  Stars were pinpoint sharp.

 

The large field gives such a different perspective than a telescope and yet the view is like looking through a telescope.   Granted - it is a 25mm ED refractor, but it has the optics to present like a refractor. 

 

One thing I really enjoyed was seeing multiple DSO in the same field such as M6/M7, M8/M20/M2,  NGC 6633 and IC4756 and so on.

 

So this is a real nice tool to have in my nighttime observing set.   I actually bought a second sample a few weeks after the first.  The second one is a little harder to get to sharpest focus because it has a looser focus mechanism.  So the first one is dialed in for pinpoint sharp star images and I just leave it in my eyepiece box. The second one I take on walks in our woods because I'm looking at birds or whatever at different distances and have to change focus anyway.


  • paulsky likes this

#7 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 27 June 2020 - 08:31 PM

The Svbony 10x32 monocular arrived today.   I’ve attached photos below.  Here are a few comments/first impressions.

 

1.  The Svbony 10x32 build quality is as excellent as the Orion 8x25 version.  It is solid and the focus mechanism is smooth.  The case is identical to the Orion case but larger.

 

2.  The caps on the 10x32 are a harder plastic cap than the soft rubber caps on the Orion.  However, they slip on and off easy and as with the 8x25 the two ends are identical so you don’t have to fumble with the caps.  

 

3.  The exit pupil is easy and I can wear my glasses without contact with the eye cup.

 

4.  The 10x32 is noticeably heavier - about 1 lb vs. ~9oz for the 8x25.  This does not seem to be an issue in hand, but it will probably be less convenient carried in a pants/shorts pocket.  

 

5.  There were two QC things to note.   First a place where the annodizing was rubbed off the barrel - about the size of an eraser head.  This is completely irrelevant, but nothing like that was seen on either of the two Orion samples I bought.   The second is that there are some reddish-purple looking spots on the eye lens coating.  This has no optical impact that I could see.  At first I thought the spots were some kind of residue.  However, the spots did not clean off.  My assumption is some uneven deposition of the coating.  

 

6.   The coatings are a different color than the Orion version.  The Orion has a green color coating while the Svbony has a purple/magenta coating.  

 

Optical performance: The 10x32 was super sharp on a daytime test and had really good, but not perfect performance near the edges.  The Orion 8x25 may be a little better at the edges - but not significantly.  Holding one up to each eye it looks like if the Orion version has a 54.4 deg AFOV then the 10x32 probably has a 58 deg AFOV.  

 

I looked at the Moon with both the the 8x25 and the 10x32 tonight.   The extra magnification was noticeable without making it substantively harder to hold the image steady.  Both were very sharp and clean.  

 

One of the things I like about these monoculars is that I can have both hands on it when using but rest one hand against my cheek to help stabilize.  So I think it is much easier to hold the image steady than binoculars.

 

Dave

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 9378FBE8-98B5-4113-BE1B-C7567C08A4C6.jpeg
  • 6C62A40A-4CFF-42DE-B02D-4DA1EDEE118F.jpeg
  • DE1D0770-49B4-42C7-AF26-D4E0ACACA91E.jpeg

  • paulsky, Veridian, eklf and 4 others like this

#8 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 27 June 2020 - 11:13 PM

I just got in from a good long session with the 10x32 and 8x25 monoculars looking at DSO.  The 10x32 took some effort to dial in for sharpest star images.  The challenge was at 10x trying to get the stars at their sharpest when one hand was focusing more than stabilizing.  Once done I just left it alone and scanned around.  

 

The 32mm provides 64% more light than the 25mm which is quite noticeable as any aperture jump is.  M27 was a case where the aperture jump made a big difference in detecting the nebula under the current lunar phase.  Other objects showed an obvious difference in brightness between the two monoculars. The 10x32 model is as sharp as the 8x25 model.   I estimated the field of the 10x32 is ~6.5 deg based upon locating bright stars that fit the field.

 

So the 10x32 provided a nice relaxing tool for scanning around and taking in larger DSO and pairs/groups of DSO.   Both monoculars will provide a nice option to add into the mix of what I use.  I definitely think the 10x32 model is as large a monocular and high a magnification as I would want for hand held observing. 


Edited by russell23, 27 June 2020 - 11:15 PM.

  • Veridian and mwedel like this

#9 KennyJ

KennyJ

    The British Flash

  • *****
  • Posts: 38,384
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2003
  • Loc: Lancashire UK

Posted 28 June 2020 - 12:52 AM

Thanks for another fine review, Dave.

 

There does appear to be a discrepancy between your "eyeball estimated" AFOV of 58 deg and "observed star spaced" TFOV of 6.5 deg.

 

Kenny



#10 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 28 June 2020 - 05:45 AM

Thanks for another fine review, Dave.

 

There does appear to be a discrepancy between your "eyeball estimated" AFOV of 58 deg and "observed star spaced" TFOV of 6.5 deg.

 

Kenny

Kenny,

Yeah the two estimates give the window for the TFOV.  I would trust my estimate from the stars more than my eyeball estimates by comparing the two fields.
 

On a side note I have to be careful how I position myself while observing with these things.  My neck is sore this morning because I was sitting in an Adirondack chair in all sorts of weird angles.

 

Dave


Edited by russell23, 28 June 2020 - 05:46 AM.

  • KennyJ and Veridian like this

#11 dufay

dufay

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 344
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2014
  • Loc: northern europe

Posted 28 June 2020 - 11:55 AM

Inspired by this tread went ahead and ordered the Svbony 8x25ED. It arrived on Friday.

 

It performs much like how Dave describes the Orion 8x25. The field appears flat and edge aberrations are very well controlled. Looking at a brick wall or foliage at a distance, the whole field of view is well defined at once. Stars turn astigmatic only very close to the edge of the field. Impressive performance at this price point. Focusing is smooth. The coating has a green reflection like the Orion. The caps are soft rubber and look identical to the ones pictured in post #1. The focuser has that dark metallic color seen on the Svbony 10x32 pictured above, which sets it apart from the Orion version. 


  • Veridian, mwedel, russell23 and 1 other like this

#12 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 28 June 2020 - 01:43 PM

Inspired by this tread went ahead and ordered the Svbony 8x25ED. It arrived on Friday.

 

It performs much like how Dave describes the Orion 8x25. The field appears flat and edge aberrations are very well controlled. Looking at a brick wall or foliage at a distance, the whole field of view is well defined at once. Stars turn astigmatic only very close to the edge of the field. Impressive performance at this price point. Focusing is smooth. The coating has a green reflection like the Orion. The caps are soft rubber and look identical to the ones pictured in post #1. The focuser has that dark metallic color seen on the Svbony 10x32 pictured above, which sets it apart from the Orion version. 

Thanks for sharing!  I'm really glad to hear it is consistent with the Svbony as well.  I noticed in the pictures on Amazon that only the 10x32 has the red/purple coatings.  The 8x32 also has the green as does the 8x25. 
 


  • Veridian and dufay like this

#13 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 08 July 2020 - 09:36 PM

Orion has just put their 8x25ED monocular on sale for $5 off. Still more than the Svbony version but getting closer.


  • mwedel likes this

#14 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 13 July 2020 - 11:10 PM

Just had a good hour of observing tonight.  I was too tired to set up my scopes so I used the monoculars.  The 10x32 is a really nice balance of comfort, magnification and light gathering.  The difference between the 10x32 and 8x25 is certainly noticeable, but the ease of use is the same.  Numerous DSO show really well but I think my favorite tonight was the large nebula complex in Cygnus. 



#15 Mark9473

Mark9473

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,226
  • Joined: 21 Jul 2005
  • Loc: 51°N 4°E

Posted 14 July 2020 - 03:32 AM

Dave, given that a 10x32 binocular would give such a vastly superior view compared to a 10x32 monocular, could you explain your reasons for choosing a monocular for viewing DSO?



#16 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 14 July 2020 - 07:39 AM

Dave, given that a 10x32 binocular would give such a vastly superior view compared to a 10x32 monocular, could you explain your reasons for choosing a monocular for viewing DSO?

Hi Mark,

 

Sure thing.  I have a pair of 8x42 Nikon Monarch 5 binoculars.  Here is what I have found:

 

1.  My astigmatism is very different in my two eyes.  The astigmatism is worse in my right eye and it is very hard to get the focus properly dialed in so that the image is nice and sharp.  My glasses may not correct my astigmatism enough for my right eye to really use binoculars.

 

2.  Binoculars are heavier and harder to hold steady.

 

3.  With the monocular I observe with the left eye and I rest/tuck my right hand next to my nose and I find that this allows me to hold the monocular very steady - much more so than with binoculars.  My right hand is acting as a brace.  With binoculars my right hand is not free to help steady.

 

4.  Sometimes adjusting the IPD with the binoculars while wearing glasses just leaves me feeling like you do when a piece of clothing just doesn't quite fit right.

 

These monoculars I have are excellent and fit easily in a coat pocket.  I had one in the chest pocket while using the other last night.  Very easy.  Optically they are very good.  The view is much like looking through a nice refractor with a clean view across the field.

 

Dave


  • Veridian, mwedel, jcj380 and 1 other like this

#17 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 14 July 2020 - 07:59 AM

Thanks for another fine review, Dave.

 

There does appear to be a discrepancy between your "eyeball estimated" AFOV of 58 deg and "observed star spaced" TFOV of 6.5 deg.

 

Kennys

Kenny,

 

Last  night I did another estimate from finding bright stars that fit across the field.  The distance between alpha and delta Cassiopeia was just a sliver more than the field of the 10x32 monocular.  Measuring on the charts looks like 6 deg exactly which would give AFOV = 60 deg so that is closer to my eyeball estimate from comparing the two monoculars.

 

Dave


  • Veridian likes this

#18 Mark9473

Mark9473

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,226
  • Joined: 21 Jul 2005
  • Loc: 51°N 4°E

Posted 14 July 2020 - 08:36 AM

Thanks for your clarifications, Dave.



#19 Bob_McBob

Bob_McBob

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 10
  • Joined: 03 Nov 2007

Posted 23 January 2021 - 05:13 PM

4.  The 10x32 is noticeably heavier - about 1 lb vs. ~9oz for the 8x25.  This does not seem to be an issue in hand, but it will probably be less convenient carried in a pants/shorts pocket.  

That's a huge difference from the manufacturer's spec of 253g for the Svbony 10x32! A pound is rather a lot for a monocular. I've been checking out the 8x32 model, and I'm trying to sort out how accurate the dimensions and weight are. I'm mostly interested because they're reasonably compact compared to the competition, seemingly in large part due to the lack of body armour and contoured grip. 


  • Veridian likes this

#20 ihf

ihf

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,459
  • Joined: 14 Jan 2019
  • Loc: California, USA

Posted 23 January 2021 - 09:44 PM

I missed the true weight here when I ordered it, no wonder my dad complained about the size of the 8x25!


Edited by ihf, 23 January 2021 - 09:46 PM.


#21 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 12,224
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 24 January 2021 - 03:49 PM

That's a huge difference from the manufacturer's spec of 253g for the Svbony 10x32! A pound is rather a lot for a monocular. I've been checking out the 8x32 model, and I'm trying to sort out how accurate the dimensions and weight are. I'm mostly interested because they're reasonably compact compared to the competition, seemingly in large part due to the lack of body armour and contoured grip. 

I’m not sure where I got those weights ... maybe off Amazon.  Possibly they were shipping weights.  According to Orion the 8x25 is 0.4 lbs.  `I just hefted the 10x32 vs. a 1 pound weight and the 10x32 is much lighter than the weight so the weights I mentioned must have been shipping weights.


  • Veridian, Bob_McBob and ihf like this

#22 Veridian

Veridian

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 908
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2006
  • Loc: Milwaukee County, Wis.

Posted 14 September 2021 - 04:04 AM

Just had a good hour of observing tonight.  I was too tired to set up my scopes so I used the monoculars.  The 10x32 is a really nice balance of comfort, magnification and light gathering.  The difference between the 10x32 and 8x25 is certainly noticeable, but the ease of use is the same.  Numerous DSO show really well but I think my favorite tonight was the large nebula complex in Cygnus. 

Dave,

 

   After reading your posts, as well as those from others, regarding the SvBony 10x32 ED monocular, I was moved to purchase their 8x32 monocular (SV36). As this thread has aged some, my hope is that your thoughts are still positive towards the SvBony 10x32.

   Once receiving the 8x32 and putting it to some use, if anyone here is still interested, I could post some thoughts on how it performs for my intended use.

 

Many thanks for all the information you provided on these monoculars.

 

Mark J.D.



#23 theskywatcher

theskywatcher

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 98
  • Joined: 03 May 2019

Posted 14 September 2021 - 12:46 PM

Hi Mark J.D.,

 

Thx for posting.  I would like to see your thoughts about the 8x32.

 

I have an old Zeiss 8x30 B monocular that looks just like half a set of binoculars.  I like it, but it came to me with no end caps.  I keep it in an eyeglass case that Target sold years ago.  I also added an old Canon camera neck strap to it, so its 11 ounces of weight are more evenly distributed across my neck.

 

I was recently gifted a Vixen 8x20 monocular.  With a smaller field of view, of course it's more difficult to find things.  But it weighs only about 4 ounces and is shaped like a small tube, so far easier to carry.  Its 2 identically sized end caps are also nice.

 

But they don't get much use at night due to my Oberwerk 8x42 Sport ED binos or my 10x42 L IS.  But they remain nice options.  I have read that some can't hold a monocular steady.  I just rest one or even both hands partially against some part of my face, and find that is as steady as holding a pair of binoculars.  I can also block the view of my other eye while resting my hands on my face, keeping both eyes open for less fatigue.

 

Looking forward to your posts!


  • Veridian likes this

#24 Veridian

Veridian

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 908
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2006
  • Loc: Milwaukee County, Wis.

Posted 16 September 2021 - 01:44 AM

Hi Mark J.D.,

 

Thx for posting.  I would like to see your thoughts about the 8x32.

 

I have an old Zeiss 8x30 B monocular that looks just like half a set of binoculars.  I like it, but it came to me with no end caps.  I keep it in an eyeglass case that Target sold years ago.  I also added an old Canon camera neck strap to it, so its 11 ounces of weight are more evenly distributed across my neck.

 

I was recently gifted a Vixen 8x20 monocular.  With a smaller field of view, of course it's more difficult to find things.  But it weighs only about 4 ounces and is shaped like a small tube, so far easier to carry.  Its 2 identically sized end caps are also nice.

 

But they don't get much use at night due to my Oberwerk 8x42 Sport ED binos or my 10x42 L IS.  But they remain nice options.  I have read that some can't hold a monocular steady.  I just rest one or even both hands partially against some part of my face, and find that is as steady as holding a pair of binoculars.  I can also block the view of my other eye while resting my hands on my face, keeping both eyes open for less fatigue.

 

Looking forward to your posts!

 

Will do and thanks for the reply. Nice to see someone is still following this thread. It's an interesting one.

 

  Some years ago, an 8x21mm finder was bought to see if it could be useful, for much the same reasoning as russell23 (Dave). These were originally purposed as finder scopes for the older Meade ETX 90 maks. Well, it was kind of clunky for focusing and didn't work out for me. 

   Recently, an inexpensive (read as cheap) 4x12 monocular was purchased to be used as an add-on to a Cheshire eyepiece for enhanced collimation, as so well described by Precaud in another thread. It came to mind to just try it out on stars and turns out it does ok. It is very easy to focus and has a decent FOV.  Alpha, Beta and Gamma Cassiopeia fit into its FOV and with room to spare at the edges. Of course, with only 12mm aperture it sure can't bring in much light. This thing has an 8x21mm sibling and some thought was given to maybe trying one out. Although it seemed a better idea to first seek out some threads on monoculars here on CN. Glad I did.

 

   Initially, based upon Dave's experiences, the Orion 8x25mm ED monocular was going to be ordered. Then, the SvBony options came up. The decision was to go with the 8x32 SvBony. I have had mostly good luck with Orion products and really like their customer service, but price was a big factor and I've also been having good luck with items bought from SvBony.

 

   After the 8x32 monocular arrives and it has had some time being tested, I will get back with what is found.

 

Mark J.D.



#25 Goodchild

Goodchild

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,137
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2008

Posted 17 September 2021 - 01:47 PM

I may have missed it but do monoculars give an upright or upside-down view?




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics