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Rimae Triesnecker, which rilles can you see with your apos?

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#1 btr209

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Posted 27 June 2020 - 05:32 AM

https://the-moon.us/...mae_Triesnecker

 

I can spot V and VII in my SW Mak180.



#2 Don Taylor

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Posted 27 June 2020 - 11:17 AM

I've observed the Treisnecker Rilles on several occasions with different scopes. Of course, the phase of the moon and resultant oblique lighting play a large part in the visibility of the rilles.  I think I've had only one session where I could see the majority of the Rilles shown in the Wiki article photo.

 

Looking back at my observing notes from that session on February 1, 2020 I could see the polygon formed between I and V just to the WSW of Triesnecker crater, along with II, III, VI, and VII. I was not able to spot the subtle ridges just to the east of Triesnecker crater. It appeared that V extended south almost to Rhaeticus crater then continued along the east rim extending south towards Horrocks but that feature is not labelled on my lunar maps - perhaps sunlight catching a line of mountain tops? Rille I extended almost to Rhaeticus A. Easily traced Ariadaeus Rille to the west and also the Oppolzer Rille from the rim of Rhaeticus crater curving to the east to near Reamur crater.  I did not note seeing Reamur Rille. The light angle made it look like there was a central peak in Hygenius crater but that was apparently an illusion as Hygenius is a volcanic crater and not an impact crater.

 

BTW, each time I've observed I see a bright "bleached" area of white - on the northeaster slopes of Triesnecker crater extending towards the adjacent hills . The total size of the bleached area is maybe 1/4 the size of Triesnecker crater. My lunar maps do not show that feature either but I've seen it in two scopes on two different occasions.

 

Scope was the Altair Starwave 102mm F11 ED on a Viven GP2 mount. Eyepieces were 13mm and 9mm Nagler T6 and 6mm Radian.

 

Several years ago I observed I, II, & V with my 80mm achromat (A-P guidescope). Hope this helps.


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#3 btr209

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Posted 27 June 2020 - 01:32 PM

Thanks for this report, good observation skills considering the 102mm aperture, at the limit of what this refractor can do, well done!



#4 Don Taylor

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Posted 27 June 2020 - 02:26 PM

Thanks! Actually i think i just caught it at the right time to get helpful lighting.

#5 Don Taylor

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 09:09 AM

I realize there has not been a lot of activity on this thread - but I need to make a correction as someone my find this thread in the future. My observing report gave directions of West & East in relation to the sky - e.g. as seen from Earth.  The directions relative to the Lunar surface are reversed. That is, if you were standing on the rim of Triesnecker Crater on the Moon the "subtle ridges just to the east of Triesnecker" in my report would actually be to your West. So, for Lunar directions please reverse East & West.  North & South are not changed. Sorry for the confusion.



#6 btr209

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 11:41 AM

No worries Don.

The limited activity of this thread does not really surprise me, although I would have preferred to be wrong: most apo owners spend more time looking at their instrument than looking in it. This is obviously not your case Don, let's hope that more  non-worshippers will join this thread.



#7 ATM57

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 07:46 PM

This is one of my favorite areas (top 3) to observe on the moon. The real challenges for me are the series of craterletts on the southern end of rille I. Also, seeing Triesnecker G as a double crater and the double crater between G & F are my other favorite test targets when the seeing is good. These are fairly tough with a 5" (APO Meade 127). They are much easier to see with my 150ED.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Triesnecker_Hyginus .jpg
  • Triesnecker F_G.jpg

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#8 Don Taylor

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 08:19 PM

I think the next time I observe this area I'll look at (or for) the craterlets. In the past I've concentrated mainly on the Rilles themselves.  Thanks!!

 

P.S. I like the photos! Sunlight is illuminating the floor of Hygenius and it looks like the (non-existant) "central peak" I mentioned in Post #2.


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#9 payner

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Posted Yesterday, 11:47 AM

Great topic and discussion. The pics by ATM57 are incredible and inspiring.

As for lack of discussion, it is not unexpected in the Refractors Forum. If this had been placed in the Lunar Forum it would no doubt attract more interest.

Best,


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