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Why is it we always buy another scope when we are happy with the one we have?

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#26 Paul Sweeney

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 12:42 PM

I mostly buy out of curiosity. Is scope x really better than what I already have? Buy it and find out. I learned a lot. Mostly I learned that there is no perfect scope, and "pretty good" is a lot cheaper than "almost perfect" and, with the seeing here, gives about the same image quality. A while ago I did a reality check and decided that what I have is really pretty good. No need to buy any more scopes. Then I turned right around and bought an Apollo 60/900. I just wanted to see how it stacked up to my Tasco 9t.
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#27 starman876

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 12:53 PM

I mostly buy out of curiosity. Is scope x really better than what I already have? Buy it and find out. I learned a lot. Mostly I learned that there is no perfect scope, and "pretty good" is a lot cheaper than "almost perfect" and, with the seeing here, gives about the same image quality. A while ago I did a reality check and decided that what I have is really pretty good. No need to buy any more scopes. Then I turned right around and bought an Apollo 60/900. I just wanted to see how it stacked up to my Tasco 9t.

our curiousity will empty out our bank account if not kept under control



#28 rcwolpert

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 01:47 PM

I don’t think there exists a scope that I’m not curious about. 


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#29 starman876

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 02:06 PM

I don’t think there exists a scope that I’m not curious about. 

I know

 

We do not buy more refridgerators and compare them with each other lol.gif


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#30 GreyDay

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 03:03 PM

I mostly buy out of curiosity. Is scope x really better than what I already have? Buy it and find out.

Yep !

 

Thats the problem i have. I've finished on 60mm's after buying a Zeiss, just bought a Zeiss 50/540 objective as an OTA project so maybe 50's are done? though i'd buy a Swift 838 if one comes up for the right money.

 

80 and 100mm to go... :)


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#31 wfj

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 03:31 PM

It is easier to buy them than it is to sell them.


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#32 Kasmos

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 03:46 PM

I've owned several since they were new (now classics) and the others (mostly some 60mms), were bought for several reasons. Curious of their performance, interesting construction, beauty, and most were a good or great deal. Also, most needed some kind of fixing and or restoring which I enjoy as much as observing. 

 

It's interesting to see how each maker may do things a little different and even though not a  true sampling, how they perform against each other.

 

It's a lot like be a guitarist. They usually don't only have one and they appreciate the ones they collect and play for there performance and beauty. Both of my brothers are guitarist and have collected and sold many and over the years and every now and then they'd open a velvet lined case to show me a beautifull old Fender or Gibson. I get the same vibes when opening a wood case containing a classic scope.

 

As I go, I'm finding out which ones are keepers and which will be sold. I have more than enough to use and enjoy, so don't plan on buying anymore.


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#33 starman876

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 04:58 PM

I've owned several since they were new (now classics) and the others (mostly some 60mms), were bought for several reasons. Curious of their performance, interesting construction, beauty, and most were a good or great deal. Also, most needed some kind of fixing and or restoring which I enjoy as much as observing. 

 

It's interesting to see how each maker may do things a little different and even though not a  true sampling, how they perform against each other.

 

It's a lot like be a guitarist. They usually don't only have one and they appreciate the ones they collect and play for there performance and beauty. Both of my brothers are guitarist and have collected and sold many and over the years and every now and then they'd open a velvet lined case to show me a beautifull old Fender or Gibson. I get the same vibes when opening a wood case containing a classic scope.

 

As I go, I'm finding out which ones are keepers and which will be sold. I have more than enough to use and enjoy, so don't plan on buying anymore.

I love guitars also.  I have a double issue loving both telescopes and guitars.  I also love fine art and a few other things.   I really have it bad.  Did I mention I like classic mercedes SL's.  


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#34 RalphMeisterTigerMan

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 05:04 PM

I believe it's just human nature to want something better, newer, bigger, etc, etc. How many times have you been to a star party and looked thru another amateur's scope that is larger and better than yours. Then come the thoughts of "oh wow, with that other scope that I looked thru I'd be able to see so much more". The problem is that we probably didn't see what it took to set-up that huge super-scope and what he transported it in. There is a reason why some really uber serious amateurs tow a trailer behind their huge pick-up. That trailer serves as a place to store that massive telescope, to transport it and then at a star-party a place to live in.

 

I downsized for some very important reasons. Hernia, a recently diagnosed Heart condition, torn and damaged rotator cuff which will require surgery and several more. I'm not trying complain about my health problems but rather to explain why I choose my present telescope. Sure, the 6-inch will show more but everything together, OTA, mount and tripod will end up adding up to a weight that I will most likely find difficult to deal with.

 

I think I'll be happy with my little C5+ especially considering that I have a fair amount of light-pollution to deal with. It will show me the Moon and planets with quite a bit of detail and enough DSO's to satisfy my appetite for faint fuzzies. So, I'll enjoy my C5+ and everyone who responded to this thread will hopefully enjoy their telescopes.

 

Clear skies!

RalphMeisterTigerMan


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#35 Bomber Bob

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 06:11 PM

Yep !

 

Thats the problem i have. I've finished on 60mm's after buying a Zeiss, just bought a Zeiss 50/540 objective as an OTA project so maybe 50's are done? though i'd buy a Swift 838 if one comes up for the right money.

 

80 and 100mm to go... smile.gif

Yep.  My 60s stopped with the Goto -- my only complete 60mm kit now.  IME, the Swift 838 could be your 50mm stopping point.  For a 3" refractor, it's hard to say, because I haven't tried an Edmund, Goto, Hiyoshi, Mizar, Pentax, or Vixen -- Man!  So many left on that list!  

 

Besides scopes...  I love music, and I learned to work the saxophone, but I never cared to collect those.  I do have a mini antique / vintage radio / stereo collection, and -- of course -- a ton of Auburn University / War Eagle! stuff (which makes me an easy person to buy for).


Edited by Bomber Bob, 30 June 2020 - 06:17 PM.

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#36 starman876

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 06:55 PM

Yep.  My 60s stopped with the Goto -- my only complete 60mm kit now.  IME, the Swift 838 could be your 50mm stopping point.  For a 3" refractor, it's hard to say, because I haven't tried an Edmund, Goto, Hiyoshi, Mizar, Pentax, or Vixen -- Man!  So many left on that list!  

 

Besides scopes...  I love music, and I learned to work the saxophone, but I never cared to collect those.  I do have a mini antique / vintage radio / stereo collection, and -- of course -- a ton of Auburn University / War Eagle! stuff (which makes me an easy person to buy for).

I did start collecting Guitars bawling.gif   Did I mention I am in to high end audio also.  Lucky for me I never lost any money on anything I collected.   



#37 ccwemyss

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 09:00 PM

Collecting can be a hobby in itself. When I was younger, I was more into it. I collected rocks, minerals, and fossils. But I didn't get serious about it until I started teaching geology. Then it was the thrill of the hunt to fill out all the different crystal systems and groups, and all the time periods, so the kids could see the variety and the progressions of life. Similar to the way I was hunting down classic scopes over a couple of years to build up the loaner set.

 

For my own use, I went after my aspirational scopes from when I was in my 30's and couldn't afford them, but not really collecting - just wish fulfillment. The one collection I keep adding to (via subscription) is the National Geographics. When I was in high school, there was a used book dealer nearby where I could buy back issues for a few dollars per year. That was fun to do each weekend. Still missing 1898 through 1911, and haven't really looked since that time to fill in that gap. But they are a kick to pull out at random, and see how the world has changed.

 

It's also been a lot of fun getting the loaner scopes into usable condition. I mostly went for scratch-n-dent specials to keep the cost down, and then learned a lot fixing them up. So that's another reason - Peter exemplifies the buy it to learn about it motive, which is probably why I enjoy his threads (and Neil's and others restoration threads) so much. 

 

Chip W. 


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#38 Vesper818

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 11:33 PM

I just like projects.
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#39 Senex Bibax

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 05:54 AM

I currently have four telescopes, which is probably two more than I need. What keeps my telescope acquisition manageable is that none of them cost more than $85.00.

 

Like many others on this thread, I also have acquired a collection of musical instruments - it's one each of guitar, bass, saxophone, wind synth, keyboard, plus a few miscellaneous odds and ends. I' not good enough on any of them to want to acquire more. Like my telescopes I have been careful to pick bargains with decent quality.

 

Let's not talk about the three vintage scooters and assorted parts in the garage, and all of the others that have passed through, though...



#40 sg6

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 06:31 AM

I tend to think that whatever it is looks interesting and it might be a reasonable idea to get it. Although I have few what could be called classic scopes - what defines a classic?

 

Any would still have to fit a requirement for me to consider a purchase. And so for me that also means I have a niche to fill and also means I tend to keep the scope. I do not replace Scope A with Scope B where they in effect do the same job. Would simply be a case of Scope B looks nice but I already have Scope A, so forget it.

 

A classic I do not buy for performance, modern ED's will be more convenient and out perform them in most cases. And some early ED's are probably moving in to the classic status now.

 

So I suggest "curiosity". As in I wonder what that would be like to use?

And there is only one way to find out. Buy it, use it and find out.


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#41 tim53

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 07:01 AM

b.jpg


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#42 Terra Nova

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 07:02 AM

"I believe it's just human nature to want something better, newer, bigger, etc, etc"

 

Hopefully not human nature. That's what they want us to think tho. It's a capitalist advertising ploy that is driving blatant consumerism.


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#43 Darth_Takahashi

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 07:28 AM

I'm still have some pain writing this but the one telescope that I should never have sold was my BabyQ. Today, I have four other telescopes covering multiple focal lengths, giving me all sorts of imaging options. Well thats what I tell my wife any way. lol.gif

 

1, Tak Epsilon 130ED  - wide field imaging excellent for the large DSO's

2, Tak TOA130F with various accessories, bought whilst living in Japan and my most versatile telescope (Starbase - Akihabara)

3, Tak Mewlon 250CRS - planet killer and small DSO imaging platform. Ordered specially for me, the tube ring version and bought again in Japan (Starbase - Akihabara)

4, My latest addtion is a Omegon branded (GSO-RC 355mm) which I plan on being a galaxy beast imaging at either F6 or F5.7 if I can get it there!!!

4.5 WO72 guide scope that normally sits on top of my Mewlon

 

Yes, I know, I have a problem! A Takahashi problem. I found my way to this brand 14 years ago and it has never let me down. I do try to save some money! The Epsilon was bought secondhand from a user in the UK here on CN in mint condition.

 

Before settling on these telescopes I have had a couple of Williams Optics Zenith Stars and Vixen telescopes, the 130SD being the worst of them and not lasting a month because of CA!

 

Finally, I do stay clear of what I would call "Boutique Telescopes"waytogo.gifCompany's trying to reinvent the telescope, making them worse or more difficult to use for some imaginary gain in optical performance. There is no perfect telescope and all of the best optical designs / configurations have been known for the better part of a century. What has changed is that we amateurs can now afford to buy professional grade optics at a fraction of the cost they were just 30 year's ago!

 

Regards

 

 

Neil


Edited by Darth_Takahashi, 01 July 2020 - 10:00 AM.

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#44 tim53

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 09:50 AM

My Tak Epsilon 130 on a EM-1 mount from 1985 is my favorite imaging platform for DSOs by a lot.  I too have become something of a Tak collector without intending to.  It started with the purchase of an NJP mount.  The seller had a mint EM-10, so I bought that as well.  He tried to get me to buy his Mewlon 250, but that would have broken the bank at the time.  Next I bought an EM-500 mount from 1993, then an FC-76 on a P2 mount from 1982.

 

post-6788-14074130241284_thumb.jpg


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#45 Bomber Bob

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 10:28 AM

I just like projects.

Me, too.  Decades of moving in the USAF wasn't conducive to repairing & restoring.  Having a workshop kinda prompts taking on projects.  And, up until I joined CN, I'd only bought refractors and 1 Mak-Cass, so I had some catching up to do on first-hand experience with different designs.  Buying, testing, restoring, and passing scopes along is a pretty good way to spend your "later years" IMO...


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#46 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 11:41 AM

Maybe the 'hunt' is for happiness, not a scope per sé. Some of us have to learn to be happy with what we have. It's good to finally come to accept the idea that perfection is an ideal rather than a reality. There's imperfection in everything. Once we get to that, life becomes a whole lot easier. Then good enough winds up being best and you can start really enjoying what you have rather than wanting something else. It's like that with most things, not just telescopes.

 

I am enjoying this thread.  This rings true with me.

 

I'm not someone searching for perfection, I find a scope that's a good fit for observing the way I like to observe and I keep it.  I've had my 10 inch GSO Dob for 17 years. It's never been my biggest or best scope but it's a good one.  I spend a lot of time observing and I want good scopes and I want choices but I'm OK with good. 

 

Some people think in terms of improving the weakest link. I'm confident my equipment is good enough that the weakest link is me, my skills, my knowledge and understanding, there's plenty of room for me to grow before my equipment is the limiting factor.

 

Observing is my primary interest but I'm also an inverterate bargain hunter with a curiosity to satisfy. I see a deal on a nice older scope and my eyes light up and as my friend Bob says, "It makes me nervous." This where my interest in Classics arose. I like simple things that have stood the test of time. Enjoying and RV-6 or an 80 mm F/11 in the backyard is an enjoyable evening.

 

But as Terra said, we learn about ourselves. Every scope purchased for curiosity and variety eventually deserves a new home where it's appreciated and enjoyed rather than just another box in a corner. That means finding a new home and the inevitable boxing up and shipping. So, I've learned to control my urges and confine myself to window shopping the ads.

 

Jon


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#47 ccwemyss

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 12:32 PM

 

There is no perfect telescope and all of the best optical designs / configurations have been known for the better part of a century. What has changed is that we amateurs can now afford to buy professional grade optics at a fraction of the cost they were just 30 year's ago!

 

Regards

 

 

Neil

Not strictly true. The last 50 years have seen development of optical materials and coatings that have enabled designs opticians could only dream of before that. And the resolution, flatness, and color requirements of digital imaging systems have been pushing designers to try new approaches. More incorporation of fluorite and ED glasses, higher transmission coatings enabling more elements in the optical path, shorter f-ratios than we ever imagined being color free and flat field, larger low-expansion mirrors, etc.

 

But for the more common, non-exotic scopes, it's quite true that we still see the same basic designs that were developed a century ago (some of which were considered exotic then). And the average quality has improved. Although folks like DAVIDG will point out that ultimately, quality still depends on the care take by the optician. 

 

I think that's another reason people try new scopes. At the upper end, there is considerably artistry. So a few makes, like Clark, RAO, Nikon, Zeiss, Astro Physics, Takahashi, etc., develop almost mythical reputations, and when someone has the opportunity to try one, it's hard to resist. 

 

Chip W.



#48 Bomber Bob

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Posted Yesterday, 11:12 AM

About my buying, testing, restoring, and passing scopes along:  I hope that I wasn't bidding against anyone on this Forum, but I won the Meade Model 390 on the GW.

 

- In all these years, I've never owned a 90mm refractor;

- This is my 1st Taiwan-made scope;

- Based on my research, these are "sleeper" scopes with good optics, but not so good mounts;

- If this Sleeper turns out to be a Keeper, at least one of my other fracs will go!


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#49 Terra Nova

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Posted Yesterday, 11:18 AM

Congratulations. The Meade 390s and 395s made in Taiwan just after they shifted production from Japan had very good glass. Mounts, focusers, and finders not so much.


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#50 Bomber Bob

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Posted Yesterday, 11:33 AM

Congratulations. The Meade 390s and 395s made in Taiwan just after they shifted production from Japan had very good glass. Mounts, focusers, and finders not so much.

Thanks Terra!  Lots of good posts on the lenses, but I don't think any of these have been on a DPAC rig -- yet.  We will see, and I will report the good, the bad, & the ugly!


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