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Full-frame DSLR, Bulb Shutter Setting

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#1 proa

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 09:43 PM

Hi: I am a beginner and intend to buy a DSLR. Do you  have a full-frame camera and does it give you any advantages?

 

While we're at it, does your camera have Bulb Shutter Setting and does that give you any advantages?

 

Thanks.

 

 



#2 bobzeq25

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 11:12 PM

Hi: I am a beginner and intend to buy a DSLR. Do you  have a full-frame camera and does it give you any advantages?

 

While we're at it, does your camera have Bulb Shutter Setting and does that give you any advantages?

 

Thanks.

Full frame is only an advantage if your optics can cover the field well, without too much distortion.  Many camera lenses can.  Relatively few moderately priced scopes.  The buzzwords are "image circle." 

 

Bulb is virtually a necessity for the exposures for deep space.  Also, either an intervalometer or a software program for shooting multiple subexposures.


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#3 Hesiod

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 03:11 AM

Big sensor is nice but, as Bobzeq25 pointed out, it may end more pricey (full frame lenses are the expensive "pro" lines).
However, IMHO, if can afford the full frame go for it.
Bulb mode on the other hand is IMHO a staple: with modern cameras and fast lenses can get results at 30" but once start to use a slow telescope risk to have all the subs underexposed

#4 spereira

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 07:16 AM

Moving to DSLR & Digital Camera Astro Imaging & Processing.

 

smp



#5 sg6

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 07:16 AM

Will add that finding "B" on a DSLR can be sort of "not easy".

Mine is, if I recall, under the Aperture option, and to see it you have to be in Manual or something but not Auto or Program - which you shouldn't be in anyway for AP..

 

Before you ge a DSLR could be useful to check if B is an option. Many DSLR's are now set such that they determine everything for you and in that case B is not an option.

 

You will also need to get a DSLR where the noise reduction feature can be turned off.



#6 Huangdi

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 07:37 AM

Will add that finding "B" on a DSLR can be sort of "not easy".
Mine is, if I recall, under the Aperture option, and to see it you have to be in Manual or something but not Auto or Program - which you shouldn't be in anyway for AP..

Before you ge a DSLR could be useful to check if B is an option. Many DSLR's are now set such that they determine everything for you and in that case B is not an option.

You will also need to get a DSLR where the noise reduction feature can be turned off.

I haven't heard of a single modern dslr that doesn't have bulb mode. Usually you can find it by extending the shutter speed beyond 30sec in Manual mode. As you said yourself, manual mode is the only mode that should be used in AP..

Regarding OP's question, many full frame DSLR's have bigger pixels than aps-c cameras, which gives you higher Snr at the cost of fine details.

There is one big caveat to it. And that is the image circle. Most telescopes with a 2" focuser will have severe vignetting and not support a full frame camera. In general, you won't find a cheap refractor (let's say under 600€) that will support a full frame DSLR.

Edited by Huangdi, 01 July 2020 - 07:43 AM.


#7 OldManSky

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 08:15 AM

I haven't heard of a single modern dslr that doesn't have bulb mode. 

The Nikon D3xxx series.  No bulb mode. :(



#8 Huangdi

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 08:45 AM

The Nikon D3xxx series. No bulb mode. :(


Uhm.. I've been using a Nikon D3300 for 4 years now and I can 100% say that it has a bulb mode :p

It doesn't have sdk support which doesn't allow most software to control it in bulb mode (such as sgp, bynikon, Nina, etc) but even that can be worked around.

I can control my camera through digicamcontrol and it works just fine.

That being said if I had known the software issue of the D3xxx series, I would've bought a 5300 :p
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#9 proa

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 10:16 AM

Folks: this is all tremendously helpful. My sole interest is in spectroscopy. I have just this morning learned that I would need a DSLR that passes H-alpha, as is the case also for DSO. These specialized DSLR cameras are as expensive as a 16" Macbook Pro laptop, which I'd use much more. I'm satisfied with a P&S camera for general use.

 

I have no laptop at present, so a budget DSLR like a Nikon D3500 seemed a good way to move images from my backyard telescope to my Mac desktop.

 

QUESTION 1: should I instead get an uncooled monochrome ZWO ?

 

QUESTION 2: Can I trust that the ZWO software supports macOS Catalina 10.15.5? (I would rather not buy a Windows laptop.)

 

QUESTION 3: Have you any experience with RSpec running on a Mac in a Windows partition under Parallels?

 

 

My scope is a Takahashi CN212, which I'd use in the true f/12.4 Cassegrain mode. The aperture is 212 mm. It's mounted on a Losmandy GM8 without the Gemini Go To.

 

This all started out when I picked up a used copy of Chandrasekhar for $7, and thought it would be nice to see some stellar astrophysics.

 

--everybody, thanks again

 

Andrew


Edited by proa, 01 July 2020 - 11:09 AM.


#10 Hesiod

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 11:16 AM

Which kind of spectrograph are you planning to use?

Take note that should try to match the system's sampling to take full advantage of the spectrograph's resolution.

Also, not all the DSOs have a meaningful emission in h-alpha; however, but it is just my guess, you want a camera with a spectral response as uniform as possible along all the spectrum of interest (that to avoid nasty calibration work).



#11 erictheastrojunkie

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 12:41 PM

I would NOT get an uncooled mono astro cam, the potential for severe amp glow to affect your image without being able to precisely calibrate it out with dark frames is way too high. It'll be especially hard to learn and use for a beginner, not to mention more pricey most likely. 

 

With your telescope you are only going to be able to do lunar/solar and planetary imaging, perhaps some VERY bright targets in the DSO realm which will require very short exposures. Honestly I'd look at a used Nikon D5300/D5500, it'll give you the most flexibility in terms of software connectivity, ease of use, and price. I've bought multiple D5300's over the years, they go for about $300 on the used side, you can even pick up modified ones for $400-500. 



#12 mmalik

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 12:56 PM

Astro settings here.... Regards

 

 

Note: Cooled DSLR/MILC info here...; skip rounded offs.



#13 TelescopeGreg

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 06:53 PM

The Nikon D3xxx series.  No bulb mode. frown.gif

Nikon D3200 here, definitely has bulb.  What it doesn't have is support for Bulb over USB from the computer. 

 

I use bulb with an intervalometer, and that works just fine.




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