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Need thoughts my milky way stacking.

astrophotography beginner dslr tripod
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#1 dragorom7

dragorom7

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 09:11 PM

Hello,

 

I live in a Class 7 City, and yesterday I decided to shoot 24 x 20 seconds exposures of the milky way at iso 5000, with a 18mm and 3.5 Aperture lens and a Nikon D5600, without a Star-Tracker.

 

I used the program "Sequator" for the stacking of my raw files, it removed most of the light pollution.

I noticed there is a few star trails if I zoom my image, and I also saw there is a big part of the background that is blue, and a small blue patch at the tree below the milky way.

I wonder if that is normal, maybe because I shot it at 3:40 am, or it's an issue with the stacking?

 

(I've had this camera for like a week.)

 

 

Sorry for low quality, it had to be 500kb or less.

milkyway_01072020_jpg.jpg

 

Is this nice results for a "class 7" sky?



#2 lakeorion

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Posted 02 July 2020 - 05:47 AM

Actually doesn't look bad.  One problem you may be facing is you are trying to combine moving and stationary things.  The sky is moving, that's why we have tracking mounts.  The trees are stationary.  My guess is that's why you still have trails.  Try again with no foreground and see if the software does a better job of stacking without large blue artifacts.

 

All those shots of a foreground and bright pinpoint stars are a lie composition of different images.

 

If you are not tracking, you still can take interesting shots of the stars - let them trail and combine multiple images to form a star trails picture.

2018-05-18 Double Arch a small.jpg
In reality, my image is also a lie composition of multiple images, the arch was taken in twilight and the sky later when the stars came out.  But the concept is valid.  The camera did not move, neither did the arch (well relative to each other), the sky did.

 




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