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GSO 10" f/12 CC-10A

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#1 bluesilver

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 02:58 AM

Hi,  first time posting on here so please bear with me if i have posted in the wrong section.

 

I am hoping to find out some reviews or opinions this unit from GSO

I did see someone on here had one,  but for some reason i can't find it again,  tried the search function, but no luck unfortunately.

It is a truss tube design,  the dealer here has it listed as GSO 10" f/12 Serrurier CC-10A

You can get the smaller 8" version 8" f/12 Cassegrain and this has the solid tube design.

Here is a link to what the scope is from another inernational dealer in case i have got everyone confused.

 

https://agenaastro.c...truss-tube.html

 

What i am mainly interested to find out / learn is how it perform visually wise on the planets.

I have heard great reviews on the 8" solid tube version.

 

So basically wanted to know how it compares to the 8" version visually.

 

Then the next question is,  will the Skywatcher AZ-EQ6 handle this scope ok?

 

Any information / advise would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

 



#2 ArneN

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 03:23 AM

That ad also includes a test report from S&T. Scroll down to downloads and read Dennis’ good review.

 

Arne



#3 macdonjh

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 07:30 AM

bluesilver,

 

Welcome to Cloudy Nights.

 

If you are new to astronomy in general, not just new to Cloudy Nights, a classical Cassegrain may be frustrating for you.  Since you're looking at a large-ish scope, I will skip any discussion about refractors.  Both Schmidt Cassegrains and Newtonians are easier to collimate, in my experience, than a classical Cassegrain.  None of the three designs will provide sharp views unless it is properly collimated.  Don't get me wrong, I like classical Cassegrains and my two most used scopes are CCs.  

 

There are a couple of quite involved threads here about classical Cassegrains.  You can search for "CFF", "New AT" and I think "AT-10" to find them.

 

Based on weight alone, I think the GSO 10" will be right at the edge of what the EQ-6 can handle.  It should work if you are careful about balance when you set up, but you may find the pair shakey during use.


Edited by macdonjh, 03 July 2020 - 07:34 AM.


#4 bluesilver

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 04:37 PM

Thanks for the replies,  Yes i should of mentioned that i currently have a 16" Skywatcher Dobsonian on a goto mount.

I was only thinking about going with the GSO 10" as i have heard that the 8" version gives very good views of the planets and was mentioned that the 10" being a truss tube design should be just as good if not better.

 

I did start to look at refractors,  but from the information i was able to find it kind of led me to believe i would get better results visual wise from the GSO 10"

 

The Dobsonian gives great views also,  but i am looking for a more dedicated planet viewing scope.

 

I was fairly sure there was somone on here that got one and was doing a review on it,  just can't seam to find it again.

Will give the search function another go also.



#5 bluesilver

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 04:55 PM

Just thought i would update the post again sorry.

Finaly found the post.

 

https://www.cloudyni...any-owners-yet/

 

But if Refractors are a better option,  i am also interested to find out more.

Thanks.


Edited by bluesilver, 03 July 2020 - 04:56 PM.


#6 macdonjh

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 09:10 PM

My two cents:

 

If you keep your 16" Dobsonian collimated, allow it to cool properly before you do serious observing, and have it set up such that it's not a hassle to take out to use, it will make an incredible planetary scope.  You'll have the light grasp to get vivid colors, the aperture to get amazing resolution, and be able to use just about any magnification you like and still have sufficient exit pupil to have a bright view.

 

The classical Cassegrains you are looking at may be easier to take out for the evening.  But the 10", at 38 lb and the EQ-6 mount are pretty heavy so it will be a bit of a chore unless you can leave everything assembled and use something like wheely bars to move it outside.  I like using my classical Cassegrain on an equatorial mount: I get to sit down to observe.  I like that I can use simple eye pieces like Plossls and orthos and still have a well-corrected view.  I also like that I can use medium focal length eye pieces and still get high magnification.  My 8" classical Cassegrain weighs approximately twenty-five pounds and I use a Losmandy GM-8.  It takes me about five minutes to get everything out of my garage and to my spot on the driveway.

 

Unless you're looking at 5" or 6" refractors, a refractor can make a really good lunar and planetary scope.  Small, light, compact and they only require a smallish mount.  They also cool quickly if you keep it inside (I keep my scopes in my garage).  With a good ED or an apochromatic scope you won't have any false color to smear your view of Jupiter's festoons.  If your color receptors are acute (mine are lazy) you may still be able to see color with a 3" or 4" scope.  There's a reason people use refractors for grab-and- go.


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#7 macdonjh

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Posted 07 July 2020 - 08:14 AM

 

Unless you're looking at 5" or 6" refractors, a refractor can make a really good lunar and planetary scope.  Small, light, compact and they only require a smallish mount.

I think I meant refractors smaller than 5" can make really good portable/ grab-and-go lunar and planetary scopes.  5" and larger refractors make good lunar and planetary scopes, but can be as much work to set up and take down as a 16" Dobsonian.  I have a long 6" achromat, I love the view, but it is a chore to set up because I need to use my big mount for it.



#8 djcolton

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Posted 22 July 2020 - 10:34 AM

In December I purchased the 10" f/12 GSO Classical Cassegrain.  I have now put it through it paces and done a fairly definitive Ronchi test.  I used a 125 lpi grating and compared it to the results shown at https://www.telescop...g_telescope.htm at the bottom of the page.  With a slow f/12 system the test should even be more rigorous than with an f/9 as in the example.  An 1/8 th wave defect is readily visible at f/9 and even more at f/12.  I saw nothing but straight lines and no defects in the lines indicating 1/10 wave or better.  It is important to run the cooling fan and let the optics reach equilibrium before testing.  I bought this scope on sale from Agena Astroproducts for $2500.  Agena tests the optics before shipping with a Ronchi grating and an artificial star among other things.

 

I am not sure how such a telescope can be produced for the price.  It has quartz optics and carbon fiber struts.  The biggest drawback of the scope is the 33% central obstruction but still the images of Jupiter, Saturn and Mars are spectacular.  Jupiter and Saturn showed a wealth of detail including Encke's division on Saturn. Mars, even though relatively small, showed lots of detail and the south polar cap was very prominent. The focuser could be improved but is adequate with fine focus and alignment adjustment.  The scope reaches temperature equilibrium fairly quickly with the cooling fan and open design.  It is very well baffled and does not need a shroud.

 

I have it mounted on a Astro-Physics Mach 1 - it weighs about 40 lbs with finder scope and diagonal etc.  An EQ6 should handle it in equatorial single scope mode but I would not recommend using it in Alt-Az dual scope mode.


Edited by djcolton, 22 July 2020 - 10:41 AM.



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