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The Worst Part About Living in an Apartment Complex...

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#1 jt_3232

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 03:09 AM

You have to stay with your gear the whole time during your imaging session, taking your eyes off it for even 30 seconds seems scary too

 

I long for the day when I have enough money saved to buy a house. I will have a scope setup in the backyard and I will be watching TV instead of watching the mount.

 

Also, the bright lights everywhere really suck.

 

P.S. I am running out of entertaining things to do outside this humid night.


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#2 TOMDEY

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 04:08 AM

Good plan, jt! Get out of the complex and buy a house... far away, under dark skies. 1975, Rochester, NY. We lived in a nice cheap apartment over a deli next to a bar, when I was running a coater and going to night school, on the GI Bill. I ground my telescope mirror in the kitchen... came out good! Then some disadvantaged ~youth~ ripped out the cheap radio from my junky car and was about to set the car on fire with a Coke bottle filled with gasoline... guys leaving the bar chased him away. The police took a report, shrugged, and left. We moved to a suburb, then to the country... remote rural... where we enjoy living to this day. Skies are dark and the neighborhood is nice and safe here... many Amish and similar country-values folk. Where you choose to live makes all the difference.    Tom


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#3 sg6

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 04:19 AM

Sounds nice but you will still have to watch the imaging equipment. They have a habit of doing something wrong while you are sat inside watching TV, then you lose the whole run.

 

It takes a lot of work and effort and often money to have a reliable enough setup where you can leave it to run unattended.



#4 jt_3232

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 04:25 AM

Sounds nice but you will still have to watch the imaging equipment. They have a habit of doing something wrong while you are sat inside watching TV, then you lose the whole run.

 

It takes a lot of work and effort and often money to have a reliable enough setup where you can leave it to run unattended.

The one I have now is running well as I sit here and twiddle my thumbs. My target is lower in the sky so no meridian flip is needed, and it has been running great for the past two hours. I am very happy about this. However, I know as soon as I walk away the battery will die, or the cameras will glitch, or a huge gust of wind will ruin everything. I remember one time I tried parking my scope and for some reason it couldn't park... I painfully realized my camera was jammed into the mount preventing any movement. Almost a several thousand dollar mistake there.

 

 

Good plan, jt! Get out of the complex and buy a house... far away, under dark skies. 1975, Rochester, NY. We lived in a nice cheap apartment over a deli next to a bar, when I was running a coater and going to night school, on the GI Bill. I ground my telescope mirror in the kitchen... came out good! Then some disadvantaged ~youth~ ripped out the cheap radio from my junky car and was about to set the car on fire with a Coke bottle filled with gasoline... guys leaving the bar chased him away. The police took a report, shrugged, and left. We moved to a suburb, then to the country... remote rural... where we enjoy living to this day. Skies are dark and the neighborhood is nice and safe here... many Amish and similar country-values folk. Where you choose to live makes all the difference.    Tom

I look forward to it too. I'll probably end up in a Bortle 5 near my family, but that is okay. It beats the Bortle 8 at my apartment compounded by the horrific lights everywhere here. I've got much to look forward to in life.

 

JT



#5 BQ Octantis

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 04:29 AM

Nowadays, only planetary requires my constant attention. My intervalometer is what changed my life—I only go out every 20-30 minutes to manually dither over a 2-4 hour session. But the enabler is having my own enclosed backyard with a good sky view.

 

BQ



#6 Ron (Lubbock)

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 06:56 AM

I lived in a 3rd floor apartment for two years (2018-2019), in between owning houses in Texas and New York.  The worst part about the apartment was carrying a C11 Edge imaging train, a mount, three heavy batteries, and boxes of gear up and down three flights of stairs so I could drive to a decent dark site somewhere else.  Bringing over 250 lbs.of gear back up the stairs the next morning was such a delight.  I never once used my gear at the apartments, because my druggie neighbors would have been a little too curious.

 

Once I moved into my current house, which is out in the country in a decent Bortle 5/4 location, I logged 25 hours of integration time (just in June!).  I think that exceeds my total integration time for 2018-2019 combined.  If I get home from work at 8:00 PM, dead tired after a 12 hr. work day, but the sky is clear... I set up the gear on the patio.  Zero chance I'd go to a dark site on a night like that.  It adds up after a while.

 

So yes,  find a way to buy a house,  and  make dark skies and lack of tall trees top priorities!  If astrophotography is a major part of your "quality of life," it should  be a  major part of your housing decision.  The best part of it is that you will be forced to pay less for the house because  it's out in the country and away from trendy housing developments!



#7 kisstek

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 10:53 AM

You have to stay with your gear the whole time during your imaging session, taking your eyes off it for even 30 seconds seems scary too

 

I long for the day when I have enough money saved to buy a house. I will have a scope setup in the backyard and I will be watching TV instead of watching the mount.

 

Also, the bright lights everywhere really suck.

 

P.S. I am running out of entertaining things to do outside this humid night.

Uh, a backyard doesn't necessarily solve the "bright lights everywhere" problem:

 

PolarAlignment-small.jpg

 

We bought the house before I started getting into AP. Lack of foresight on my part.



#8 jt_3232

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 10:56 AM

Uh, a backyard doesn't necessarily solve the "bright lights everywhere" problem:

 

attachicon.gifPolarAlignment-small.jpg

 

We bought the house before I started getting into AP. Lack of foresight on my part.

OH man!! That breaks my heart! I'm sorry for laughing for a little bit at your misfortune.

 

At least they didn't put that up after you moved there, that would feel like a different story completely.

 

Does narrowband solve that problem?



#9 Ballyhoo

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 10:57 AM

You have to stay with your gear the whole time during your imaging session, taking your eyes off it for even 30 seconds seems scary too

 

I long for the day when I have enough money saved to buy a house. I will have a scope setup in the backyard and I will be watching TV instead of watching the mount.

 

Also, the bright lights everywhere really suck.

 

P.S. I am running out of entertaining things to do outside this humid night.

why dont you just pack your stuff up and drive to a darksite? Even with my home I do this because I live in a red /orange done and drving just 30 minutes away means the imaging time is exponentially more efficent; something like five hours of imaging time at home can be achieved in hour hour at the darksite. So really, you do not need to buy a house. Just be efficent about putting your stuff in a car and driving to a site.  I do not know how far you have to go and maybe I am lucky that literally every 10 minutes east for me in the car means better imaging. But, what city do you live in?



#10 kisstek

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 11:11 AM

OH man!! That breaks my heart! I'm sorry for laughing for a little bit at your misfortune.

 

At least they didn't put that up after you moved there, that would feel like a different story completely.

 

Does narrowband solve that problem?

AP is full of challenges. This is just one. AP is teaching me patience! And the "Serenity prayer" comes in handy on a daily basis.

 

But yes, I do a lot of narrow band due to the street light, the greater Phoenix light dome, the Moon, ..... smile.gif

 

But after putting up with it for seemingly forever, I finally got the neighbors to agree to a light shield for the street light and my wife to agree to removing the ficus tree. So now the scope is a bit to the left of where it is in the photo, and with the light shield, I can finally use my PoleMaster for polar alignment! Yippee!

 

I still can't shoot things like the Iris Nebula as they orbit too close to the street light, even with the light shield.frown.gif



#11 LCWASTRO

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 11:33 AM

Hey, I actually have this book in my big box of stuff I bring out with the scope lol. I've been through like 40% of it, still so much information. I'm not sure reading that thing come 3am is very productive grin.gif

ok! well i have yet to get my first mount so i will read all that applies to me

 

 

my mom screamed (not angerly) at me when i started printing it when she found out how many pages it was 

 

Sorry Trees!!!!!!




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