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Building a small custom observation list for tonight, in light pollution.

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#1 N3p

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 02:43 PM

We have vacation today and I took a day off on Monday too so i've got a nice 4 days to stay up late at night.. so far it was quite depressing.. I was all sleepy and everything, very bored. Then I look at the forecast for tonight and it changed my life from miserable to very rich. CLEAR SKY TONIGHT! AT LAST!!!

 

My day transformed from lazy to hyper in a matter of 5 minutes, I am preparing full steam ahead right now, I am so happy smile.gif

 

***

15 days ago I asked the people in the DSO forum to help me build a program which I could not wait to start then (It didn't happened because of clouds), that was 15 days ago but currently, it's a 98.8% moon at night and over 30 Celsius of temperature, not the same thingbawling.giftonight the ground will produce probably important turbulence as well as the full moon, so I am searching for easy bright objects only.

 

I want to drive to a calm darker spot for an observation anyways, I just need to do it and to go there.

 

If you have some special selections for me, I am listening!

 

With the same direction as my previous thread:

 

I am not looking for:

- Websites or links to somewhere else.

- Using Safari or Stellarium.

- A heavy marathon list of NGC

- Any information that is not 1 bright object you would like to observe yourself tonight for a specific reason.

 

I am looking for custom pick objects, maximum 1 or 2 objects per user, but something special and boosting your motivation, I want to share a unique experience on less things. My observation will be done with my usual 200x1000 Newtonian with tracking. My latitude is 45d Montreal.

 

***

The program must revolve around this.

- Bright open clusters.

- Star clouds.

- Bright: Red - Yellow - Orange stars

- Bright: Blue stars.

- Bright and/or easy double stars.

 

ALREADY INCLUDED:

- An observation of the full moon with my darkest color filters + a sketch.

- A fast observation of Jupiter, Saturn.

 

INCLUDED FROM MY PREVIOUS THREAD:

- Stars: Albiero, Arcturua, Antares, Alkalyropos

- Ophiuchus clusters: IC 4665, Serpents IC 4756, Oph NGC 6633

 

Feel free to suggest!


Edited by N3p, 03 July 2020 - 02:51 PM.


#2 DLuders

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 03:31 PM

As you noted, you already got plenty of suggestions in your previous topic from 13 days ago.  Nevertheless, here's one that is new:

 

COMET NEOWISE (C/2020 F3) -- It's in the Northeast (below Capella) about 5-10 degrees above the horizon, before sunrise.  Estimates for its brightness is +1 or 0 Magnitude.  smile.gif    See the story on Spaceweather.com


Edited by DLuders, 03 July 2020 - 03:32 PM.

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#3 river-z

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 03:37 PM

The constellation Lyra has several easy, interesting, beautiful double stars. It’s a small constellation and simple move about.

The double double (epsilon)
Delta
Zeta
Sheliak
Stf 2470 and stf 2474 (another double double)

And as a bonus you can observe the Ring Nebula (M57) which isn’t too hard to find just below Sheliak.
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#4 N3p

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 03:37 PM

Nice a comet!! I want to look at it! ((;

 

Thanks DLuders that's a great suggestion.


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#5 N3p

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 05:27 PM

As you noted, you already got plenty of suggestions in your previous topic from 13 days ago.  Nevertheless, here's one that is new:

 

COMET NEOWISE (C/2020 F3) -- It's in the Northeast (below Capella) about 5-10 degrees above the horizon, before sunrise.  Estimates for its brightness is +1 or 0 Magnitude.  smile.gif    See the story on Spaceweather.com

I've looked up the info to see the comet, I won't be able to see it tonight unfortunately, it's too early.



#6 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 07:35 AM

Nice a comet!! I want to look at it! ((;

 

Thanks DLuders that's a great suggestion.

 

I was able to see comet Neowise this morning.  I was skeptical and almost gave up but I was following on SkySafari and it was behind a distant mountain. 

 

But I kept looking with my 15x70 binos and all of a sudden, there it was, a real comet with a tail and all.  The moon was bright, the dawn was well on its way but there the comet was. I followed at least 20 minutes.

 

Catch it if you can.

 

Jon


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#7 N3p

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 12:03 PM

I was able to see comet Neowise this morning.  I was skeptical and almost gave up but I was following on SkySafari and it was behind a distant mountain. 

 

But I kept looking with my 15x70 binos and all of a sudden, there it was, a real comet with a tail and all.  The moon was bright, the dawn was well on its way but there the comet was. I followed at least 20 minutes.

 

Catch it if you can.

 

Jon

Oki thanks for the feedback @jon I will try.

 

I added the Comet to Stellarium, so I can track it easily from now on.
 



#8 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 12:20 PM

If you are in America, then the Lunar eclipse is tonight (beginning the evening of July 4 for USA EST).  It's a partial penumbral eclipse, but it should still probably be at the very top of any observing list of things to see tonight.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 04 July 2020 - 12:20 PM.


#9 N3p

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 09:46 PM

If you are in America, then the Lunar eclipse is tonight (beginning the evening of July 4 for USA EST).  It's a partial penumbral eclipse, but it should still probably be at the very top of any observing list of things to see tonight.

gee I am really, really a badly informed amateur astronomer. I was not aware there was an eclipse today.. It's 100% cloudy outside, perhaps it's happening right now behind the clouds.. I can't see the moon at all behind the clouds.. could be the tree but we never know.

 

But thanks Nicole Sharp... I'll look at the pictures in the picture forums..

 

***

OBSERVATION REPORT:

I went to the dark spot last evening and spent 3 hours there, the moon was heavy.. I could not remember the last time I did an observation with the full moon (98.8%), but it's refreshing my memory, it was like a day time observation lol.gif I enjoyed it anyways.. the temperature was ideal and the spot was very calm. 

 

MOON:

Examined with my trusty and favorite 24mm Explore scientific 68d and and my favorite moon filter that is the 38a Dark blue, the contrasts were interesting, the terminator was so thin.. I was not inspired to sketch anything from the moon. At 22:00 the best power I could put on the natural satellite was about 111x, with a 9mm Ccel lx. Even at 111x the views were soft a little.

 

JUPITER AND SATURN: Then I switched to Jupiter which was at around 13 degrees from the ground, wink.gif  a round white blob but the views improved over the night.. there was a lot of ground turbulence in the beginning. My best bet was with the 9mm again.. 111x, but even that was "stretching" things up really. Eventually the resolution and contrast improved and the great spot was visible, I tried a 7mm Fujiyama with a Baader Neodymium filter, nothing very stunning but I have no regrets after all.

 

Saturn was lower but the views were nice with my 24mm 68d again, the light pollution with the low transparency were not playing in my favor.. almost all the stars in the field of view were very faint. The planet was well defined.. at 42x. Again, it's better to get a clean wide field low power view then nothing at all.

 

(In my logs I've got swear words about the moon, smirk.gif  I like to swear in my logs.)

 

CASSIOPEIA: I switched to Cas to look at the stars around Caph and Schedir. Schedir and "Eta" 2 nice yellow stars, double too. Then I went up a bit up to see the Garnet star along with another favorite of mine, a  yellow star, inside of Cepheus, in the middle denser part, there are 2 yellow stars there actually not just one but one is nicer and richer then the other. I like this yellow star because it's magnitude is bellow the coma threshold of my telescope, so it's very pinpoint but still a bright star. It's yellow for me, not orange, not beige, yellow like Urine after one took vitamins.

 

I don't know which one it is exactly and my Stellarium is obviously corrupted, not to say dead. I have the stars from another planet.. or the stars of the south.. It's doing serious free games to me right now.

 

BOOTES: Ah yes! I looked at the nice bright, unequal double Alkalurops, great target. According to my memory, I remember a bluish tint for both of these stars, certainly one of the nicest target in Bootes. This one was a suggestion from a person in my previous thread. Finally I looked at Arcturus too, which is the first bright star I looked at trough my first 130mm Newtonian telescope. Arcturus is a special star for me because of that and perhaps it's the first star where I noticed a distinct color beige, orange.

 

Before I bought my telescope, I was NOT aware of the Kelvin scale of color for the stars, so this was fantastic then and it all started with Arcturus.

 

Hopefully some motivation was transmitted with this report!

 

 

 

 

 


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#10 payner

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Posted 06 July 2020 - 02:35 PM

If you have not observed Izar (Epsilon Bootis), you need to treat yourself.




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