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The joy of a good, small refractor

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#101 vdog

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 12:23 PM

I would have considered last night's skies just ok in the spring, but last night I found them joyous indeed as I was finally able to get in a good session with the Televue 76 I bought a month ago.   I was out just after midnight and the moon was still setting, but the contrast was sharp and crisp, and clusters like M38 and M35 just popped.  Even M42 was impressive in that scope, both with and without filters. 

 

Even used, this scope was a significant expenditure for me, but now I'm finally starting to see where that money went.  I'm glad I went "big" on this one.


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#102 25585

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 12:58 PM

Would a TV 85 be OK on an AZ GTI mount, or too heavy?



#103 BillP

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 01:37 PM

The Vixen has been the scope of choice recently, especially for having a quick, early morning view of Mars.

 

I agree....that little 81S is wonderful as it is ready in a moment's notice for anything.  It always surprises me too at how well it can do across a broad range of targets.  With all small apertures also, they really can seem to punch beyond their weight with careful attention to the eyepiece.  As example, good detailed views of Globs can be difficult with a small aperture, but when using a specialty eyepiece like a Supermonocentric in an 80mm class scope, very easy to see a well populated sprinkling of individual star points right across the core.  So very satisfying.  And again with careful attention to the eyepiece, even planetary at 200x shows a rich array of details on Jupiter and Mars, so way more than simply a few belts or maria, and instead many additional features as well as good edge details on all the features.
 


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#104 25585

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 05:09 PM

Does the 81S have a 2" visual back? My A80M does not.



#105 dUbeni

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 05:29 PM

Does the 81S have a 2" visual back? My A80M does not.

It doesn't come with one but you can attach a 2" adapter either from Vixen, or even a better one from Baader. It has a M60 x1 thread on the draw tube.


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#106 25585

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 06:08 PM

It doesn't come with one but you can attach a 2" adapter either from Vixen, or even a better one from Baader. It has a M60 x1 thread on the draw tube.

Thanks. Would there be any vignetting with a 40mm 70° eyepiece?



#107 dUbeni

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 07:16 PM

Thanks. Would there be any vignetting with a 40mm 70° eyepiece?

Whoops! My ED80S is a f/9 (720mm FL), slightly longer than the ED81S, but I wouldn't think so. I do have a 42mm 65º AFOV eyepiece that I've rarely used, mostly because in my light polluted sky at home the background sky becomes to bright. A 40mm eyepiece will have around 5 mm exit pupil on the ED81S so I think you would not have vignetting issues, but don't bet on my response, I didn't try it.


Edited by dUbeni, 25 October 2020 - 07:17 PM.

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#108 sunnyday

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 08:51 PM

here are my two g & g all depends on the time of day.

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#109 wxcloud

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Posted 02 November 2020 - 05:56 PM

Since everyone is sharing pics, I just popped in the massive 2" diagonal into my ZenithStar 61 and figured I'd take a new pic smile.gif

 

A bit bummed I can't seem to get the binoviewer to work with it (yet?)

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#110 barbie

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Posted 03 November 2020 - 01:25 PM

Last night I was reminded yet again of the joy of a good, small refractor when I took my Skywatcher 72mm ED apo out into the chilly evening for some planet observing. Mars,Jupiter and Saturn looked marvelous at 168X with my Vixen 2.5mm SLV eyepiece!! The Tak TOE's also did quite excellently as well!!  Thermal acclimatization took virtually no time away from an otherwise brief but rewarding observing session!! The joy of a good, small refractor at its finest!


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#111 t.r.

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Posted 06 November 2020 - 09:45 AM

You have inspired me to set aside the big guns for a romp with the Jason 313 tonight! Mars Jupiter Saturn here we come!
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#112 daquad

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Posted 06 November 2020 - 09:48 AM

Do they have to be good?  Jaegers 2" f/7.5 cemented objective 3.1 degree field at 15X.  Ultra G&G. "Splits" the double double at 100X.  Nice views of Luna at 50X.   

 

52X390 Jaegers.JPG

 

Dom Q.

 

 

 

 


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#113 aa6ww

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Posted 10 November 2020 - 12:36 PM

I had this little 50mm F/12 Meade for a while. It was impressive how well it worked with ES 1-25" eyepieces. It was so tiny on my CG-4. I bought it out of curiosity but it was in excellent shape and was surprisingly sharp. I tried to use it for a while on my APM-152 and a 50mm finder but it was more for aesthetics then practicality.

It was the best 50mm refractor I've ever had and just smoked the little Stellarvue 50mm Sparrow as a 50mm refractor.

As cute and fun as it was, I don't miss it. All my 50mm / 60mm scopes were replaced with a small Vintage FC-60 Tak.

 

...Ralph 

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Edited by aa6ww, 10 November 2020 - 07:48 PM.

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#114 Brian Schmidt

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Posted 11 November 2020 - 12:16 PM

I've enjoyed looking through your posts and pictures, but I'm curious to know if anyone has any recommendations for an easy to use mount for my ED 80.  Currently using the exos II mount, but there's definitely a hassle factor and learning curve to setting up that mount between leveling (level ground is in short suply here), polar aligning, then getting the computer set up with location and alignment, etc....  There's no manual motions on the mount.  So I usually end up using my 8 f/6 eq to just roll out of the garage as my "grab and go".  I find one of the best things about that scope is being able to put in the 35 pan in that scope, then also looking at the same object in my 12 inch under dark skies and enjoying the different views.  But at the house I end up just opting for something else due to the hassle factor of the mount.  I may end up trying to make another "dob" type mount, but that has that seems to limit the eyepieces I can use.  The scope is pretty easy to rebalance on the eq mount. I'd probably use this a lot more if I had a mount that was easier to use.


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#115 LDW47

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Posted 11 November 2020 - 01:10 PM

I've enjoyed looking through your posts and pictures, but I'm curious to know if anyone has any recommendations for an easy to use mount for my ED 80.  Currently using the exos II mount, but there's definitely a hassle factor and learning curve to setting up that mount between leveling (level ground is in short suply here), polar aligning, then getting the computer set up with location and alignment, etc....  There's no manual motions on the mount.  So I usually end up using my 8 f/6 eq to just roll out of the garage as my "grab and go".  I find one of the best things about that scope is being able to put in the 35 pan in that scope, then also looking at the same object in my 12 inch under dark skies and enjoying the different views.  But at the house I end up just opting for something else due to the hassle factor of the mount.  I may end up trying to make another "dob" type mount, but that has that seems to limit the eyepieces I can use.  The scope is pretty easy to rebalance on the eq mount. I'd probably use this a lot more if I had a mount that was easier to use.

A Porta II AZ mount, I exchanged my 3 VersaGo AZ’s for 3 Porta’s, it was a good move it is just so much smoother ! Use my ED 80 and other various refractors up to 127mm on them with no problems, they are very portable and solidly built.


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#116 Brian Schmidt

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Posted 11 November 2020 - 05:11 PM

Cool.  I’ll check into those.



#117 BlueMoon

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Posted 11 November 2020 - 05:19 PM

+1 for the Porta II AZ head. It's been reliable, smooth on the axis movements and trouble-free. A couple of mods I made. As I prefer the weight of my scopes to bear down on the saddle, I fabricated a simple aluminum L bracket attached it directly to the altitude hub (removed the stock Vixen saddle) and added a WO Vixen saddle. I also replaced the stock axis control knobs with some flexible cable types. It's become the (mostly) permanent perch for my SW 72ED APO scope. "Grab n go" bliss. waytogo.gif

 

Clear skies.

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Edited by BlueMoon, 11 November 2020 - 08:44 PM.

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#118 YktwnCVS10

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Posted 12 November 2020 - 08:37 PM

Hello everybody,

 

My first telescope was a 2.4" refractor (is that 60mm?) and that was decades ago. I was so thrilled at seeing the rings of Saturn,  Jupiter, and the craters on the moon, I never let a prism-like color going all the way around the edge of the moon bother me one bit. (I didn't know at the time that there was a name for that, "chromatic aberration.")

 

I recently bought a 70mm refractor for my granddaughter for a Christmas present. This will be her first telescope, too (except for a toy one she got for her birthday once). It will be her first time to see those things I mentioned above. I don't think CA just around the fringe of the moon will distract her too much, but I have to admit that I worry about it being more than just that. Does anybody know what the chances are of getting a scope with CA these days that's more serious than that? I don't want her first look at the moon and Jupiter and Saturn to be spoiled by too much CA.


Edited by YktwnCVS10, 12 November 2020 - 08:38 PM.

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#119 Kim K

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Posted 12 November 2020 - 09:24 PM

Try a green filter. A #58 pretty much kills CA; albeit, you end up with a green image. I used one in an ST80 and Jupiter's band were very visible.

Kim
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#120 LDW47

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Posted 12 November 2020 - 09:39 PM

Hello everybody,

 

My first telescope was a 2.4" refractor (is that 60mm?) and that was decades ago. I was so thrilled at seeing the rings of Saturn,  Jupiter, and the craters on the moon, I never let a prism-like color going all the way around the edge of the moon bother me one bit. (I didn't know at the time that there was a name for that, "chromatic aberration.")

 

I recently bought a 70mm refractor for my granddaughter for a Christmas present. This will be her first telescope, too (except for a toy one she got for her birthday once). It will be her first time to see those things I mentioned above. I don't think CA just around the fringe of the moon will distract her too much, but I have to admit that I worry about it being more than just that. Does anybody know what the chances are of getting a scope with CA these days that's more serious than that? I don't want her first look at the moon and Jupiter and Saturn to be spoiled by too much CA.

From my experience with scopes from 60mm to 127mm she will hardly be concerned with it, in most cases it is hardly noticeable unless you are a perfectionist or are phobic !


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#121 BlueMoon

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Posted 12 November 2020 - 09:44 PM

 

From my experience with scopes from 60mm to 127mm she will hardly be concerned with it, in most cases it is hardly noticeable

The quality of optical glass has improved immensely over the years. CA is hardly an issue these days even in relatively fast scopes. I'd lay odds there is little to be concerned about.

 

Clear skies.


Edited by BlueMoon, 12 November 2020 - 10:23 PM.

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#122 YktwnCVS10

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 10:12 AM

Thank you very much  .. I appreciate your thoughts more than you know.



#123 jcj380

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 07:10 PM

Try a green filter. A #58 pretty much kills CA; albeit, you end up with a green image. I used one in an ST80 and Jupiter's band were very visible.

Kim

I have an old green "moon filter".  I'll have to try that, maybe tonight.



#124 daquad

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 07:41 PM

I have an old green "moon filter".  I'll have to try that, maybe tonight.

But then the moon will look green.  Better to have a little CA than a green moon.

 

Dom Q.


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#125 Haydon

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 10:31 PM

But then the moon will look green.  Better to have a little CA than a green moon.

 

Dom Q.

That’s funny  




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