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The Launch of The Cubble Space Telescope

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#1 AstroCub

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 09:08 PM

Hi and nice to meet you. This is my first thread. I live in the USA but am British, from London. I am a telecope beginner but have been into astronomy my whole life. I have recently decided to buy a telescope and have a few questions regarding that. Up until now I have been using 10 x .50 binoculars, heeding the advice the late Sir Patrick Moore once gave me in person - "buy binoculars, not that cheap rubbish they sell in Woolworths" 

 

So, my I chose Celestron as my brand for the mount and the telescope. 

 

I was going to get the Celestron 9.25" SCT with the Edge optics, married to a CGEM II mount. The Cubble Space Telescope

 

The problem I founfd was that the CGEM mount was far too heavy for me. It really is a dead weight and quite a handful if you're not used to lifting heavy items.Far be it for a beginner like me to give advice but really, if weight could be an issue for you, try and test these items in the flesh before purchase if at all possible. 

 

In fact the CGEM mount was so heavy that I have sent it back, along with the OTA. 

 

So I re-thought my initial choices for telescope and mount. 

 

I am instead going to buy the Advanced VX mount, which weighs 20 lbs lighter than the CGEM. Goodness knows how people cope with the CGXL mounts, although they are things of beauty to me.heart.png

 

So I have the mount sorted out My question is about the telescope itself

 

I know this question has been asked many times before - but - for a beginner like me, do you think / feel the $800 difference between the 'plain' Celestron 9.25" CST and the 9.25" CST with Edge optics is worth the difference in money? I do want to try and observe anything in the sky that I can, planets, galaxies etc. Photography wise, I was thinking of getting a Celestron NexImgae, but mainly for the convenience of being able to view the image from the telescope on my laptop on cold nights. 

 

So - should the Cubble Space Telescope be the Celestron plain 9.25" or the 9.25" with Edge optics. Are the Edge optics worth the $800 difference?

(Celestron 9.25" with VX mount = $2,099 9.25" Edge optics with VX mount = $2,899 ) 

 

Money is not a massive issue for me - I just don't want to spend an extra $800 for a possible very marginal difference.

 

Thanks for any thoughts or advice.  heart.png


Edited by AstroCub, 05 July 2020 - 08:45 AM.


#2 osbourne one-nil

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Posted 05 July 2020 - 03:31 AM

Morning - Woolworths....Patrick Moore....those were the days!

 

Are you wanting to image? I ask simply because I've never got on with equatorial mounts and wouldn't want one unless I had a specific reason, as the eyepiece can end up in all sort of weird locations. It's not so bad with a SCT telescope as they're short and the eyepiece is at the end but it all depends what you have in mind?



#3 Hesiod

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Posted 05 July 2020 - 04:33 AM

The EdgeHDs have, well, better defined "edges": their corrector flatten and enlarge the coma-free area of the field.

This is nice for some instances (especially deep sky imaging with largish sensors, observing with 2" eyepieces, making Moon mosaics), but much less useful for others (e.g. planetary observation/imaging; stargazing with 1.25" eyepieces).

They have also some mechanical improvements, but their actual worthiness and usefulness is matter of debate.

 

The fact is, if are inclined toward long-exposure astrophotography of faint objects (galaxies, etc...) in my opinion the C9.25 is undermounted on the AVX, so I would scale down the tube as well to a C8, or look to another mount (iOptron and Vixen mounts are lighter if compared to their Celestron's counterparts, even if more expensive)



#4 sg6

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Posted 05 July 2020 - 04:47 AM

If absolute beginner go buy a small achro, around 80mm.

Put it on the mount and get outside and just look at whatever takes your fancy.

Later get a bigger/better scope.

 

The AVX seems an odd mount. They either work or they don't. No middle ground so will depend on which flavour you get.

 

You are sort of jumping in big. My opinion is not the best way.

 

Have found I don't take big scopes anywhere if I can help it. Just a real pain to set up. Might look nice on paper, and on forums. Reality is otherwise. There will be a lot more happy people with 60/72/80 ED's then with 925 SCT's.

 

Have said read assorted threads of people kind of discontent with an SCT even with big Newtonians, cannot recall of one with a good apo refractor. Even a small apo refractor.

 

Was once asked here: "Do you see more with an 80mm refractor or a 10" reflector?"

Replies were about 50/50. You can see a lot in an 80mm some loss of objects, but you tend to take an 80mm out a lot more and use it. 4 nights with an 80mm beat 1 night with a 10".

 

Doubt that the AVX will be sufficent for a 925, hasn't the weight capacity. A 925 is not lightweight either, and with a scope you have to lift it up and position it. Club here would use 3 people to set up a 925 - 2 to carry, one to direct and get it placed by the 2 carrying on the mount, then they tighten up before the carriers release.


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#5 Tony Flanders

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Posted 05 July 2020 - 05:09 AM

Up until now I have been using 10 x .50 binoculars, heeding the advice the late Sir Patrick Moore oncve gave me in person - "buy binoculars, not that cheap rubbish they sell in Woolworths"


Bad advice even then, in my opinion, and much worse advice now. Even back then that Woolworth scope would have shown glorious image of Jupiter and Saturn utterly unlike anything you can see it binoculars. In the U.S. it's now possible to get an altogether serviceable telescope for $100, and a lifetime keeper for $500.

Since size and weight are an issue for you, why don't you start with a smaller telescope? And do you really need an equatorial mount with Go To capability?

For starters, a C8 is quite a bit smaller and lighter than a C9.25, with very little loss of aperture. But have you considered something really a lot smaller, like a refractor in the 80-100 mm range or a 5-inch SCT?



#6 phillip

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Posted 05 July 2020 - 05:29 AM

I've looked often at the 925, size perhaps held me back as my ancient age.

 

You'll hear this alot but the Dob telescopes especially 8 inch just big enough for very decent viewing. Find I use an XT8i extensively. 10 inch dob a consideration as well. They certainly can be the best bang for the buck. Save the extra money for decent eyepieces. 

 

Yes a small Refractor rated with good optics will show quite alot, lighter on the fainter deep sky is all.

 

If your near my area I'd be over in a flash to check out the 9.25, just caution on its size of handling.

 

My 8 inch dob sets up immediately, rural area drop it off at a farm entry field, cradle out, tube always in my toyota trunk temp ready, 2 minutes I'm observing, piece  of Cake!

 

So many choices, find a club and check out variety that would serve you correctly! 

 

Happy Sky

 

Etx90

XT8i, XT10 Dobs

Eyepieces  30mm & 10mm Baader, 8mm Paris Clave, 7.5mm Pentax, Takahashi orthos 6mm & 4mm

Televue Nagler 4.8mm


Edited by phillip, 05 July 2020 - 05:34 AM.


#7 osbourne one-nil

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Posted 05 July 2020 - 05:51 AM

I've settled on an 8" dob as the ultimate telescope for me...and I've been through a few in my time. Worth considering because you're going to get one at some point, I can almost guarantee it! 



#8 JOEinCO

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Posted 05 July 2020 - 10:31 AM

I agree with others that the C9.25 is way too much for the AVX.

 

I'm inclined to suggest a two-scope plan that falls well under the cost of the OP's original C9.25/CGEM purchase: The C8, for the reasons Tony mentioned. And a wide field refractor to compliment it.

 

The refractor doesn't need to be an expensive apochromat because it's for larger, dimmer targets. The C8 gets used on the planets, Moon, binary stars and small clusters like globulars and distant open clusters. So something like an ST120, which will ride solidly on the AVX, gives you sweeping views no C9.25 or C8 can dream of. 

 

AVX Mount

C8 OTA

ST120 OTA

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#9 dustyc

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Posted 05 July 2020 - 12:27 PM

Former Edge scope owner here. Unless you are going to image with a full sized chip and the proper mount, get the regular 9.25. Sure the clean star field at the edge is nice, but with a tracking mount to keep the target centered the plain scope is fine.



#10 AstroCub

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Posted 06 July 2020 - 08:03 AM

Thanks to everyone who replied to my thread and for your thoughts / advice. I really do apprciate that. 

 

I have decided to go with the 9.25 CST (non Edge) mounted on a an Advanced VX mount. I got the 9.25 to give myself plenty of aperture to grow into and the VX mount because of weight considerations. Other things being equal I would have gone for the CPC double fork mount. 

 

The VX is rated (conservatively) for 30lbs payload so with the OTA weighing 20lbs and a few accesories, I should be OK. 

( PS I am also purtchasing the Celestron Star Sense Explorer as a more mobile / lightweight telescope that I can move easily around my property for those times when trees get in the way ;)

 

https://www.celestro...plorer-dx-130az
 

Because of mobility issues, I plan to do most / all of my viewing (from the 9.25) via my laptop. To that end I am getting a Celestron Focus Motor, a small camera, and will be running my handcontroller hooked up to my laptop. 

 

Can anyone recommend any good software that I can use to fully control my telescope via my laptop, please? I am thinking about using Celetron's NexRemote and / or Stellarium?  


Edited by AstroCub, 06 July 2020 - 08:11 AM.


#11 Hesiod

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Posted 06 July 2020 - 09:42 AM

So you are planning to stay near the telescope, or far from it?

In the latter case I would look for a more reliable setup.

Also, if plan to use a camera, why the C9 and not something else?

The C9's naative focal is quite high so will be struck with a narrow field of view unless purchase a rather expensive full-frame or at least aps-c camera (which would call for the EdgeHD...) or the not cheap Hyperstar gadget.

Money-wise, a "photographic" 150/600 or 150/750 Newtonian sounds a better option

 

P.S. the StarSense Explorer is IMHO a really poor value, if want a smaller telescope the Heritage130/AWB OneSky, or a 150/1200 Dob make much more sense...




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