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HDR -planets in starfield?

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#1 Maxtrixbass

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Posted 07 July 2020 - 02:00 PM

Has anyone done this? I'm trying, but no success. If you have done it, how? My goal is to get a somewhat wider field with, say, Saturn and moons..and maybe a backdrop of stars.

 

I have seen Moon in starfield, but pretty sure its just two different sessions, maybe even different sky, composited. If you have pulled off a crescent Moon (or more) with actual stars let me know how.

 



#2 MalVeauX

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Posted 07 July 2020 - 03:10 PM

Heya,

 

The brightness difference is between the planets and most stars is incredibly vast, and beyond the dynamic range of most common inexpensive sensors.

 

So, just like the moon shots like you describe, it will be a composite when its done. Until we have sensors with dynamic range probably greater than 16 stops or so.... (guessing on that number, I'm sure someone will calculate the difference needed an correct me shortly... ;)).

 

Very best,


Edited by MalVeauX, 07 July 2020 - 03:18 PM.


#3 Maxtrixbass

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Posted 07 July 2020 - 04:27 PM

Understood. I have tried compositing two different exposures, but have found the longer exposure via a video capture to not grab enough stars. There is the problem of the planet being so blow out that it creeps into the composit as well, so I thought I could take a somewhat longer exposure video and  "stack and stretch", but am not finding success.

 

Thought I'd check in case someone found the right recipe.

 

 

Heya,

 

The brightness difference is between the planets and most stars is incredibly vast, and beyond the dynamic range of most common inexpensive sensors.

 

So, just like the moon shots like you describe, it will be a composite when its done. Until we have sensors with dynamic range probably greater than 16 stops or so.... (guessing on that number, I'm sure someone will calculate the difference needed an correct me shortly... wink.gif).

 

Very best,

 




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