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CCD camera recommendations for 10"SCT F8

astrophotography imaging
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#1 bcotop

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 07:06 AM

Hi all,

 

I was looking for a decent first CCD camera and there are many variables to consider so I was looking for someone with more experience than I to make some recommendations please. 

 

Below is my setup.

 

Meade LX850 mount 

Meade F8 10" Catadioptric Telescope with Ultra-High Transmission Coatings (UHTC), Focal Length 2032mm

 

I am mainly interested in imaging deep sky faint fuzzies and looking for a color CCD camera to start with.

 

Should I be looking for a larger Chip with smaller or larger pixel size?

 

Also what software is recommended for processing.

 

I had taken the attached many years ago with a pretty cheap CCD and a 11" SCT and would like to do better and make use of the SkyTracker on the LX850.

 

Thanks for the help.

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Ring Nebula.jpg
  • Andromeda.jpg
  • Hercules Cluster.jpg
  • Orion Nebula.jpg
  • 4.jpg


#2 jhart

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 07:23 AM

Hi,

 

Not that I am experienced but I had a similar first camera question and ending up buying the ASI294MC Pro.



#3 Tapio

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 07:33 AM

You are looking at camera with larger chip and large pixels.

What is your budget ?

DSLR is a good and economical way to start.

ASI294MC Pro is good choice and so is ASI071 MC Pro.

But even with those a 0.63X reducer is highly recommended.



#4 bcotop

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 08:32 AM

Tapio,

 

I have tried a Cannon EOS DSLR with mixed results. The image is supper tiny.

 

I was thinking somewhere around 500-600 for the budget. 

 

So you recommend using a .63X reducer/flattener  as well. Do you have a specific one that you would recommend.

 

Jhart, 

 

I'll look into the ASI294MC Pro. Have you enjoyed using it?



#5 Tapio

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 08:55 AM

DSLR and tiny image - I don't understand this.

As for focal reducer, Celestron, Meade or Antares will work (avoid older Meade if second hand).

#6 bcotop

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 09:17 AM

Tapio, by tiny I mean that when I look at the image on the DSLR, I have to zoom way in to even see what it is. Is that normal.



#7 Tapio

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 10:17 AM

Well it depends on the target but DS targets taken with 2000 mm usually are big.
But because it's a slow scope you have use long exposure time to have a decent image.

#8 dhaval

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 10:21 AM

There are a couple of things that you're asking - 1) image resolution and 2) Field of View (FOV).

 

Most galaxies are small, a larger FOV is not really what you need for that, unless you want to capture what's around the galaxy. Image resolution will give you the details in the object that you're imaging and depends on pixel size of the camera, focal length of the scope and your local seeing conditions - not on FOV. The point being, even with a larger FOV, if you have the right pixel size, focal length and seeing conditions then you will see the same amount of details as you would in a smaller FOV image.

 

If you have excellent seeing conditions, then by all means, go with smaller pixels - that will give you high resolution. If not, it is best to stay with medium to large pixels and under sample, you won't have as many details, but that is a function of your seeing at that point. The size of the chip for FOV, just ensure you pick a size that works for you.

 

CS!


Edited by dhaval, 13 July 2020 - 10:24 AM.


#9 bcotop

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 10:50 AM

Thanks all, I'll have to take a look at what's in my price range.

 

I was also looking for a focal reducer. But from Googleing it looks like the standard the 6.3 from Meade/Celestron/Antares/Hirsch will not work on my Meade F/8 ACF. You would think that Meade would have a reducer for their own ACF scopes, but apparently they do not.



#10 Tapio

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 11:00 AM

Ah somehow I misread telescope specs.

Optec Lepus 0.62X reducer should work  - but it's about $200 I'm afraid.


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#11 dhaval

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 12:37 PM

I agree with Tapio - the Optec Lepus will work with this scope as well as the AP27TVPH. 

 

CS!



#12 bcotop

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 12:43 PM

Thanks all for the input.

 

Do these FL reducers require any adapters to connect to the scope or a CCD camera.



#13 Tapio

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 01:53 PM

There is a specific back focus distance required for each reducer.

Here's a diagram for Lepus:
https://www.optecinc...s_backfocus.pdf

 

There are adapters for it and it depends on the camera you are using - each camera has specific flange distance.

https://www.optecinc...lepus/19407.htm



#14 bcotop

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 02:06 PM

Thanks



#15 bcotop

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 08:12 AM

Hi All,

 

Just wanted to provide a follow up. I priced out using the AP27TVPH and it requires all the below for my Meade F/8 ACF.

 

To start, you will need to replace the visual back on the Meade with the ADASCTLM27.  https://www.astro-ph....com/adasctlm27
·         Next comes the 27TVPH.  https://www.astro-physics.com/27tvph
·         Then you can add a 2.7” extension or two.   Extensions increase compression, but decrease the size of the fully illuminated circle.  You don’t need any extensions for the 27TVPH to work at ~85-90% compression.   You might want to start with none, and then add something like the A3504-A (1.25”) after you’ve done a bit of imaging.  SCT’s don’t follow the rules for easy compression calculation, but I wouldn’t try to get too much, or focus becomes a problem.  https://www.astro-physics.com/a350
·         Then comes the 2.7” to 2” adapter – the ADA2003A.  https://www.astro-physics.com/ada2003a
·         The last piece is the PFCLEOS camera adapter.  https://www.astro-physics.com/pfcleos

 

All in all 5 separate pieces to use my DSLV at a cost of $572. YIKES. I'm going to see what I come up with using the Lepus and see if it comes out any cheaper. Sure wish Meade would make a telecommuter for their own ACF tubes.




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