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What would you observe with a 30" scope?

dso observatory observing
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#1 Luca Brasi

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 01:31 PM

I've just booked a night at the Gunnison Valley Observatory.  My largest scope is a 14" Dob, but I'm really curious about what I can see with a 30"...

 

What targets would you observe if you had one night with a 30" scope?  What targets would really shine in a 30" scope with a longer focal ratio, versus my 14" with a short focal ratio?

 

I'll be observing in mid August, and planets are an obvious target.  I look forward to your responses!



#2 Bataleon

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 01:33 PM

Fainter DSO! Personally, I'd be in nebula heaven with aperture like that.

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#3 chrysalis

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 01:41 PM

Ring Nebula and other planetaries:

 

Attached File  Summer Planetary.xls   26KB   26 downloads

 

Attached File  Fall Planetary.xls   27KB   14 downloads

 

Whatever galaxies and globular clusters you can - if seeing is excellent, try for Palomar GCs.


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#4 spereira

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 01:47 PM

Moving to Deep Sky Observing, for a better fit.

 

smp



#5 Codbear

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 01:49 PM

I have a 24", which the 30" gathers about 56% more light than, so in the ballpark.

 

My favorite targets in the summer are M13, M57, M3, M51, M27, NGC 6826, and right now NGC 4457 to catch the supernova.

 

If it's a clear shot, anything in Scorpio and Sagittarius would be awesome.


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#6 havasman

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 01:50 PM

#1 - your favorite object now in the sky

 

Then PN & Globulars as they'll be transformed.

 

NGC6946 but that's 'cause it's MY favorite.

 

Arps and Hickson Clusters.


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#7 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 02:00 PM

I would mix it up. Go after your favorites and pick some difficult objects that are beyond the reach of your 14 inch.

 

I'd definitely do Stephan's quintet, it was pretty awesome in my 25 inch, should be better in the 30.

 

I find that in a 20 inch plus scope, I spend most of the time looking at faint galaxies, you might pick a few very distant galaxies, something beyond a billion light years. 

 

Jon



#8 Enkidu

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 02:14 PM

Lensed quasars


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#9 TOMDEY

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 02:16 PM

I've heavily used a 29-incher in a dome for a couple of decades, and now the 36, all visual. A local operator will be with you guys, right? A full night will blow by pretty fast. I'd recommend almost exclusively Deep Sky for the 30", to take advantage of the dark skies and light grasp. Starting with familiar favorites and progressing to more and more challenging targets that actually require that aperture. Hopefully, the participants will be mostly experienced observers, everyone dark-adapted and protocol savvy. Most people either show up entirely unprepared, or with plans that far over-reach the allotted time and group size.

 

I oft hosted groups (typically half a dozen experienced) here. Each person is going to want to spend quality eyepiece time on each target. Realistic is probably no more than a couple/few dozen targets. Note that six people viewing 30 targets becomes two hundred up and down the ladder, and associated target selection, acquisitions, chat... Nice to finish up with more splashy familiars... memorable.

 

The 30" will excel around 250x (bright views with decent mag) and maybe higher on some. Remote globulars, planetary nebulae, Veil, galaxies (especially groups and interacting)... I'm sure the local guy will know what will most impress.    Tom


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#10 ButterFly

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 02:16 PM

M51/101 to start off.  Most of the globs and a bunch of planetaries in between.  Then onto M33 (bring a UHC filter).  Then either the globs of M31 or get lost in the Veil.  Each will be harder to leave than the next.  Have fun!



#11 PETER DREW

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 02:20 PM

I have a 30" scope.  The obvious targets are those that would be hard to see in a smaller aperture, but believe me, if you have limited time, you will look at your usual favourites.  Objects faint enough to need a 30" are still hard to find. 


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#12 P_Myers

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 02:43 PM


Made in the USA decal stickers on the International Space Station... smile.gif
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#13 JGass

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 02:49 PM

Made in the USA decal stickers on the International Space Station... smile.gif

Why not collect them all?  9 USA modules, 4 Russia, 2 Japan, 1 Europe.


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#14 Gary Z

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 03:44 PM

A few years ago, folks from the Lubbock (South Plains Astronomy Club), brought a 30 inch GOTO Dob to Muleshoe WLF Refuge and some of us from the Clovis, NM Astronomy Club went there to view thru.  We had to use a tall stand to get to the eyepiece and after a few trips, the newness wore off.  But as for what you can see, think of seeing the dust lanes in Andromeda's Galaxy without a camera.  Yeah, it's that spectacular.  I would mix it up as much as possible including Jupiter and Saturn plus the DSOs.  As the detail you will see will stick with you forever.  

 

Care to give us a report of your visit?

 

Take care,

 

Gary



#15 edwincjones

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 03:53 PM

I would start with reviewing the Ms,

then other favorites

then some of the faint DSOs that have always interested me

 

at the end of session maybe some of the blinding planets

 

On night at NMSkies I had their 30" and tried for some of the Hicksons

but that was pushing it too far.  I enjoyed their 25" but the 30 was just

too much work with tall ladder and always having to move  the scope.

 

edj


Edited by edwincjones, 13 July 2020 - 03:58 PM.


#16 Starman1

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 07:05 PM

https://www.cloudyni...ers/?p=10334833

https://www.cloudyni...ers/?p=10334837

Two threads on same topic, so instead of a repeat, a link to my answers on the other thread.


Edited by Starman1, 13 July 2020 - 07:06 PM.

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#17 Keith Rivich

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 07:10 PM

Lensed quasar

Possibly. Einsteins cross culminates around 3am in August. Its still pretty tough in a 30" though.



#18 Keith Rivich

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 07:17 PM

+1 on mixing it up. Some hard but mostly eye candy.  Make darn sure you look at M20, M27 and  M17 with an OIII filter. Go for the central star in M57.  M22 will knock your socks off. 

 

What's on your bucket list?



#19 Astro-Master

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 11:30 PM

If the seeing is good, Planetary nebula at high power, 1,000x or more will be amazing, try for the two central stars in M57, and be sure to look at the Blue Snowball NGC 7662.

 

The compact galaxy group Hickson 79 Seyfert's Sextet NGC 6027.

IC 1101 the largest galaxy in the known universe just a few degrees from M5

My favorite galaxy pair in Pegasus NGC 7332 & 7339 at 350x or more, it really looks better at high power.

Any of the Globulars would be worthy targets.

The Galaxy NGC 253, and the Globular NGC 288 should be on you're list

 

Hope you have clear skies, and good seeing.


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#20 csrlice12

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 01:19 AM

I'd observe where I'm at on the ladder and how far it is to the ground....


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#21 Tony Flanders

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 06:25 AM

I would skip the planets. With them as low in the sky as they are, the 30-incher won't show any more detail than your 14-incher. All it will accomplish is to ruin your dark adaptation and give you a false feeling that the 30-incher is a bad telescope.


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#22 Allan Wade

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 06:26 AM

That’s a very long focal length scope, so unless they utilise 3” eyepieces, you are going to be limited to a small TFOV. 
 

The big showpiece objects of the sky lose context when you can only observe a small portion of them at a time, so I would stick to smaller targets you can frame well in the eyepiece.

 

The two classes of objects that benefit the most from increasing aperture are galaxies and planetary nebula. I would have lots of those on the menu.


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#23 Starman1

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 08:43 AM

That’s a very long focal length scope, so unless they utilise 3” eyepieces, you are going to be limited to a small TFOV. 
 

The big showpiece objects of the sky lose context when you can only observe a small portion of them at a time, so I would stick to smaller targets you can frame well in the eyepiece.

 

The two classes of objects that benefit the most from increasing aperture are galaxies and planetary nebula. I would have lots of those on the menu.

You remind me of my visits to the 60" at Mt. Wilson.

The maximum true field is 10' (with a 100mm FL 4" eyepiece) and I had a list of planetary nebulae to view.

But most of the people there wanted to see M13 (too large), Jupiter (too low), M31, etc.

That scope does not slew easily, so scanning back and forth is not possible.

It was such a waste when half of the objects people asked to see were too large for the field.

 

Allan's advice is very good.


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#24 quazy4quasars

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 12:11 PM

  Andromeda's Parachute  with the goal of seeing  A, B and C images resolved and distinct.  later when the seeing is steadier. 

 

  I'd also hit PGC 60004 and a few of the harder targets from the Distant Galaxies thread; ....but only a choice few.

 

  Then some small Planetaries, zoomed and resolved, for color.

 

  And a smattering of globulars....

 

  Storms in Jupiter's bands, Saturn's rings.

 

  A deep M42 rip...

 

  The 30" Veil Nebula tour. 



#25 ButterFly

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 01:12 PM

 

  A deep M42 rip...

 

The number of stars that pop through the Huygens region with the 30" Lockwood is just astounding.  Aug is a little early for its full splendor.
 


Edited by ButterFly, 14 July 2020 - 01:12 PM.



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