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Zeissitis

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#76 denis0007dl

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 05:58 PM

Very ineresting thread for me as Zeiss optic and mechanic lover.

 

I think I could attach several hundreds images here, of beauties of Zeiss optics, coatings, mechanics I took over years, which passed through my hands..... grin.gif

Every time when I touch anything from Zeiss, I did it with big respect, and big excitement!

 

My USB stick posess big ownership of these jewels!

 

I will continue to enjoy looking others post of Zeiss pictures flirt.gif


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#77 vahe

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 06:28 PM

grin.gif

 

 When the Zeiss binoviewer was resurrected by Baader with Zeiss made optics I bought one from the first production run from Astro-Physics through Company 7. During the daytime when I was doing some solar observing the Zeiss Abbe orthos would get stuck in the eyepiece holders of the binoviewer, had to dramatically change the temperature to get them out. Turns out it was a case of German precision, the eyepiece barrels were exactly 1.25" and the binoviewer holders were exactly 1.25" and differential expansion of the two dissimilar metals resulted in stuck eyepieces. I sent the binoviewer back to Astro-Physics and Roland bored out the eyepiece holders a couple of thousandths of an inch and they worked beautifully after that. The subsequent runs of this binoviewer had larger diameter eyepiece holders to solve the problem.

 

I have both binoviewers mentioned in your post, the original Zeiss (1994) and the first Baader that replaced it after Zeiss closed their amateur astro production.
The original Zeiss, as you stated, comes with exactly 1.25” eyepiece holders and it can sometimes be awfully difficult to insert an eyepiece in the viewer and equally difficult to remove the eyepiece, on the flip side this is one of its big advantages as the tight openings totally eliminate any play in eyepiece placement, image merging is a non issue with this viewer no matter how short an eyepiece, any eyepiece installed in this viewer remains in perfect alignment.
The old Zeiss has remained my all time favorite.
.
My other binoviewer, a Baader (1997), did not offer diopter adjustment, I removed the fixed eyepiece holders and installed Rich Lapides eyepiece holders.

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#78 Paul G

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 10:30 AM

Hi Paul,

 

That is an impressive Zeiss lineup shocked.gif  !! May I ask which scope(s) is(are) honored with that binoviewer setup?

 

Carlos

In the photo it is on an Astro-Physics Stowaway (the original), I use it on scopes all the way up to the AP 10" Mak-Cass, but the vast majority of its time is spent with my AP 155 EDFS.

 

With the 10" Mak-Cass, the Zeiss eyepieces, and the newer Baader MkV binoviewer I was able to see Deimos and Phobos in the same fov as Mars without an occulting bar, a tribute to the lack of scatter in the system.


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#79 Jim Curry

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 06:41 PM

Here’s the 31mm 70* wide field surrounded by the 40 H and 40 O. 
 

 

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#80 Astrojensen

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 07:24 PM

I wonder how the W-31S compares to a 31mm Nagler or a 30mm ES82?

 

Anyone ever done a direct comparison?

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#81 BRCoz

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 07:43 PM

Sold the set of ZAO I just last week.  Still have a few Jena Zeiss eyepieces.  I was only able to look in to one Zeiss telescope.

The 12-Inch Zeiss Refracting telescope at Griffith Observatory.  All I can say is wow.  

 

Zeiss on.


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#82 Jim Curry

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 10:35 PM

I wonder how the W-31S compares to a 31mm Nagler or a 30mm ES82?

 

Anyone ever done a direct comparison?

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

In an urban setting I did compare the W31 to the N31.  Viewing starfields, the same faintest stars are visible in each.  Nebulosity around Pleiades was for all practical purposes the same.  Field curvature was similar, FOV a little narrower in the Zeiss.  I rarely use this in town due to light pollution.



#83 SpaceX

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 11:18 PM

When I am thinking about Zeiss, I think the world's best refractors. It is my understanding that the company APQ JENA (www.apq.de) largely took over this responsibility. I highly recommend to check out their products. They intend to offer a Polychromat 100/640 Refractor for only 8200 EUR (what a steal!!!).

 

The micro-cosmos is no less fascinating than the macro-cosmos. In fact, in the micro-cosmos we are not necessarily limited to long wavelength photons (~700nm). Electrons can be accelerated to thousands of volts yielding a tiny de broglie wavelength. At 10 000V you achieve a wavelength of roughly 0.01 nm!

 

In the professional field, Zeiss is nearly synonyms with electron microscopes. I am a huge fanboy of their excellent electron microscope instruments. Attached is a cross sectional image I took of a coating on a Zeiss Merlin FESEM at 10 000V electron acceleration yielding nearly 200 000 times image magnification.

 

Cheers!

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Edited by SpaceX, 28 July 2020 - 11:20 PM.

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#84 Nippon

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 12:15 PM

How about an A? 

 

gallery_55742_4772_556185.jpg

 

Zeiss A 85/1572mm from 1904 on Zeiss 1b mount and 3VS tripod. Not often used on this mount, due to (obvious) stability and ergonomic issues. It fits better on a Vixen Saturn mount:

 

gallery_55742_4772_52798.jpg

 

My latest aquisition: A T mount with the über rare 2VS tripod. 

 

gallery_55742_4772_301848.jpg

 

The scope is my old Zeiss Telemator OTA, here seen on the original mount. On the morning this photo was taken, I had used it to independently discover an ancient Lunar Basin. https://www.cloudyni...-the-near-side/

 

gallery_55742_4772_288428.jpg

 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark

How close is the Zeiss dovetail system to the Vixen? Are they by chance compatible?



#85 donadani

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 12:25 PM

no, the Zeiss dovetail is smaller - but you can use an Allen wrench to make it fit (if you are courageous) cool.gif



#86 Nippon

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 12:34 PM

no, the Zeiss dovetail is smaller - but you can use an Allen wrench to make it fit (if you are courageous) cool.gif

Not courageous in fact I'm probably a bit over squirrelly about dovetails and saddles being secure. All the Zeiss refractors I have seen including the APQ have a dovetail bolted directly to the tube. What if you have a scope with tube rings do they sell Zeiss dovetails that can be used with tube rings?



#87 Corcaroli78

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 12:44 PM

Not courageous in fact I'm probably a bit over squirrelly about dovetails and saddles being secure. All the Zeiss refractors I have seen including the APQ have a dovetail bolted directly to the tube. What if you have a scope with tube rings do they sell Zeiss dovetails that can be used with tube rings?

You can use this dovetail that can be attached to standard tube rings. i got it to mount my Skywatcher refractor in the Zeiss T-mount and works fine.

 

https://www.teleskop...long-holes.html

 

Carlos


Edited by Corcaroli78, 29 July 2020 - 12:45 PM.


#88 Astrojensen

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 12:46 PM

 What if you have a scope with tube rings do they sell Zeiss dovetails that can be used with tube rings?

Yes, Baader Planetarium have them, in several different lengths. 

 

The Zeiss dovetails can, with some fiddling, be used in the Vixen dovetail clamps (if the particular clamp can get narrow enough), but not the other way around. On the Vixen GP, you simply put a longer clamping bolt on.

 

gallery_55742_4249_120984.jpg

 

It's not a perfect fit, but the scope is held secure. 

 

gallery_55742_4249_77736.jpg

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark


Edited by Astrojensen, 29 July 2020 - 12:47 PM.

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#89 Nippon

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 12:54 PM

Okay I see. The Zeiss is narrower and has a different bevel angle.



#90 Astrojensen

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 01:02 PM

Okay I see. The Zeiss is narrower and has a different bevel angle.

Yes. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#91 Astrojensen

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 01:10 PM

BTW, I set up my C63/840 on my 1b mount on the 2VS tripod last night, when I wanted to use 2" eyepieces, as the T mount struggles a little with the heavy load of a 2" Baader/Zeiss prism diagonal, Zeiss 7.5x42 finderscope and big, chunky handgrenade eyepieces, like the 17mm ES92 and 30mm ES82. The 1b just laughs. And while the setup is now much heavier, the views are totally worth it. VERY much so. I wish every person, who ever said, that these small scopes were narrow field, just suited for the Moon and planets, could take a look at the Double Cluster through the 30mm ES82 or the 17mm ES92 on mine. 

 

gallery_55742_4772_12363.jpg

 

Closeup of the eyepiece end:

 

gallery_55742_4772_582781.jpg

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


Edited by Astrojensen, 29 July 2020 - 01:14 PM.

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#92 Nippon

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 01:24 PM

That is a real beauty. The big 2" eyepiece reminds me of a teasing comment I once heard when a more experienced observer instructed a novice to point the big end at the sky:)


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#93 Nippon

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 01:31 PM

This is a more seductive eye candy thread than the other one centered around a certain Japanese telescope company and probably as big a threat to the wallet.


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#94 Jim Curry

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 07:10 PM

This is a more seductive eye candy thread than the other one centered around a certain Japanese telescope company and probably as big a threat to the wallet.

Not only good to look at but the optics are so good.  "All" I have are the Zeiss AS achromats but Zeiss optics are sooo good.  I  had my 80x1200 out the other night and it cruised up to 200x effortlessly, 6mm  eyepiece.  The view of the moon was slightly softer and definitely dimming but still worthwhile.  


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#95 Nippon

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 07:28 PM

I came close to buying a Telementor, I think that's what it was I saw in the classifieds a few years ago. But I know me that would start a desperate search for a Zeiss mount and then a Zeiss this and a Zeiss that.


Edited by Nippon, 29 July 2020 - 07:28 PM.

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#96 Nippon

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 07:32 PM

And if this is typical for the Telementor

http://aberrator.ast...ractor63_1.html

Wow


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#97 Corcaroli78

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 01:30 AM

And if this is typical for the Telementor

http://aberrator.ast...ractor63_1.html

Wow

Hi Nippon and experts,

 

A little bit off topic:

 

I am using my Telementor (and other optics) but i am not so much into testing more that visual comparison. From what i read in your attached report, it indicates a C63/840 lens with a wavefront between 1/10 and 1/15. Is that not usual among modern quality mid-top tier optics?   Visually, i feel that the Telementor performs a like bigger aperture scope, but (please forgive my ignorance): what makes the test so remarkable?

 

Thanks,

Carlos


Edited by Corcaroli78, 30 July 2020 - 01:38 AM.

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#98 Astrojensen

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 02:12 AM

 

a C63/840 lens with a wavefront between 1/10 and 1/15. Is that not usual among modern quality mid-top tier optics?

Far from it. Most mid-tier optics today are 1/4 to 1/6 wave. And let me be first to say that if it's an honest 1/6th wave, with smooth polish and no zones, it will be an excellent objective. 

 

True 1/10th wave optics have always been rare. What Zeiss was extremely good at was making sure the lens had no zones and no turned down edge and a very good polish. I've tested a 80/1440mm A lens that was, from what I could judge, around 1/5th wave undercorrected. It gave fabulous lunar/planetary views. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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#99 Jim Curry

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 05:50 AM

And if this is typical for the Telementor

http://aberrator.ast...ractor63_1.html

Wow

I haven't seen this website before.  Interesting read.  I wonder why he didn't identify the lens manufacturers?



#100 Nippon

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 06:12 AM

It's a nice site. For this particular lens test the author does identify it as a Zeiss Telementor. Most of the tests he does not probably to avoid being free brand advertisement or criticism. In one test the scope is described as a 101 mm f/5.4 Petzval not to hard to figure out who the manufacturer is:)


Edited by Nippon, 30 July 2020 - 06:14 AM.



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