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Reference for the science of astrophotography?

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#1 TopherTheME

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 05:45 PM

Does anyone out there have a good reference about the science behind astrophotography? I'm looking to more seriously get into the hobby (as my bank account now allows it smile.gif ) and looking to get a CCD, possibly CMOS, camera. However, before I do I need to brush up on the fundamentals and remember what I'm actually supposed to do. I'm looking for a book or some kind of reference that goes through the methods and maths calculating things like optimal exposure time for SNR or dynamic range, gain and exposure settings for different narrowband filters, etc. Is there a reference that has all this in one place because searching all over the internet for bits and pieces is exhausting...


Edited by TopherTheME, 14 July 2020 - 05:46 PM.


#2 billdan

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 05:57 PM

The Starizona website has a lot of good tutorials on it.

 

https://starizona.co...imaging-basics/



#3 DaveHume

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 09:57 PM

I found these two quite helpful in my understanding of AP

 

https://www.amazon.c...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

https://www.amazon.c...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1


  • Stelios and SimonIRE like this

#4 Alex McConahay

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 10:03 PM

There is lots to learn.....IF you want to go to the source, start here:

 

https://www.amazon.c...g/dp/0943396824

 

Berry and Burnell did it a long time ago, and certainly some of the equipment has changed. But the way you worded your question it sounds like you want the in-depth scholarly treatment. And the concepts that underlie it all has not changed much----and they are in this book. 

 

Alex



#5 Stelios

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 01:28 AM

I found these two quite helpful in my understanding of AP

 

https://www.amazon.c...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

https://www.amazon.c...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1

+1. Before you get to the "science" you need to get a thorough introduction to the basics. You need algebra before calculus, and matrix theory before tensors. 



#6 OldManSky

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 02:06 AM

+1. Before you get to the "science" you need to get a thorough introduction to the basics. You need algebra before calculus, and matrix theory before tensors. 

+2, especially for Woodhouse's excellent book.



#7 N5SE

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 02:16 AM

Also "Make every photon count" I haven't read it, but Sara Wager a pro astrophotographer recommends it



#8 SimonIRE

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 02:18 AM

I found these two quite helpful in my understanding of AP

 

https://www.amazon.c...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

https://www.amazon.c...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

These two, in my opinion, are the reference standards when beginning. The first one should follow the second as its more in depth and arguably not a beginners book...but it goes into enough depth to satisfy those who like to go in at the deep end. 

 

I got these two recommendations here on CN a year ago (I am a novice to AP but not to visual) and they are just great. 



#9 TopherTheME

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 06:24 PM

There is lots to learn.....IF you want to go to the source, start here:

 

https://www.amazon.c...g/dp/0943396824

 

Berry and Burnell did it a long time ago, and certainly some of the equipment has changed. But the way you worded your question it sounds like you want the in-depth scholarly treatment. And the concepts that underlie it all has not changed much----and they are in this book. 

 

Alex

 

Yes! I'm looking for the in-depth scholarly treatment. I know the basics but not a lot of the details. I worked a lot with optics and avalanche photodiodes in grad school so a lot of the fundamental knowledge is in my head somewhere, I just need help accessing it again. 

 

 

These two, in my opinion, are the reference standards when beginning. The first one should follow the second as its more in depth and arguably not a beginners book...but it goes into enough depth to satisfy those who like to go in at the deep end. 

 

I got these two recommendations here on CN a year ago (I am a novice to AP but not to visual) and they are just great. 

 

Well I guess that settles it then, I'll start with those two. Now to decide do I want digital or print...

 

Thanks for the replies bow.gif




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