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Resource(s) on which filter does what on nebulae?

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#1 meegja

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 10:34 AM

I am looking for some resource(s) on which filter does what on (known) nebulae when capturing. I do know the principle of broad- and narrowband filters but not where to use them. For example, I do know that the red starburst of M82 can be captured best in H-Alpha. But I don't know which other objects are best captured in H-Alpha.

There is for example this page https://www.prairiea...common-nebulae/ but that's based on visual observations as I understood it. Seems to me that that matters, visual use is different then photography.

 

Thanks in advance,

Menno



#2 Aaron_tragle

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 10:40 AM

Most emission nebulae have Hα, reflection nebulae are always broadspectrum. 


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#3 meegja

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 10:48 AM

Most emission nebulae have Hα, reflection nebulae are always broadspectrum. 

Thanks :)

But which nebula is what? I don't know which nebula is reflection or emission. So looking for a summary site with that info.



#4 dan_hm

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 11:02 AM

Well, essentially any emission or planetary nebula will have significant H-alpha. Nothing else other than a few galaxies will have any that is detectable. The more important question would be what the OIII and SII content of the nebula is. For that I personally would just browse Astrobin and see what kind of data people put into a given object. 


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#5 Aaron_tragle

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 11:16 AM

Thanks smile.gif

But which nebula is what? I don't know which nebula is reflection or emission. So looking for a summary site with that info.

For most common objects and some of the more obscure objects, the object's Wikipedia page is pretty reliable for that info.


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#6 meegja

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 11:23 AM

For most common objects and some of the more obscure objects, the object's Wikipedia page is pretty reliable for that info.

The most logical answers are often overlooked foreheadslap.gif

Thanks!



#7 sg6

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 11:34 AM

The Prairie Astro one is OK for imaging. Seems that if it has OIII in visual the it by default has it in imaging also. The purpose of the investigation was which responded well to a filter.

 

If I recall the Ha end was omitted, so looking at Ha nebula sources is absent. Reason was - if I recall - that the eye response for Ha meant that you could or would get a poor or innacurate result. So it was not specifically covered. Ha falls at a bad position for the visual response.

 

Vague memory that someone took the information and converted it to a spreadsheet. Half thought I had a copy but it seems not. Or not that I can find.

 

It would seem that a table of nebula and the levels of OIII, Hb, Ha, SII and possibly a few more would be useful. Any chance of a CN Project ?


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#8 james7ca

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 11:40 AM

Here is a good link (existing discussion on CN):

 

  https://www.cloudyni...s/#entry9524149

 

Also this thread:

 

 https://www.cloudyni...t/#entry9681253

 

Plus, you can review many different thread on this topic by executing the following Google search:

narrow band targets site:cloudynights.com

Edited by james7ca, 16 July 2020 - 11:52 AM.

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#9 catalogman

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 12:11 PM

Thanks smile.gif

But which nebula is what? I don't know which nebula is reflection or emission. So looking for a summary site with that info.

 

When you look up a nebula in SIMBAD, the catalogue aliases will identify the type of nebula:

examples of reflection nebulae are DG, vdB, and vdBH; examples of emission nebulae are

DWB, Gum, RCW, and Sh 2.

 

-- catalogman


Edited by catalogman, 16 July 2020 - 12:30 PM.

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#10 meegja

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 12:24 PM

Okay, thanks all!! Think I have enough info for the next 300 years waytogo.gif




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