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2060 : STREHL 99.999

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#1 delorehal

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 02:45 PM

In another post, I talked about my first telescope a Perl Vixen 60mm f15 that I bough new more than 40 years ago (yes forty yearsbawling.gif), it was on display and I could buy it because a friend of my mother knew the optician who was selling it (he only had one telescope for sale).

The price was something like (the equivalent of) 600 euros, a big sum for a kid.

The optician who sold me this refractor then put a Vixen 80mm on display, I remember looked at it everytime my parents went in the city.

Internet didn't exist (or at least not in this actual form and not for the public), so I had some information on magazines, my dream telescope was a Perl Royal 115mm with a Pier, on the catalogue you could understand it was the best as the number of Titan satellites it could show...

I "saw" the first apo (Vixen Fluorite, Zeiss APQ) on photos, sellers promised 600x with the 4" on the Moon.

 

Today you can buy a 4" refractor as an entry level (for something like 100 bucks), a 80mm apo for $400, a 150mm (semi)apo for $2000/2500 and with internet you can buy used equipment like my 6" achro for less than $300.

 

All this in in a little more than 40 years...

 

So I wonder what the 2060 refractors will look like

There is a physical limit with one human can lift, have in his house, car, etc, this limit is close to 7" or 10" (f ratio, physical condition)

So the 2060 refractors won't be much bigger than the actual ones.

For me the achro will be replaced by semi apo (inexpensive ED FPL5xxxx) even for beginners, machine will polish lenses to a very good precision at a lower price.

Synta may make their telescopes in other countries at lower cost.

What else, what is your view of the 2060 refractor ?


Edited by delorehal, 21 July 2020 - 12:19 AM.

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#2 delorehal

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 02:57 PM

I will add that eyepeices will be electronic (image intensifier) and we will be able to see colors in deep sky with little refractors

The big one won't be triplet but singlet with corrector (like the zerochromat), very fast cool down, little weight, and low cost).


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#3 TOMDEY

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 03:41 PM

By then, the Warp Drive will have been perfected, and we will actually have gone to, and returned, to/from all the Messier Objects and around half of the Caldwells, Herschel 400's etc, etc. And, just like our first probes to Mars... we will discover that earth-based observers, looking thru telescopes... had been full of malarkey.    Tom

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#4 P_Myers

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 03:43 PM



ECO tours into low/high altitude space.... where the paying customers will be able to image from above the atmosphere in the vacuum of space.
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#5 Cotts

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 03:44 PM

Maybe by 2060 people will realize that  central obstructions can be ignored in terms of contrast transfer in a Newt or Cass as long as it is kept below 20% by diameter -  and the refractor will retire to museums. 

 

Dave


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#6 Astrojensen

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 03:50 PM

Maybe by 2060 people will realize that  central obstructions can be ignored in terms of contrast transfer in a Newt or Cass as long as it is kept below 20% by diameter -  and the refractor will retire to museums. 

 

Dave

Eeeexcept for the fact that refractors are still superior to reflectors for solar observing (unless the reflector is purpose-built), especially H-alpha.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#7 Heywood

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 05:00 PM

In 2060?  I will still be waiting for my Astro-Physics 6" apo.  grin.gif


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#8 doctordub

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Posted 23 July 2020 - 09:53 AM

By then, the Warp Drive will have been perfected, and we will actually have gone to, and returned, to/from all the Messier Objects and around half of the Caldwells, Herschel 400's etc, etc. And, just like our first probes to Mars... we will discover that earth-based observers, looking thru telescopes... had been full of malarkey.    Tom

Warp Drive will not be launched till April 5, of 2063.lol.gif

CS

Jonathan


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#9 MalVeauX

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Posted 23 July 2020 - 10:08 AM

Hrm,

 

I think the light pollution, satellites and space stations of 2060 will make terrestrial telescopes nothing more than memories of the past. Only orbiting telescopes will be a thing by then.

 

It's that or we will have a cloud of post nuclear fallout blocking light and it won't matter.

 

Very best,


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#10 descott12

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Posted 23 July 2020 - 10:27 AM

Hrm,

 

I think the light pollution, satellites and space stations of 2060 will make terrestrial telescopes nothing more than memories of the past. Only orbiting telescopes will be a thing by then.

 

It's that or we will have a cloud of post nuclear fallout blocking light and it won't matter.

 

Very best,

But I bet you will still be posting some amazing solar imagery!


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#11 RajG

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Posted 25 July 2020 - 07:44 AM

Actually, the perfectly achromatic solution with Strehl of 1 has been known since the 1600s. It's called a parabolic mirror.


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#12 Scott in NC

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Posted 25 July 2020 - 09:42 AM

Warp Drive will not be launched till April 5, of 2063.lol.gif

CS

Jonathan

And we’ve just got 10 more years to wait until Zefram Cochrane’s birth! cool.gif


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#13 gnowellsct

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Posted 25 July 2020 - 06:15 PM

In 2060? I will still be waiting for my Astro-Physics 6" apo. grin.gif


This
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#14 gnowellsct

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Posted 25 July 2020 - 06:18 PM

Maybe by 2060 people will realize that central obstructions can be ignored in terms of contrast transfer in a Newt or Cass as long as it is kept below 20% by diameter - and the refractor will retire to museums.

Dave


Or maybe they will realize that instruments optimized for planet viewing are big time inadequate for wide field views
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#15 Alan French

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 02:36 PM

Or maybe they will realize that instruments optimized for planet viewing are big time inadequate for wide field views

And that there are many deep sky targets that don't require a wide field of view and are stunning through a "planetary" telescope.

 

Clear skies, Alan



#16 StarHugger

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 03:03 PM

In the future as currently the oceans will continue slamming earths land masses slowing the planets spin increasing daylight (more evaporation more clouds) and minimizing astronomical darkness...good thing is this will be hardly noticeable by 2060 but 40 years of satellite launches will clutter the skies with junk, the light polluters will invent all kinds of new lights plus silly excuses for their use and soda lime glass will likely cost as much as lanthanum glass does today. Its not looking so great and I'm not even any good at predictions plus I kept it short. So get your digs in folks, theres no better time than the present!

#17 Heywood

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 03:07 PM

The biggest threat may be geo-engineering of the atmosphere to slow global warming. Think lots of light-reflecting chemicals. When the heat gets bad, governments will get desperate.
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#18 Supernova74

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 04:51 PM

man on mars!?



#19 MooEy

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 02:42 AM

20 years ago i wanted an AP Traveller, today I still want an AP Traveller.

 

Probably I would end up bidding 40-50k in 2060 for an AP Traveller...



#20 Cotts

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 06:13 PM

Or maybe they will realize that instruments optimized for planet viewing are big time inadequate for wide field views

 

And that there are many deep sky targets that don't require a wide field of view and are stunning through a "planetary" telescope.

 

Clear skies, Alan

It is almost as if owning TWO telescopes, each purposed differently/opposite from its counterpart, is the thing to do........

 

Dave


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#21 Daniel Mounsey

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 07:43 AM

IMO it isn’t the scopes that are lacking so much. It’s the people that don’t learn to exploit the scopes they already have. 


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