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Galileoscope - best quick mods?

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#1 therealdmt

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Posted 21 July 2020 - 02:42 AM

Hey, all.
 

I just bought me one of those Galileoscopes from Explore Scientific (after hearing an old astronomy podcast rave about it and that rekindling my memory of reading about the Galileoscope back when it first came out in, iirc, 2009). I won’t be able to unbox the scope until next weekend, but no biggie as I only just ordered a tripod for it.

The tripod is a Victiv t72 72-inch camera tripod - prolly sucks for this, but everyone gave it good reviews (as a camera tripod) on Amazon, even sharing photos and little videos of it, etc.; I mean, they loved the thing! lol.gif   Anyway, that’ll at least give me something to put the Galileoscope on to start with.

This’ll actually be me first scope of any sort in, well, half a century (yikes). I’m not expecting too much, but if there are some quick and easy mods I could do upon assembly that’ll yield a better initial viewing experience, I’d like to know. I read a mention of running a black Sharpie around the edge of the objective lens - anyone have any thoughts on that? Also, flocking was mentioned, which I guess has to do with reducing internal reflections in the plastic tubed body of the scope, correct? Sounds a little involved, but perhaps there is a widely available Rustoleum/Krylon-type spray (spray-on truck bed liner?) that would be similarly effective?

 

Any other ideas?

Thanks for any help.
- David


Edited by therealdmt, 21 July 2020 - 02:44 AM.


#2 N-1

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Posted 22 July 2020 - 09:33 PM

Plenty of suggestions on line, but I've put some of my own thoughts here

In summary, for visual: flock it -especially the draw tube, and mount it on a reasonably good tripod with a ball-head, which is used with the stalk in the notch so that the ball itself is only used for the altitude movements. The tube itself is suitable as a lever for moving it around in this setup. Avoid fixed mounting (like you would a regular scope) using the 1/4" camera thread nut, for example by attaching a Vixen style dovetail bar there. This combo will break at the weakest point (where the nut is held in its plastic socket) eventually, when you bump the black tube in the dark or try to move the scope by the tube. Use tube rings for this.

For "imaging", or even just to use it with a diagonal, chop the tube about where the last baffle is (closest to the eyepiece end), and find a way to attach some sort of focusing mechanism, like a helical.

Paint the gun sights white.

The most effective of all these mods is easily the flocking. The result absolutely dwarfs what any amount of lens edge blackening would achieve. I used stick-on fake velvet from Aliexpress, which cost just a few $.

It deserves proper eyepieces too. The ones it came with are ok for demonstrating how an EP works but no more. Mine is used often with the 28mm RKE, the 24mm ES 68° and the 10mm Svbony with great results. 5-6mm is about as short as the 50mm objective will support.


Edited by N-1, 22 July 2020 - 10:00 PM.

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#3 therealdmt

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Posted 23 July 2020 - 09:58 PM

Thanks, Sputnik.

 

That’s a bit to digest as I’m actually a beginner (I’ve looked through a telescope about 15 times in my life, and those times were all many years ago), but one of the mods decided I wasn’t a beginner and moved the post here.

 

Anyway, I’ll read through it - looks like lots of great info, the main thing being that flocking is the biggie (I’m still not sure exactly what flocking is besides painting with I guess some kind of particles in the paint, but anyway, I know it’s important!) and don’t use a dovetail mount. That’s great stuff as I was just thinking, "Maybe I’d better buy one of these dovetail things I keep reading about" - no joke, so thank you for that.

 

Also, I see that a better eyepiece is important, and I did read elsewhere about cutting down the tube to make it focus. I don’t quite understand why, but I imagine it will become more apparent when I put the scope together and start trying to use it either this coming weekend or next.

 

I’ll read through the link you posted this weekend.

 

Thanks again,

-David



#4 Jaimo!

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Posted 23 July 2020 - 11:32 PM

There is self adhesive flocking paper available, it is almost like black velvet but not reflective.  Once placed inside the tube, it will keep stray light from bouncing off the semi-reflective plastic interior.   Do a Google for "telescope flocking material" it is readily available from a number of vendors.  

 

An inexpensive diagonal would probably help out a lot also.


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#5 therealdmt

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 05:04 AM

There is self adhesive flocking paper available, it is almost like black velvet but not reflective.  Once placed inside the tube, it will keep stray light from bouncing off the semi-reflective plastic interior.   Do a Google for "telescope flocking material" it is readily available from a number of vendors.  

 

An inexpensive diagonal would probably help out a lot also.

OKay, after following a few links (mainly this one: http://www.deepskywa...-newtonian.html ), I see now what you mean about self-adhesive flocking paper and also what Sputnik meant about just using some stick-on fake velvet. I get it now. I was worried I was gonna have to get into painting and blowing some small particles around, wearing breathing and eye protection, etc. Stick-on paper sounds worlds better!

 

Meanwhile, although I didn’t even know what a star diagonal was until a couple of days ago (until I looked it up after reading in past threads here that the Galileoscope sorely needed one), I can see that with a refractor, unless one has a stable tripod the size of a medium-sized Christmas tree, observing above the horizon is going to quickly become a literal pain in the neck if you’re not able to direct light from the target off to the side for easier viewing. Apparently the Galileoscope has an issue with attaching a diagonal though, in that it cannot focus with one attached. I’ve read that one part of dealing with this is to, like Sputnik said, cut off the end of the tube. Can’t see why that would help yet, but it’ll probably become more apparent once I get the scope in hand, assembled and start trying to focus on things with it.

 

Thank you for your help


Edited by therealdmt, 24 July 2020 - 05:26 AM.

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#6 therealdmt

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 05:23 AM

Anyone have any thoughts on the black Sharpie trick? I’ll have to order the flocking material, but I could start with the Sharpie this weekend.

 

I can guess to darken the outside rim of [all?] lenses with a black Sharpie, but should I also darken on the face of the lens itself? I mean, obviously not in the middle of the face of the lens, but around the edges (a lens mask, I think such would be called)? If so, how wide should such a lens mask be, and should this be done to all lenses, or just to the front objective?


Edited by therealdmt, 24 July 2020 - 05:27 AM.


#7 Jaimo!

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 06:44 AM

Just darken the edges, it would be detrimental to your views to darken the face. 


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#8 therealdmt

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 07:00 AM

Just darken the edges, it would be detrimental to your views to darken the face. 

Okay, thanks. When I read "black Sharpie around the edges" elsewhere, I actually pictured it as being like a mask. It was only when formulating my question above that the thought occurred to me the edge of the lens might mean like around the rim, not the outer part of the face of the lens! 
 

i think I confused the issue with something I read in relation to, maybe, astrophotography, where people put a circular cutout or somesuch on the objective to reduce effective diameter (not sure why they’d do that, but that would seem to be for other purposes entirely then what I need as I don’t plan on doing any astroohotography at this point)



#9 Jaimo!

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 12:56 PM

I have been thinking a lot about this thread this morning...  I have an unassembled Galileo scope stored away, and got it out thinking of the upgrades.  While I am a huge fan of the idea behind the production of this scope and the educational experiences it represents.  I don't know if going to the trouble of flocking and upgrading will make a noticable difference, and would these funds be better spent saving for a larger aperture and/or more substantial mount...?  If it were me, I'd take it out and observe Jupiter, Saturn and the moon for the next month, they will be an excellent position, and then decide what upgrades you see are needed before you start. 

 

Just thinking out loud,

Jaimo!


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#10 Sketcher

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 03:00 PM

I've given my own Galileoscopes reasonable "workouts" over the past few years.

 

The primary area for improvement (in my opinion) lies in using better eyepieces -- inexpensive Plossls with glass lenses and coated optics can be had quite cheaply and represent a substantial improvement over the stock Plossl with its uncoated plastic lenses.

 

That single "modification" was enough to keep me going with a Galileoscope for quite a while.

 

Eventually I decided that it would be nice to be able use a Galileoscope with a diagonal, so I made that modification to one of mine.  This wasn't as important (to me) as the eyepiece upgrade; but it's something that some will find worthwhile.

 

Galileoscope Rt angle Sketcher 2019

 

The only other modification I've made was purely cosmetic.  I painted the logo that comes stamped into the plastic.

 

Galileoscope logo Sketcher 2019

 

I've seen no need to make any other modifications, so I stopped with the above.

 

Edit:  Oops! I forgot about a couple of other things.  I made dustcaps for the front end and improvised soft-cases for dust-free storage.  I also improvised a way of mounting a Galileoscope (the one with the diagonal) piggy-back onto a 6-inch refractor - though I rarely use it that way.

 

Personally, I've seen no need for blackening the objective edges nor for flocking -- perhaps because my observing areas are completely free from intrusive lights.  Regardless, I only make modifications if and when I detect a need (or desire - in the case of the logo smile.gif )


Edited by Sketcher, 24 July 2020 - 03:39 PM.

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#11 Jaimo!

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 04:17 PM

Did you need to shorten the OTA with the diagonal?

 

I am tempted to put mine together...



#12 Sketcher

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 06:07 PM

Did you need to shorten the OTA with the diagonal?

Yes.  Adding a diagonal effectively moves the eyepiece further from the objective.  So, in order to still be able to focus, the OTA needs to be cut shorter.  Doing that returns the objective to eyepiece distance back to a workable range.

 

How much to cut off?  Measure the objective-eyepiece distance when focused on a distant object -- using just the objective and eyepiece -- perhaps with those two components placed on a meter (or yard) stick.  Then put the eyepiece in the diagonal and measure the diagonal-objective distance needed for a proper focus.

 

Once you understand the reasoning behind the situation, you'll be able to work out a reasonable solution.

 

But first, I would suggest using the Galileoscope for a while without a diagonal.  You might discover that it'll work sufficiently well for you without butchering the OTA -- straight through.

 

With a tripod that can raise the OTA high enough, it'll be possible to observe objects that are quite high in one's sky, in relative comfort, without using a diagonal.  Galileo managed without a diagonal smile.gif

 

Since you felt the need to ask the question:  I wouldn't suggest cutting the OTA for use with a diagonal until you know and understand how you'll deal with all the practical details involved; things like keeping the OTA together at the eyepiece end and keeping the diagonal from falling out.  A bit of creative problem-solving will be necessary.

 

P.S.  One negative with a diagonal is that the diagonal and eyepiece can (depending on details) get in the way of being able to use the nifty finder sights on the OTA.  Think it all through before going into "surgery".


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#13 Spikey131

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 06:46 PM

Wait.

Galileoscope.

I thought the whole point was to see the sky (sort of) like Galileo saw it. Why would you want to improve it? Just but a 6” or 8” Modern dob if you want better views.

#14 Jaimo!

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 11:15 PM

Yes.  Adding a diagonal effectively moves the eyepiece further from the objective.  So, in order to still be able to focus, the OTA needs to be cut shorter.  Doing that returns the objective to eyepiece distance back to a workable range.

 

How much to cut off?  Measure the objective-eyepiece distance when focused on a distant object -- using just the objective and eyepiece -- perhaps with those two components placed on a meter (or yard) stick.  Then put the eyepiece in the diagonal and measure the diagonal-objective distance needed for a proper focus.

 

Once you understand the reasoning behind the situation, you'll be able to work out a reasonable solution.

 

But first, I would suggest using the Galileoscope for a while without a diagonal.  You might discover that it'll work sufficiently well for you without butchering the OTA -- straight through.

 

With a tripod that can raise the OTA high enough, it'll be possible to observe objects that are quite high in one's sky, in relative comfort, without using a diagonal.  Galileo managed without a diagonal smile.gif

 

Since you felt the need to ask the question:  I wouldn't suggest cutting the OTA for use with a diagonal until you know and understand how you'll deal with all the practical details involved; things like keeping the OTA together at the eyepiece end and keeping the diagonal from falling out.  A bit of creative problem-solving will be necessary.

 

P.S.  One negative with a diagonal is that the diagonal and eyepiece can (depending on details) get in the way of being able to use the nifty finder sights on the OTA.  Think it all through before going into "surgery".

Not so tempted to put it together anymore...



#15 therealdmt

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Posted 25 July 2020 - 11:39 AM

First, I called the first poster who responded to this thread "Sputnik", but I see his user name is N-1. Oops, sorry N-1 crazy.gif


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#16 therealdmt

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Posted 25 July 2020 - 11:58 AM

Okay, so I got home and put the Galileoscope together. Well, mostly together - turns out I left out a part, part N - "Tiny, thin eyepiece ring/field stop" from the eyepiece assembly! I’m not sure how important this tiny thin ring is, but maybe it would have helped because the eyepiece, in my very inexperienced opinion, sucks, at least as is (assembled sans part N). I screwed up. It says the instructions are for ages 8+, but maybe they didn’t consider someone over 50. There is evidence for that, actually, as the font of the instruction booklet is so tiny that I literally had to use a magnifying glass to read it lol.gif

 

The scope went together pretty quick - I dunno, maybe an hour and a half or two hours once I got down to it, but I was texting a friend  in the middle of it, talking with my wife, reading instructions with a magnifying glass, etc. I could put a second one together in more like 20 minutes now, especially if I didn’t Sharpie the lens rims. I did Sharpie the rims of the objective lenses (two lenses together, so a doublet, I guess) on this one, fwiw. Maybe I should have done that to the eyepiece lenses too, but they are pretty small and I decided to not get too cute and maybe screw something up while trying to overdo it with the little lenses. Oh yeah, I screwed up on other instruction in that when I got it together, the two halves of the optical tube assembly didn’t quite fit together in the middle; turned out I had to open it back up (slide off some rings and then the two halves just come apart) and rotate the nut [for a tripod’s mounting screw to go in] a fraction of a turn so it would seat in farther in its recess. Then I put it back together and everything fit fine.

 

Once I saw that extra tiny, thin ring on the table though after getting everything together and giving it first [day]light, I tried to open up the main eyepiece assembly that it was intended for so I could put the ring in as intended and...couldn’t. The two halves of the main eyepiece assembly start to come apart easily enough on the lens side, but the other side seems to now be latched together somehow. Tried to pry it open with a screwdriver, but didn’t want to force it too hard and stopped. In the end, my efforts dislodged a tiny piece of plastic a bit into the field of view, so my attempt to fix my mistake only made things slightly worse. Oh well, it’s just a little nib way off to the side, I do wonder if the little ring would somehow help though...


Edited by therealdmt, 26 July 2020 - 07:49 AM.


#17 Brent Campbell

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Posted 25 July 2020 - 12:28 PM

There is self adhesive flocking paper available, it is almost like black velvet but not reflective.  Once placed inside the tube, it will keep stray light from bouncing off the semi-reflective plastic interior.   Do a Google for "telescope flocking material" it is readily available from a number of vendors.  

 

An inexpensive diagonal would probably help out a lot also.

The galeleoscope won’t come to focus with a diagonal unless you cut the tube down.



#18 therealdmt

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Posted 25 July 2020 - 12:31 PM

Well, ater consecutive weekends of mostly rain here, the skies unexpectedly cleared today so my wife and I grabbed the newly assembled Galileoscope, headed up to our local mountain and, thanks to bringing along a pair of binoculars(!), finally got to see comet NEOWISE (yeah!). It was a good night for viewing; the Milky Way could be seen a bit with the naked eye, and with my little roof prism binoculars, my wife and I could both clearly (though barely) make out Jupiter’s moons and also a hint of Saturn’s rings, plus like I said, the star of the evening (so to speak), the comet. NEOWISE was dim, but I’m happy to report that my wife was able to make it out too, and for reference, she didn’t even understand the difference between a comet, an asteroid and a meteor until a few days ago when I started talking about the comet being around but fading and then suddenly ordered the Galileoscope.

 

Thank heavens (haha) I brought the binoculars along, since with the Galileoscope I struggled to even simply get the Moon in view and focused (my wife never even saw it). The fault lies heavily with the "mount" I had to employ, a little waist-high camera tripod we happened to have stowed uselessly in a closet. The tripod I ordered for the Galileoscope (a ‘Victiv T72’ seventy two inch max extension tripod capable of carrying 9 lbs.) isn’t here yet, but when the skies cleared today, I had to give the Galileoscope a try and that crappy little tripod was the only thing on hand. Couldn’t really get it to work, so after much much frustration and neck pain I ended up holding the Galileoscope by hand while propping my arms/elbows up against various objects. I did finally sight the moon and eventually managed to get it in focus. The view was clearly bigger and more detailed than with my little binocs, but it was so hard just to get the image on my pupil. I’m a beginner so maybe I’ll get better at that, but looking at the Moon with the binoculars was, despite the smaller size and less detail, a much better experience because I could just point the binoculars up at the Moon and...you know, see the Moon.

 

The field of view is so small with the Galileoscope, and with no effective tripod, I had a very, very hard time even getting the scope on the Moon, let alone getting it in focus. I should say that viewing the Moon did actually go relatively quickly when I tried it out during the day while resting the scope on top of the door of my car, but at night the gunsight-type sighting nibs were useless. I did paint them white per N-1’s advice above, but in the dark at the site we went to up on the mountain, the white paint didn’t help at all; just couldn’t really see ‘em.

 

Later, after retreating to the car. I managed to kind of wedge my arm against the windowsill and recline my seat back at a good angle and I was finally able to get Jupiter in view. It was a surprisingly (to me) large disk, yellow, with a hint of banding even. And the 4 moons were quite clear. I can’t really remember well what Jupiter looked like in the scope I had as a kid, but having used only small binoculars since then, once I finally got it in sight and focused (no easy task), the Galileoscope gave me the best view of Jupiter I can remember having. Saturn is of course right there pretty much next to Jupiter these days, but try as I might, I could never even get Saturn in the field of view. Disappointing for sure, especially considering it was right there, but maybe the [hopefully] better tripod that’s coming will help with that for next time.

 

Like I said, my wife failed to even get a clear view of the Moon. I don’t know how much she tried on Jupiter (she certainly didn’t see it), but to my surprise, after getting back home and sitting out on a lawn chair with the tripod kinda balanced on her legs, she reported getting Saturn in sight. But, like myself with Jupiter after we got back home, trying to push the focusing tube into focus led to losing the target. So she did briefly get Saturn in sight and I briefly got Jupiter in sight after we got back home, but neither of us were able to get our respective object in focus. A bit frustrating for sure (like I said though, I did manage to get Jupiter in pretty decent focus when up on the mountain — did it once again even, after trying [but failing] to see other targets).

 

Initial conclusions: this Galileoscope is gonna need some help to be useful for me, with the most obvious thing missing being a good suitable tripod (duh). Beyond that, a better sighting mechanism (like mounting a laser on it?) and a better eyepiece immediately come to mind. Then I can worry about stuff like flocking. I sure hope this Activ T72 tripod works out so I can start making some better progress with the whole Galileoscope thing. A bit frustrated tonight, but what can one expect without a decent tripod (answer: frustration, of course). The view of Jupiter I got did give me some hope, though


Edited by therealdmt, 26 July 2020 - 07:53 AM.

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#19 therealdmt

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Posted 26 July 2020 - 07:21 AM

I got two sessions in today with the Galileoscope during the daytime, just working on aiming and focusing using terrestrial targets, and that paid dividends when I was able to get in a quick lunar viewing session after sunset, before things clouded over. 

One of the biggest things in my improvement was just learning to use the tripod. Last night, my first night, I had only had a short time in the afternoon with it before we had to head up to the mountain to be there by dark, and I had only used the tripod like two brief times before, both over a year ago, mainly just enough to figure out it wouldn’t suit my needs as a camera tripod, and then it went in the closet, otherwise forgotten. Hadn’t been totally sure what two of the tripod adjustment screws even did as I was fumbling around in the dark with it up on the mountain yesterday. Panning, altitude adjustment and even how securely the scope was attached to the adapter part that fits into the tripod head - I got better at all of those today.

 

Additionally, I learned to aim a lot better with the gunsight-type scope sight (at least in the light, when it can be seen), got more of a handle on looking through the eyepiece and to some extent got better at focusing (well, at least more practiced). My wife put something out on a fence post across the yard, and 1) I was able to get it in view and focus in on it (yeah!), and 2) I was surprised to see it was an upside down little black matchbox-sized truck with a silver tank that said "GASOLINE" on the side. Dang. Later she put a matchbox car out there and I could tell it was a car facing away from me and that taillights and a license plate were on the back. She asked me to read the license plate number, but that was asking too much. The view was soft and blurry, kinda like looking through a vaselined lens, but quite a bit of detail could actually be made out in the center even though the image quality was poor. Later, I took the scope over to the shore and practiced on targets farther away like on an island out there, boats at various distances, towers, etc. Got pretty good at getting it on target and reasonably well in focus. When the Moon came up later, my new skills served me well, though the high altitude of the Moon was a literal pain in the neck. I had a bit of difficulty just focusing on the lunar South Pole (so, top of image) specifically rather than just being happy to see the whole thing, but I was eventually able to do that, too.

 

I’d love to get another shot at Saturn (which I failed to see the first night) now, but alas, the clouds have moved back in and the weekend is swiftly coming to a conclusion.

 

i should have the new, taller tripod next weekend - hopefully the controls are similar now that I finally learned to control this one!

 

The eyepeice is a real weakness, I’m thinking, so I’m gonna start being on the lookout for some kind of upgrade there. And a useable finder, and some kind of better way of focusing.... Anyway, a hint of success today, at least with terrestrial targets and the Moon


Edited by therealdmt, 26 July 2020 - 06:01 PM.

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#20 therealdmt

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 03:57 AM

Using the Galileoscope with the small camera tripod we had on hand was a bit of a [literal] pain in the neck
 
(top) Action astronomy; (bottom) La luna, in my sights 

lol.gif

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Edited by therealdmt, 27 July 2020 - 03:58 AM.

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#21 therealdmt

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 11:17 AM

Finally got back to the scope again for the first time in a couple of days and...Success with Saturn!

 

My previous daytime practice really paid off and I was able to pretty quickly get it on Saturn after my wife noticed some clouds had cleared and called me to come outside and give it a try. Looking through the stock eyepiece is a little disconcerting at first as I don’t make out any background stars - I just see nothing (as if a lens cap were on) until the target gets in the narrow viewing area, and then suddenly there’s a white blob to try and get in focus.

 

And when after a little fiddling I did get Saturn in focus, there it was, the ringed planet! I couldn’t see the Cassini division, but I could clearly see the inside gap between the rings and the planet itself. It was pretty tiny and a bit dim, but, as my wife said, it looked just like it does in the pictures you see on the internet.

 

Meanwhile, moving on over to Jupiter, besides all four moons (with one moon [Callisto?] way out to one side and the other three tighter in on the opposite side), I could definitely see some banding on the planet’s disc. I can’t quite say "clearly saw" the banding, but, yeah, Jupiter wasn’t just a featureless yellow disk. There was some faintish, kinda blurry brownish banding at a slight angle to the moons. This Galileoscope thing is hard to focus, but there was also an issue of some overhead thin cirrus clouds that were intent on involving themselves with my view, plus it was just your basic humid summer evening with light pollution, so I wonder what Jupiter would have looked like under better conditions.

 

Speaking of lights, one big advantage to viewing from my front yard (where we have a horrible new streetlight blasting us from out at the end of the yard) as opposed to the dark site up on the mountain is that all the light in the yard lets me see the gun sights no problem.

 

Anyway, just thought I’d let people here on this thread know that it took me a double session of daytime practice plus some light pollution from a nearby streetlight so that I could actually see and use the scope’s gun sight-type finder system, but now, on my 3rd night of use, I can pretty quickly find and see Jupiter and Saturn. The thing works!

 

Regarding the original topic of this thread, improvements to the Galileoscope, while they’re not quite "mods", I’ve got a Svbony SV135 7-21mm zoom eyepiece en route, plus that 72" tripod that still hasn’t arrived, and next I’m gonna order an Orion Alt-Az tripod adapter for hopefully much better fine pointing control than I can get with just the tripod’s head. I might try gluing just a simple narrow hollow tube to it, too, to act as a finder scope that’ll work even in the dark. And then there’s the flocking. Lastly, I’ll probably order about two more eyepieces (one wider FOV/lower mag, the other higher mag).

 

In the end, I think the big limiting weakness for me with the Galileoscope is gonna be the "focuser" - physically sliding the eyepiece tube in and out with one’s hand is invariably going to lead to major shaking and perhaps resultingly losing the target from the field of view completely - not ideal when the purpose of focusing is to get a better view of something, not to make the object disappear! Also, having to bend my neck so much all the time to look through it could cut my Galileoscope phase shorter than I’d anticipated (not sure if I’ll do the cutting down of the scope’s length so as to fit a diagonal or whether I’ll just move on early).

 

Regardless, it was cool to finally clearly see Saturn’s rings again  cool.gif


Edited by therealdmt, 31 July 2020 - 10:17 PM.

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#22 Sketcher

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 01:57 PM

Okay, so I got home and put the Galileoscope together. Well, mostly together - turns out I left out a part, part N - "Tiny, thin eyepiece ring/field stop" from the eyepiece assembly! I’m not sure how important this tiny thin ring is, but maybe it would have helped because the eyepiece, in my very inexperienced opinion, sucks, at least as is (assembled sans part N).

 

I do wonder if the little ring would somehow help though...

That ring provides a sharp, clean, field edge.  The view of anything within the opening of that ring would be the same with as without that field stop.  Without the ring, your true field of view may be just a little bit wider and the quality of that wider region may be a little worse than that seen inside the region masked off by the ring.

 

So the function of the left out ring is primarily "cosmetic".  It's non-essential and doesn't adversely effect the rest of your field of view.


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#23 therealdmt

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 06:34 AM

That ring provides a sharp, clean, field edge.  The view of anything within the opening of that ring would be the same with as without that field stop.  Without the ring, your true field of view may be just a little bit wider and the quality of that wider region may be a little worse than that seen inside the region masked off by the ring.

 

So the function of the left out ring is primarily "cosmetic".  It's non-essential and doesn't adversely effect the rest of your field of view.

Okay, that’s good info and also reassuring, thanks.

 

Meanwhile, I followed your advice above and ordered myself a better eyepiece, which has finally now arrived. Only been able to test it out in daytime so far (just today, in fact), but I can already see that there’s a clear improvement in clarity, eye relief and how much an image fills up the eyepiece. I doubt the stock plastic eyepiece is ever going back in.

 

Its a zoom, so it might end up being a little heavy for the friction-held "focuser" at high pointing altitudes, but if so, I’ll either modify the focuser slightly (like maybe a piece of masking tape around the focuser barrel to make it just a little wider/less slick so it’ll stay in place better) or I’ll order up some lighter, non-zoom eyepieces. Or both. Stayed in place for my daytime viewing targets (radio towers, tops of telephone polls, etc.) fine though, so it might be alright as is

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Edited by therealdmt, 08 August 2020 - 09:26 AM.



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