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Edmund collimation

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#1 phtz

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 06:51 AM

Hello 

 

I’m looking for a doc from Edmund Scientific about collimators, and processes.

I already have the bibles, Opticalman 1,2, and Bill Cook, but I'm interested by other solutions.

It is an old paper , may be 30090-72 ???

Or all doc from Edmund, about this subject. (If I remember, they published some pages about this topic)

 

many thanks 

 



#2 TOMDEY

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 07:21 AM

Yeah, I'd be interested too!

 

The ~gold standard~ for generic all-purpose collimators is the huge aperture bench collimator, that can address any and all instruments and devices, in the lab. Something so big (exit pupil) that you can look in with both barrels of big binos simultaneously. We had those at Kodak (image of one here, that I was designing and building multispectral sources for). Problem is lab space. So nearly all of those are in company labs, not on field-cal ships or vehicles.

 

Ralph Dakin (yeah, that B&L Ralph!) set up his own bino-collimation lab in the basement of his house. He rebuilt a big Newtonian Telescope to become a nice horizontal collimator. People would send him their binos for collimation... full 3-axis collimation!

 

If you have a big old Newt OTA sitting around, can turn that into a horizontal collimator!

 

Here's that vertical-axis Dahl Collimator that I mentioned >>>    Tom

 

~click on~ >>>

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  • 20 Lab Dahl Collimator annotated.jpg


#3 Luis Serrano

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 03:58 PM

I found this one some time ago, not sure if it is useful for you: Collimating Systems



#4 phtz

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 05:49 PM

Thanks, all is useful



#5 Gordon Rayner

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Posted 26 October 2020 - 05:37 PM

In RE # 2:
I have three Hughes F8 450mm. aperture Cassegrain ( Paul Valleli made at least some of those, for Hughes, and told me that they are not R_C, though the lighter orbiting telescopes were Ritchey-Chretien) collimators for GOES meteorological satellite calibration inside a thermal chamber . Several IR wavelengths, and visible, are sourced behind the primary mirror. The systems are folded , with a full aperture flat . at 45 degrees, ahead of the primary mirror.

I recall that this is the Pfund (?) configuration. The axis of the primary is vertical. The working beam was horizontal inside the Hughes thermal chamber. The mirrors are Cer-Vit or Zerodur, for suitability in the thermal chamber . The structure is stainless steel.

Each system is in a large shipping container, on sprung , super-duper Aerol casters.

One or more went to Japan for a while , to calibrate Japanese satellites. JAL cargo stickers remain on the outside of at least one of the containers.

What can someone tell me about who now might want them from me. Ball, Kodak (?),...? Some university or industrial laboratory...

I had film pictures, but lost the roll in a mishap whose details I do not recall. More pictures would require a crane to lift most of each shipping container off its castered platform.

Edited by Gordon Rayner, 26 October 2020 - 05:40 PM.


#6 Gordon Rayner

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Posted 26 October 2020 - 06:15 PM

IN Re. #1 :

I photographed parts of a green bound Navy Bu. Ord publication titled "Collimators for Optical Instruments", or something like that, ( I do not want to dig into my files here, nor those in storage, today).
I posted them in this forum , probably 10 years ago. But the moderators removed them. ( " 60 plus years or not, public domain or not, it violates our policies, if you are not the original writer or source"), or words to that effect.
Later, I bought , and yet have, from now vanished LEGITIMATE (not cumshaw) Navy surplus auction, a set, still in its crate, of about 8 Mk. 8 collimators and their supports on a large aluminum frame. This was for adjusting shipboard sights in a workshop situation.
The collimators are about 50mm aperture. They have separate eyepieces and target-illuminator paired sets for each of the reversed telescope collimators. That is: artificial targets at simulated infinity distance.

Those, and the MK. 3, 4, 5 and 13 (maybe more) binocular collimators, are described in the above cited publication.

Are you aware of Hanna in ATM 2 or 3 , from Willmann-Bell in Richmond , Virginia. Those books are the true "Bible" , to use your terminology.

Be sure to get a JTII "hand collimator" rhomboidal comparator, or equivalent. What was the little one which Hans Seeger was using? RSVP if anybody knows.

Edited by Gordon Rayner, 26 October 2020 - 06:17 PM.


#7 KennyJ

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Posted 27 October 2020 - 02:12 PM

I must have missed this thread when it first appeared 3 months ago, so it only captured my attention via the sudden additional appearances of posts #5 and #6 since yesterday.

 

Reading back, I'm almost certain that first article mentioned in post #1 didn't cover binocular collimation, per se, but was focused (no pun intended! ) rather on the Bill Cook - coined phrase "Conditional Alignment" for just one single I.P.D setting.

 

Also, from what I can see of it, the Edmunds Scientific article linked from post #3 is not about binoculars at all, but just about single telescope collimation.

 

Kenny




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