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Binoviewers with 80mm apo?

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#1 Droro

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 03:41 AM

Wondering about binoviewers to improve visual with my 80mm apo f/6. Would you recommend it? Talking about planets and bright dso. And which eyepieces would you recommend (as I would probably invest in only one pair).
Thanks.


Edited by Droro, 01 August 2020 - 03:41 AM.


#2 Mark9473

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 04:27 AM

I've binoviewed with my 80 mm f/7 apo. Really nice on the Moon and the planets, but on DSO I found the brightness loss to be detrimental.



#3 ButterFly

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 04:28 AM

80mms is rather small for planets.  The resolution just isn't there.  Binoviewing costs add up very quickly.  Your money is better spent on an 8-10" dob for planets.

 

For DSO, remember that splitting a single scope will yield images half as bright in each eye.



#4 Astrojensen

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 04:56 AM

I was using a binoviewer on my 63mm Zeiss last night for observing a Ganymede shadow transit on Jupiter, magnification around 84x. I found the image to be considerably better than a single eyepiece, regardless of the magnification I chose on the single eyepiece. 

 

For deep-sky, I prefer a single eyepiece. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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#5 Droro

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 05:40 AM

80mms is rather small for planets.  The resolution just isn't there.  Binoviewing costs add up very quickly.  Your money is better spent on an 8-10" dob for planets.

 

For DSO, remember that splitting a single scope will yield images half as bright in each eye.

I don't know about that, Its not ideal for planets but can use x225 on my 80mm apo despite recommendations of max x160, the brightness and res isn't bad. 


Edited by Droro, 01 August 2020 - 05:41 AM.


#6 Eddgie

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 08:53 AM

Whenever you get a answer that says it is good and an answer that says it is not, then the answer to your question is that you need to try it yourself to see.

 

That is what I recommend you do.  Buy a used BV and try it out.  If it does not work for you, you can sell it and recoup almost all of your money.

 

If you like it you can then make the decision as to whether you would like to upgrade of invest more, but for planetary viewing, even inexpensive binoviewers work quite well..

 

There is a abundance of used gear out there that make experimenting like this financially risk free. 


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