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EP recommendations

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#1 p51dplt

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 10:04 AM

Hello all, 

 

I recently purchased a Celestron 8SE and am looking for recommendations for a couple new eyepieces. The previous owner upgraded it to a 2" diagonal but I also have the 1.25" that came with the scope. So far I am using the included 25mm EP and I purchased a 2x barlow. The views are certainly much better than my 70mm funscope, but still not as good as I would of thought for such a much bigger scope. I am guessing the included 25mm EP is of lower quality and buying a couple higher quality EP's will help tremendously.

 

I don't want to break the bank, but would like to get a couple nicer EP's. What can you recommend for better viewing? 

 

Thanks!

 

 



#2 MalVeauX

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 10:16 AM

Hi,

 

With bigger aperture (especially a mirror) comes new issues:

 

1) Collimation (if its off, your image is soft, mushy)

2) Seeing conditions (bigger aperture resolves poor seeing quite well, so if you're trying to view Jupiter and its mushy, this is another factor)

3) Thermal acclimation (big thick optics have to thermally acclimate or they will shift as temps move and your image will be mushy at higher magnifications)

4) Lastly, light pollution, if looking at DSO, not a function of the scope

 

A basic 25mm plossl will be fantastic on a C8 if the above first 3 points are satisfied. And a dark sky is the only solution for the 4th point.

 

Don't buy more stuff until the above is handled and experienced. At least unless you have legit plastic eyepieces. But basic plossls are cheap, sharp and would be fine. But nothing will be great if the above points are not handled up front. 

 

Very best,


Edited by MalVeauX, 01 August 2020 - 10:36 AM.


#3 PNW

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 10:34 AM

I have the older Nexstar 8. There's no dovetail, the OTA is screwed onto the AZ arm. For that reason, I considered the weight of my eyepieces for balance. Over time I collected the X Cell-LX series, mostly used from the classified's. They're parafocal making it easy to step up and down in magnification to find the sweet spot. 



#4 SloMoe

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 10:42 AM

What's your budget?

 

Could just buy a zoom, the 8-24's are about perfect for that scope.

 

Swapping out eyepiece for eyepiece, re focus for each, the key to less frustration is the LX X-Cel series that's parafocal like PNW suggested, bit more fov than the zoom's have

 

Not sure there's any advantage to 2" glass so the 1.25" light path is the most economical.


Edited by SloMoe, 01 August 2020 - 10:42 AM.


#5 p51dplt

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 04:31 PM

What's your budget?

 

Could just buy a zoom, the 8-24's are about perfect for that scope.

 

Swapping out eyepiece for eyepiece, re focus for each, the key to less frustration is the LX X-Cel series that's parafocal like PNW suggested, bit more fov than the zoom's have

 

Not sure there's any advantage to 2" glass so the 1.25" light path is the most economical.

Budget is $100-$150 a piece for a decent eyepiece. There is just so many options to look at. I do wear glasses so something with a good eye relief is something to consider as well. I would like something with a good FOV as well. 



#6 Jethro7

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 07:40 PM

Hello, 

The first things here, I am with Marty. Especially items 1 - 3 the fourth is almost allways a issue to some extent. Do a simple star test with the highest power Eyepiece you have.I've never tried it with a Barlow will have to do that tonight. Any way find a bright star and unfocus your scope till you see a donut the donut hole should be dead center. If it is not then you need to collimate. Sometimes when you do this you will see the  donut will have a flattened  edge or spikey on one edge this is the tube currents, thats the heat inside the scope body, a 8" is usually not too bad here. The collimation procedure is awkward at first and after a few times its becomes easy. It is a skill that has to be Mastered sooner or later. Thierry LeGaults web site on collimation helped me understand how to collimate.

 

http://www.astrophoto.fr/collim.html

 

But dont touch anything unless you need to. I made the typical Rookie mistake thinking blurry viewing  was do to collimation issues and it was just less than perfect seeing conditions. 

A really good eyepiece that I use a lot is the Baader 8X24 Hyperion Zoom with 2.5 Barlow. This eyepiece covers most of the power ranges. Until I invested in high end TV and ES ultra wide angle eyepieces my favorite was the TV 32mm Plossl. 

I have the C8 scope myself after I learned how to collimate it the views are outstanding. Mine was not collimated well from the factory or it fell out of collimation being shipped.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro


Edited by Jethro7, 01 August 2020 - 08:00 PM.

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#7 p51dplt

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Posted Yesterday, 01:23 AM

Hello, 

The first things here, I am with Marty. Especially items 1 - 3 the fourth is almost allways a issue to some extent. Do a simple star test with the highest power Eyepiece you have.I've never tried it with a Barlow will have to do that tonight. Any way find a bright star and unfocus your scope till you see a donut the donut hole should be dead center. If it is not then you need to collimate. Sometimes when you do this you will see the  donut will have a flattened  edge or spikey on one edge this is the tube currents, thats the heat inside the scope body, a 8" is usually not too bad here. The collimation procedure is awkward at first and after a few times its becomes easy. It is a skill that has to be Mastered sooner or later. Thierry LeGaults web site on collimation helped me understand how to collimate.

 

http://www.astrophoto.fr/collim.html

 

But dont touch anything unless you need to. I made the typical Rookie mistake thinking blurry viewing  was do to collimation issues and it was just less than perfect seeing conditions. 

A really good eyepiece that I use a lot is the Baader 8X24 Hyperion Zoom with 2.5 Barlow. This eyepiece covers most of the power ranges. Until I invested in high end TV and ES ultra wide angle eyepieces my favorite was the TV 32mm Plossl. 

I have the C8 scope myself after I learned how to collimate it the views are outstanding. Mine was not collimated well from the factory or it fell out of collimation being shipped.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro

Thanks for the info and advice. I checked the collimation tonight and it seems to be really good. I know the conditions are not great with the almost full moon and here in NorCal we have a lot of smoke and haze in the air. I am looking forward to getting a darker sky and hopefully less particulates in the air in the coming weeks so I can get out and see some good stuff. 

 

I'm looking into a zoom lens of some kind, just have not decided which manufacturer to go with yet. Any recommendations are greatly appreciated. 

 

I was trying to find some of the Orion Stratus series, but it seems they are not longer in production. Are the Badder EP's of decent quality? What about Celestron's Luminos series???

 

Thanks!



#8 Tony Flanders

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Posted Yesterday, 03:46 AM

I'm looking into a zoom (eyepiece) of some kind, just have not decided which manufacturer to go with yet. Any recommendations are greatly appreciated.


The Baader 8-24 is indisputably the best, but the Celestron 8-24 is much cheaper and not far behind in quality.



#9 LDW47

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Posted Yesterday, 08:44 AM

My new Orion E series zoom is not a bad ep and it is almost parafocal, just a little tweaking between x’s and the Svbony zoom I think is the same for about $20 cheaper ie $50. If you grab one you can’t go wrong in any way and you will use it on those quick view, time is of the essence, nites !  Good Luck and Clear Skize !



#10 LDW47

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Posted Yesterday, 08:48 AM

Thanks for the info and advice. I checked the collimation tonight and it seems to be really good. I know the conditions are not great with the almost full moon and here in NorCal we have a lot of smoke and haze in the air. I am looking forward to getting a darker sky and hopefully less particulates in the air in the coming weeks so I can get out and see some good stuff. 

 

I'm looking into a zoom lens of some kind, just have not decided which manufacturer to go with yet. Any recommendations are greatly appreciated. 

 

I was trying to find some of the Orion Stratus series, but it seems they are not longer in production. Are the Badder EP's of decent quality? What about Celestron's Luminos series???

 

Thanks!

I had the 2”-23mm and the 15-10mm 1.25” Luminos and that 82° FOV is great but the 2” eps are quite heavy. I sold the 23mm !



#11 Jethro7

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Posted Yesterday, 08:52 AM

Thanks for the info and advice. I checked the collimation tonight and it seems to be really good. I know the conditions are not great with the almost full moon and here in NorCal we have a lot of smoke and haze in the air. I am looking forward to getting a darker sky and hopefully less particulates in the air in the coming weeks so I can get out and see some good stuff. 

 

I'm looking into a zoom lens of some kind, just have not decided which manufacturer to go with yet. Any recommendations are greatly appreciated. 

 

I was trying to find some of the Orion Stratus series, but it seems they are not longer in production. Are the Badder EP's of decent quality? What about Celestron's Luminos series???

 

Thanks!

Good morning,

That's is good on the collimation, The star test is easy and quick. The Moon is very bright and that does over power many DSO's but that just makes me put in a variable polarizing filter and view the moon for awhile along with Jupiter that's hanging around very near in the skies. There is always something interesting to view I never get tired of just watching the moon. If you view the moon through out its phases the surface details change and I find that fascinating.I keep trying to see the Lunar lander first stages,I know its Impossable but I can try LOL. The seeing conditions are a main issue. Here in Florida, our best viewing season is between November and February when the skies are clear and cold. Our issue here during the summer, is we have a ocean of moisture from the Gulf of Mexico high in the atmosphere that affects our seeing conditions, it appears as a haze.

 

I started out with a Celestron 8X24 Zoom and a Celestron Barlow, they gave me many nights of great service and now are being enjoyed by a friend of mine. I replaced the Celestron, with the Baader Hyperion 8X24 Zoom with their 2.5 Barlow. It gives a wider field of view and is a little crisper.  Their is nothing wrong with the Celestron Zoom and Barlow it works very well and is a lot cheaper. I have become a big fan of Baader products they have yet to disappoint me. I think they make one of the best Diagonals you can get. This was my plan for this year to upgrade my gear in the light path to higher quality items better Diagonals higher end filters Badder ClickLock systems. Yes you can tell the difference.

 

I started in this Hobby with your scopes little brother th C6SE Nextsar. I enjoyed it very much. I still own that little SCT but the mount has found a good home. Mine is now on a modified ES Twilight 1 mount.The coolest thing that I bought for the Celestron SE mount was Celestrons Starsense and WiFi ( dont buy the GPS, you don't need it) downloaded Celestrons Skyportal on a tablet. This made the mount stupid easy to set up and get going. You can learn the skies quickly  as long as you pay attention. It makes star hopping a breeze. Also get these three books, they realy helped me and still help me.

 

" Night Watch" Revised fourth Edition by Terrence Dickerson

 

"The Backyard Astronomers Guide" Revised and Expanded  third Edition by Terrence Dickerson and Alan Dyer

 

" Turn Left at Orion" by Guy Consolmagno and Dan M. Davis

 

"The Hichhikers Guid to the Galaxy" the five book Trillogy by Doug Adams You wont learn anything important about Astronomy or much of anything else from these books and their is a possibility that reading these books could cause severe brain damage but you will have fun.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro


Edited by Jethro7, Yesterday, 09:34 AM.



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