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need eyepeice to impress wife

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#1 jimhoward999

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 11:42 AM

I just bought a celestron AVX mount and 8" edge HD telescope.  I am an astronomy complete beginner, but I am a lens designer by trade so know optics in general  fairly well.   I need one or two eyepieces that will produce pleasing images of the moon and Jupiter the cost of the telescope wont create too much marital strife.

 

A first question is on the star diagonal.  The telescope is supposedly corrected over a 42mm field.   And if I want to present a field that is 2 full moons wide then that is about 35mm (my telescope EFL is 2032mm).  Both of those numbers are bigger than 1.25" (31.75mm).   Do I need to replace the 1.25" star diagonal with a 2" version?   It seems like I do.

 

A second question is on the best apparent FOV.  A 40mm eyepiece came with my telescope. The apparent FOV looks to be about 40 degrees, maybe less.  Seems uncomfortably narrow.   What is the best choice?  I see eyepieces with crazy wide FOVs, like 100 degrees for sale.  But it would seem like with such a wide field the eye relief would have to be really short and that would be uncomfortable. Does anyone have experience with these?

 

I thought ideal for me might be something around 65 or 70 degrees apparent FOV and a focal length of around 25mm or 30mm would be good for my "impress the wife"  need and maybe with a 2" diagonal.   Is my thinking all wrong?

 

Your help would be appreciated.   

 

   
 


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#2 SloMoe

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 11:59 AM

OK, a TV Panoptic 15mm & a GSO 2.5X Tele-extender

 

Great views of anything. 



#3 Jeffmar

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 12:03 PM

The eyepiece I use the most with my SCT’s is an Orion 38mm Q70. It is a two inch eyepiece with 70 degree apparent field, and the eye relief is at least 20mm. I think it is about 120 dollars. You will need a 2 inch diagonal for it which adds to the cost, but I think it’s worth it. I will never go back to plossls. They are like looking through a straw. 

 

There is also a 32mm model if you prefer more magnification. I like that one also.


Edited by Jeffmar, 01 August 2020 - 12:05 PM.


#4 KTAZ

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 12:13 PM

OP is asking about a good eyepiece for the moon and Jupiter. 40mm is a wide field piece and I don't think that will hit his sweet spot.

 

Giving us a price point would be really helpful.

 

Yes, there are a lot of wide field EP's out there, but remember that the wider the field, the smaller will be the presentation of the object. This is purely perception, but you may "think" the target image looks smaller when there is a lot more black starry sky surrounding it.

 

If you are looking for moon craters, not the whole disk, and Jupiter and perhaps its moons, I'd go with something in the 12-15mm range. The TV 15mm Panoptic mentioned above would be a great choice, but is not made anymore and would have to be bought used. A 14mm or 12.5mm Baader Morpheus is $239 new.

 

EDIT: I am very happy with the Celestron 2" mirror diagonal with XLT coatings and it would work very well with that scope.


Edited by KTAZ, 01 August 2020 - 12:15 PM.


#5 Berny

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 12:21 PM

You can use this to see what you will see.

 

https://astronomy.to.../field_of_view/



#6 Blackbelt76

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 12:26 PM

I purchased (2) two inch eyepieces from Explore Scientific and could not be happier. 

Comparing with some others at twice the price, I could not detect much difference; at least not 200 dollars of diff.

The 82 degree models just rock IMO. 


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#7 Chesterguy1

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 12:27 PM

You mean you can't just impress your wife with your god looks and charm? lol.gif  I doubt a legion of TV Ethos and Leica EPs would move my wife to even luke warm interest in the equipment. She will deign to look through the scopes from time to time, but she says that my quest fo ever more elusive objects have "removed all the poetry and magic" from the experience.

 

Chesterguy



#8 B 26354

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 01:12 PM

In my view ( lol.gif ), your thinking is fine.

 

Modern wide-AFOV eyepieces seem to inherently have excellent eye-relief. With my C8, my 2-inch Explore Scientific 40mm 68° has a 31mm eye-relief, and gives 50X with a 1.4° TFOV. Views of the Moon, M42, and the Sagittarius Milky Way are spectacular. It is however, the size of a hand-grenade, and weighs 35.2 ounces, so it's a little unwieldy... and depending on your mounting setup and strength, can necessitate re-balancing.

 

My 32mm TeleVue WF 65° (only available used) gives 63X with a 1.03° TFOV, 19mm eye-relief, weighs half as much as the ES 40mm (17.6 ounces)... and is far-and-away my favorite low-power eyepiece. There are similar modern eyepieces available, such as the 2" ES 68° 34mm, which weighs ~24 oz.

 

More reasonably-priced options from ES are the Bresser 70° 30mm and 35mm eyepieces.

 

As has been mentioned, something shorter -- around 10mm to 15mm -- will give nice views of Jupiter and Saturn.

 

grin.gif



#9 SloMoe

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 01:47 PM

14mm ES 82°, 11mm ES 82°, & ES 8mm.

 

If your wife needs to be impressed, then put the ES 82° 8mm in and focus on the moon, no other target



#10 whizbang

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 01:52 PM

If you want to impress your wife, you need 82 degree or wider eyepieces. 

 

The least expensive top performer is the Explore Scientific 14mm 82 degree (145 power).

 

At lower powers, you move into two inch eyepieces.  You can't go wrong with a ES 24-82 or 22mm Nagler.

 

The classic spacewalk eyepiece is the Nagler 31T5, of course, if you have to ask, you can't afford it.  ES has a 30mm-82 that is a little more affordable.

 

I recommend not going to 6 - 8- 10mm eyepieces unless you seeing conditions are typically excellent.


Edited by whizbang, 01 August 2020 - 01:53 PM.


#11 Michael Covington

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 03:15 PM

I have never particularly enjoyed 2-inch eyepieces or super-wide fields of view.  Even mid-range eyepieces nowadays have a much wider field of view than they used to.

 

I use a Tele Vue mirror diagonal and a DeLite 18mm eyepiece almost all the time.



#12 Hax

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 03:21 PM

This guy is doing astronomy right!



#13 SloMoe

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 05:27 PM

or wear a monocle,

 

I use one whenever I'm trying to impress someone,,,,,,,


Edited by SloMoe, 01 August 2020 - 05:28 PM.

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#14 Jethro7

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 05:53 PM

I just bought a celestron AVX mount and 8" edge HD telescope.  I am an astronomy complete beginner, but I am a lens designer by trade so know optics in general  fairly well.   I need one or two eyepieces that will produce pleasing images of the moon and Jupiter the cost of the telescope wont create too much marital strife.

 

A first question is on the star diagonal.  The telescope is supposedly corrected over a 42mm field.   And if I want to present a field that is 2 full moons wide then that is about 35mm (my telescope EFL is 2032mm).  Both of those numbers are bigger than 1.25" (31.75mm).   Do I need to replace the 1.25" star diagonal with a 2" version?   It seems like I do.

 

A second question is on the best apparent FOV.  A 40mm eyepiece came with my telescope. The apparent FOV looks to be about 40 degrees, maybe less.  Seems uncomfortably narrow.   What is the best choice?  I see eyepieces with crazy wide FOVs, like 100 degrees for sale.  But it would seem like with such a wide field the eye relief would have to be really short and that would be uncomfortable. Does anyone have experience with these?

 

I thought ideal for me might be something around 65 or 70 degrees apparent FOV and a focal length of around 25mm or 30mm would be good for my "impress the wife"  need and maybe with a 2" diagonal.   Is my thinking all wrong?

 

Your help would be appreciated.   

 

   
 

Hello Jim,

My favorite eyepieces for that telescope are TV 10mm Ethos 100°at 203.2 X,  ES20mm 100° at 101.6 X, and a TV 31mm Nagler type 5, 82° at 65 54 X, I started with a WO 2" Star Diagonal and I thought that was a great Diagonal till I tried a Baader Zeiss prism Star Diagonal, the difference was very apparent the Baader diagonal is amazing. Back to the eyepieces, these eyepieces give you the feeling that you need to hold on to something when you look through them because you might fall into them and fall out into Space, some call it Space walking. The TV10mm Ethos is my favorite Lunar and planetary eyepiece, its like looking out the portal af Apollo 11,

And the ES20mm and TV31mm both frame the full moon in very nicely as with many star clusters and Nebulae. Out of all the eyepieces I own I really only use 5 of them for the simple reason the views impress me the most.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro


Edited by Jethro7, 01 August 2020 - 05:55 PM.


#15 SeattleScott

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 06:19 PM

The problem with ultrawide and hyperwide eyepieces is distortion. Filling the view with the Moon at 180x is quite impressive, as long as one doesn’t look too close at the edges. So a 13 Ethos or APM HDC could be the way to go for initial wow factor. But for critical examination of the Moon, it can be better to stay at around 70 AFOV or less. A 17.5 Morpheus or 17.3 Delos should fit the entire Moon in the view with minimal distortion, and plenty of immersive eye relief. Then you could get a shorter focal length for zooming in more.

You can fit the Moon in comfortably with 1.25” eyepieces. Until we get a second Moon, there isn’t much need for a 2” diagonal if you are focused on the Moon.

Scott
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#16 jimhoward999

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 07:53 PM

Thank you for your common sense comment Cosmos.   I was thinking that I wanted to have the moon to fill half the FOV and still not vignette the edge of the full FOV.  But now I realize that is unnecessary.   Adding for example a Baader clicklock adapter and a 2" diagonal (so giant eyepieces dont flop all over the place during initial slew) and a wide angle eyepiece is luxurious, and I'm kind of lusting after that, but it is about $650+ worth of kit.  Better to just get a 17.5mm morpheus eyepiece, hook it to the 1.25" diagonal and call it a day.     For close ups I can just throw in a cheap-o 7-21mm or 8-24mm zoom.



#17 Brent Campbell

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 08:07 PM

Thank you for your common sense comment Cosmos.   I was thinking that I wanted to have the moon to fill half the FOV and still not vignette the edge of the full FOV.  But now I realize that is unnecessary.   Adding for example a Baader clicklock adapter and a 2" diagonal (so giant eyepieces dont flop all over the place during initial slew) and a wide angle eyepiece is luxurious, and I'm kind of lusting after that, but it is about $650+ worth of kit.  Better to just get a 17.5mm morpheus eyepiece, hook it to the 1.25" diagonal and call it a day.     For close ups I can just throw in a cheap-o 7-21mm or 8-24mm zoom.

18mm explore scientific 82 degree will do what you want.  Another eyepiece is the panoptic 35 mm.  If your sticking with the 1.25 inch diagonal go with an explore 68 24 mm (which is a great eyepiece).

 

as for the diagonal.  Go with a gso 2 inch diagonal with an sct connection.  Some will say go with the refractor diagonals but your not taking pictures yet so no big deal.

 

since you bought and edge how about an explore scientific 30 mm 82 degree for the widest fov possible from a c8.


Edited by Brent Campbell, 01 August 2020 - 08:10 PM.


#18 KTAZ

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 08:11 PM

I think you will enjoy any Morpheus in the 12.5mm-17mm area. Not sure if I’d bother with he zoom...you will likely be disappointed with the limited FOV.



#19 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 11:40 PM

A 2" 30mm eyepiece is good for producing a wider field of view but Jupiter, and Saturn and Mars for that matter, at 68x is going to be very small.  The Moon won't be very large either.  It will be useful on larger extended objects like some open clusters.
 

I owned a 15mm Tele Vue Panoptic at one time but sold it.  The 10 millimeters of eye relief is very short considering the focal length of the eyepiece.  The 19mm Panoptic is fine, however, and for a long time it was one of my favorite eyepieces.

Given good seeing, a magnification of about 200 to 250x should produce a pleasing view of Jupiter.  A 72-degree 10mm Tele Vue Delos or a 70-degree 10mm Pentax SMC XW will do a fine job at the low end of that range.  (I use a 10mm Delos fairly often with my only SCT, a 6" Celestron NexStar Evolution.)

 

https://www.astronom...iece_series=518

 

An 8.8mm Explore Scientific 82-degree eyepiece will yield 231x and might be worth considering.

 

https://www.astronom...iece_series=498
 

Purchasing from Astronomics will help to support Cloudy Nights and garner you a small discount.

 

https://www.cloudyni...y_discount.html


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#20 Tony Flanders

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Posted 02 August 2020 - 04:18 AM

A first question is on the star diagonal.  The telescope is supposedly corrected over a 42mm field.   And if I want to present a field that is 2 full moons wide then that is about 35mm (my telescope EFL is 2032mm).  Both of those numbers are bigger than 1.25" (31.75mm).   Do I need to replace the 1.25" star diagonal with a 2" version?   It seems like I do.


Your arithmetic and conclusions are correct. But if you're concerned with observing the Moon, there's no need to have a field twice as wide. A modest margin of black sky is altogether adequate for observing the disk as a whole, and you can achieve that easily enough with a 1.25-inch diagonal. The benefits of a 2-inch diagonal would be for deep sky, not the Moon and planets.

Most serious lunar observing is done at magnifications where only a small piece of the Moon fits in the field of view at one time. That's just the nature of the game.


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#21 SeaBee1

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Posted 02 August 2020 - 08:40 AM

I'll try to be gentle...

 

While I admire the attempt to impress one's significant other, the effort is usually wasted... and costly with this hobby. I too wanted to impress my wife... at first...

 

She took a look at the moon... Jupiter... Saturn... and then went back inside to do whatever it is she does whenever I am outside with the equipment. In fairness, she was duly "impressed" by the moon, Jupiter looked "nice", Saturn actually got a "Wow!"... that was 5 years ago... I can hardly get her out for Saturn now.

 

My point is this... get the eyepieces you need to serve YOUR viewing pleasure... If all you want to see is the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn, stick with eyepiece focal lengths that will deliver around 100x to around 150x (in your 8" Edge, around 25mm to 12mm) and AFOV should be a secondary consideration for those targets. Plossl eyepieces should work fine in that scope and eye relief should still be fine with the 12mm.

 

And, when you want to look at other targets, those eyepieces will still be useful while you research additional choices...

 

That's my 2 pennies worth and worth about that much...

 

Good hunting!

 

CB


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#22 LDW47

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Posted 02 August 2020 - 08:52 AM

If you are getting one just to impress the wife then get one and have it gold plated, lol ! That will impress her no doubt, until she sees the price, lol !  Good Luck !



#23 SloMoe

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Posted 02 August 2020 - 09:13 AM

Usually when one isn't that interested in viewing the heavens, not much is going to wow them into submission of the expenditure.


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#24 PeterAB

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 12:39 PM

Hello,

 

I would go for an easy to use eyepiece.    Eye relief not too long to reduce blackouts.    Not too short to work with glasses and keep the eyeball a reasonable distance for the front lens.    Watch out for eyepieces that "kidney bean" (spherical aberration of the exit pupil).   If you are a Celestron guy, I'd suggest trying a 25mm X-cel.   It should work and I if you don't like it they are very easy to sell. 

 

The nice thing about your telescope and mount is that it is easy to get the eyepiece at a ergonomic viewing height.     Use an observation stool/chair.

 

Fortunately, my wife enjoys observing.    We both like easy comfortable viewing. 

 

Peter 



#25 BGazing

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 12:41 PM

I'll try to be gentle...

 

While I admire the attempt to impress one's significant other, the effort is usually wasted... and costly with this hobby. I too wanted to impress my wife... at first...

 

She took a look at the moon... Jupiter... Saturn... and then went back inside to do whatever it is she does whenever I am outside with the equipment. In fairness, she was duly "impressed" by the moon, Jupiter looked "nice", Saturn actually got a "Wow!"... that was 5 years ago... I can hardly get her out for Saturn now.

 

 

Preach it, brother...


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