Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

First Light - Deep Space Explorer 10"

  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 JustAnotherScott

JustAnotherScott

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 132
  • Joined: 07 May 2020

Posted 03 August 2020 - 08:54 AM

Deep Space Explorer 10” f/4.5
Bortle 8/9, Norfolk VA

 

I purchased this telescope from a club member. The secondary was extremely out of adjustment, so much so the previous owner thought it needed to be replaced. The actual issue was the adjustment screws and plate have been run out to their full length. After removing the secondary and resetting the adjustment screws and plate I was able to coliminate it with out issue. Focuser was broken when I purchased it. I replaced it with a used single speed 2” Crayford.

 

  • Note for other beginners, none of this was terribly hard it just required caution and patience.
  • All comparisons are too my Zhumell Z130.
  • Used GPS compass on phone and inclinometer to push to.

 

1930: placed scope outside to get to correct outside temperature.

 

0900:
Saturn and Jupiter – very low ~ 15 – 20 degrees.
Saturn -Lots of shimmering. Bad seeing. Cassini division shimmers in and out. That never happened with z130 at this alt. Banding on planet easily visible. On z130 this requires great seeing ( IME so far )
Jupiter – bands extremely visible and show more detail. Can see more than just the 2 main ones. Can see more than Galilean moons maybe 4 or 5 more. Still shimmering

 

2230:
Using log magnification 32mm meade 4000 (38x) found M13 almost directly overhead. Even thought FOV is narrower it was much easier to find than on z130. Its much brighter and its unique fuzzy look more obvious. Tried various combinations of eyepieces.

  • 32mm – small fuzzy dot looks like comet.
  • 25mm K with and without barlow ( ~40x and 80x ) – fuzzy comet lookinging thing
  • 6.5mm Meade HD-60 – WOW!!! Looks like diamond dust. Everything sparkles. Absolutely beautiful. Followed for 30 – 40 minutes. Stunning view. I can see what looks like “arms”. Notes say looks like

Attempt to see nearby IC 5115 failed too dim.

 

1131 – Found M15 using phone compass and inclinometer,.
All magnifications same. Looks like bit of fuzzy cotton. Unable to resolve any stars. 32mm Framed by trio of stars. Lower left one ( in eyepiece so opposite in reality ) is brown. I think the 10 allowed me to see the fuzziness better and spot these DSO’s at low magnification. Everything is brighter obviously.

25mm with 2x barlow. Can see 2 extremely faint stars inside triangle of stars. Triangle is 2 mag 6 stars  and one mag 5 so these very faint ones are less than that. Very hard to make them out but they are there.

 

Looks most like cotton with 6.5mm

 

0000 – Jupiter just came out from behind tree. Around 30 degreess in sky. Very steady seeing here. Easily see great red spot!! Looks very much like pictures. IN z130 with steading seeing at 200x it would be dim and a little washed out but could see some details. Comparatively though it blows it away. Can see many many details in bands and patterns. GRS is salmon as everyone reports. Bands are browns and grey/blue. Can see some whirls. Suspect I could use more magnification on this but no suitable eyepiece. Couldn’t get enough travel in focuser for 1.5 barlow on 6.5mm. Stunning!!

 

0030 Saturn – one band very visible. Cassini division steady and obvious. Stunning.

 

Mars – no detail too low just looks like Venus a bit. Can see a phase.

 

Overall - WOW!

 

Compared to my z130 this thing dirty mirror and all just blows it away. I still love my z130 and will use it often. Lugging the 10” around is very doable but for nights where I just want to spend an hour I’d prefer the z130. Also for travel the z130 is easy. Can’t wait to take the 10” to a darker site. I suspect I could resolve M13 more.

 

Also Open clusters are really disappointing in the 10”. The FOV is too narrow to really appreciate them. Maybe a 2” eyepiece would help.


Edited by JustAnotherScott, 03 August 2020 - 08:58 AM.

  • mfoose, Second Time Around and Tangerman like this

#2 JustAnotherScott

JustAnotherScott

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 132
  • Joined: 07 May 2020

Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:05 AM

Also.. I didn't spend much time on moon but it would take all magnifications. I put the barlow on my 6.5mm and got to a ridiculous 354x and it looked just fine. I did see a lot of floaters with a little fidgeting I got it to focus.



#3 mfoose

mfoose

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 745
  • Joined: 18 May 2013
  • Loc: Lancaster, PA

Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:37 AM

 

Overall - WOW!

 

Compared to my z130 this thing dirty mirror and all just blows it away. I still love my z130 and will use it often. Lugging the 10” around is very doable but for nights where I just want to spend an hour I’d prefer the z130. Also for travel the z130 is easy. Can’t wait to take the 10” to a darker site. I suspect I could resolve M13 more.

 

Also Open clusters are really disappointing in the 10”. The FOV is too narrow to really appreciate them. Maybe a 2” eyepiece would help.

Great to hear!

 

Deep Space Explorers are one of the Dobs I keep an eye out for because their mirrors were made by Discovery Telescopes, which Terry Ostahowski was a part of. Even in the DSE owners manual they say the mirrors are pyrex and were hand figured. Sounds like you got a good one.

 

2" wide FoV EPs are a treat in my 10". I have a Nagler 22T4 and an Explore Scientific 30mm 82* and I love them on many objects, like M13 and M42. That said, it is ultimately the optical design that limits the FoV so you can only get so wide of a FoV with a 2" EP. With your 10" f/4.5 and the widest FoV 2" EP, a 41mm Panoptic, you would get 2.3* FoV. I use Televue's eyepiece calculator:http://www.televue.c...LCULATE#results Some open clusters look great in my 10", others not so much. I use my 8* FoV 8x42 binoculars for the really wide ones.

 

One thing I would look to do it I was you is make vent holes in the back of the mirror cell, assuming it is still original. Allowing air to flow around the mirror help it cool faster and keep ambient temperature is crucial. I even made a fan system for mine with simple 80mm computer fans. It definitely helps.


Edited by mfoose, 03 August 2020 - 09:43 AM.

  • JustAnotherScott likes this

#4 JustAnotherScott

JustAnotherScott

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 132
  • Joined: 07 May 2020

Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:46 AM

Great to hear!

 

Deep Space Explorers are one of the Dobs I keep an eye out for because their mirrors were made by Discovery Telescopes, which Terry Ostahowski was a part of. Even in the DSE owners manual they say the mirrors are pyrex and were hand figured. Sounds like you got a good one.

 

2" wide FoV EPs are a treat in my 10". I have a Nagler 22T4 and an Explore Scientific 30mm 82* and I love them on many objects, like M13 and M42. That said, it is ultimately the optical design that limits the FoV so you can only get so wide of a FoV with a 2" EP. With your 10" f/4.5 and the widest FoV 2" EP, a 41mm Panoptic, you would get 2.3* FoV. I use Televue's eyepiece calculator:http://www.televue.c...LCULATE#results Some open clusters look great in my 10", others not so much. I use my 8* FoV 8x42 binoculars for the really wide ones.

 

One thing I would look to do it I was you is make vent holes in the back of the mirror cell, assuming it is still original. Allowing air to flow around the mirror help it cool faster and keep ambient temperature is crucial. I even made a fan system for mine with simple 80mm computer fans. It definitely helps.

Nice link! Thank you.

Would it though? The exit pupil is 9mm for the 41mm. I'm not sure how the view changes when you exceed your max pupil.


Edited by JustAnotherScott, 03 August 2020 - 10:57 AM.

  • mfoose likes this

#5 mfoose

mfoose

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 745
  • Joined: 18 May 2013
  • Loc: Lancaster, PA

Posted 03 August 2020 - 11:45 AM

Nice link! Thank you.

Would it though? The exit pupil is 9mm for the 41mm. I'm not sure how the view changes when you exceed your max pupil.

Sorry, I was not saying a 41 Pan is ideal for your telescope. I was just using it to show you the max FoV possible for your scope. I would not recommend it because of the exit pupil. I would recommend an EP in the 30mm range with an 82* FoV. That would give you a 2.1* FoV with an exit pupil of 6.88mm. Many use and love the Nagler 31T5. I have an Explore Scientifc 30mm 82* because it is much cheaper used, basically half the price and I don't use it a ton, mostly used on wide open cluster or wide DSO's like M13. It was also a gem on NEOWISE. The Nagler 22T4 gets used much more in my 10" f/6 because of its magnification and exit pupil. Very pleasing and comfortable views. 


Edited by mfoose, 03 August 2020 - 11:48 AM.

  • JustAnotherScott likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics