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So, I blinded myself.

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#1 bwmarrin

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 08:55 AM

I read online that this was possible but I ignored all the warnings and I did this anyhow, I'm such a noob.

 

The other day I got the telescope out and got it all setup.  I got a 17mm eyepiece I wanted to try out.

 

I stick that in, I get it lined up, look though and bam, blinding light piercing my eyeball.  I look away and I see a huge moon shaped ball everywhere. My previous slight adaption to the dark night vanished and I was essentially blind, for a few seconds.

 

Heh smile.gif  But really, it was a full moon, or nearly so, so pretty bright.  I have a 8mm and 6mm I've used but they're so zoomed it you have to walk around the moon - which is totally cool.  But I wanted to see the whole moon in the view finder and tried out a 17mm (70x) and it was perfect.  Really cool and the kids where probably more impressed with that than the 6mm since they get a better sense of what they're looking at.

 

But, it's bright.  I enjoyed looking at it but it was a shock to my eye and I definitely saw a big moon sized spot in my vision for awhile after.

 

So I want to get a filter so I can do this again without going blind.  I'd prefer a quality one as I expect this is something I would keep forever, and I like to buy things once.  Any recommendations or advice on the different  types (remember I'm a total noob) and what to even look for?  

 

I want a 2" model and just enough to take the blinding edge off, I donno if that's a 50%, 25% or what.


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#2 Tangerman

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:06 AM

What's the aperture of your telescope? The larger it is, the more you may want to filter the moon.

I sometimes use my moon filter. Sometimes, though, I just decide I won't mind if I have a moon-shaped spot in my vision and I go for it sans filter.


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#3 KTAZ

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:18 AM

It may sound like the opposite of what you want, but if your evening target is the moon, just turn on your patio light to keep your eyes less dark adjusted.


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#4 BrettG

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:21 AM

Trying to get dark adapted on a Full Moon night, or near full moon night  - is a bad idea.  It is not likely to happen.

Sadly, especially in the summer - seems the only clear nights are near the full moon.


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#5 cst4

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:23 AM

By the title of this thread I thought you looked at the sun!  Glad it was just the bright moon.  I have a few moon filters of different transmissions, but my favorite solution is just to get a variable polorizing moon filter.  Some of them go from 1% to 40% light transmission which is awesome... covers all your moon observing needs no matter what size scope or how bright the moon is due to its phase.  2" ones are kind of expensive though.  Also note... I've tried about 4 moon filters now, a couple cheap and a couple expensive and I cannot tell a difference.


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#6 dusty99

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:26 AM

It can feel like a shock but your dark adaptation will come back pretty quickly.  In the meantime, use your other eye.  I sometimes use a moon filter, but just as often I'll just dedicate a night (or an hour) to the moon, then let my eye(s) re-adapt while I plan what to observe next.  You can also just end an observation session with the moon.

 

 

I read online that this was possible but I ignored all the warnings and I did this anyhow, I'm such a noob.

 

The other day I got the telescope out and got it all setup.  I got a 17mm eyepiece I wanted to try out.

 

I stick that in, I get it lined up, look though and bam, blinding light piercing my eyeball.  I look away and I see a huge moon shaped ball everywhere. My previous slight adaption to the dark night vanished and I was essentially blind, for a few seconds.

 


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#7 DSOGabe

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:28 AM

What you need to get yourself is an adjustable polarizing lunar filter. With those you can control the actual amount of light coming through. That is much better than a fixed percentage filter. 


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#8 bwmarrin

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:30 AM

What's the aperture of your telescope? The larger it is, the more you may want to filter the moon.

I sometimes use my moon filter. Sometimes, though, I just decide I won't mind if I have a moon-shaped spot in my vision and I go for it sans filter.

8" dob.



#9 bwmarrin

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:31 AM

It may sound like the opposite of what you want, but if your evening target is the moon, just turn on your patio light to keep your eyes less dark adjusted.

I did have the porch light on, and I also live in a densely packed inner city neighborhood with street lights, garage lights, porch lights all over..  It was just sooo bright, almost painful. 



#10 bwmarrin

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:33 AM

By the title of this thread I thought you looked at the sun!  Glad it was just the bright moon.  I have a few moon filters of different transmissions, but my favorite solution is just to get a variable polorizing moon filter.  Some of them go from 1% to 40% light transmission which is awesome... covers all your moon observing needs no matter what size scope or how bright the moon is due to its phase.  2" ones are kind of expensive though.  Also note... I've tried about 4 moon filters now, a couple cheap and a couple expensive and I cannot tell a difference.

Yeah, I figured a bit of dramatized title would be fun :).  A variable one does sound cool.  Do you have any recommended brands or specific ones I can look up?



#11 bwmarrin

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:35 AM

It can feel like a shock but your dark adaptation will come back pretty quickly.  In the meantime, use your other eye.  I sometimes use a moon filter, but just as often I'll just dedicate a night (or an hour) to the moon, then let my eye(s) re-adapt while I plan what to observe next.  You can also just end an observation session with the moon.

I guess part of what got me the most was when I stopped looking I just had this massive "spot" in my vision for several minutes, then each time I looked back in the scope it was kind of a shock to my eye I think.  Just a little uncomfortable.  I've had no problems with half moons/etc.



#12 bwmarrin

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:36 AM

What you need to get yourself is an adjustable polarizing lunar filter. With those you can control the actual amount of light coming through. That is much better than a fixed percentage filter. 

Do you have any brands or specific ones I could look up?  I don't really know who makes the quality ones vs meh ones or anything.  I just got my scope a couple weeks ago so I'm pretty much clueless on everything.



#13 SloMoe

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:40 AM

This is the one or type

https://agenaastro.c...1-25-94107.html

 

Also Neutral Density, N.D.ilters work very well, sometimes I stack them with a single polarize filter on full Moon,

 

I have a 10in. dob and use Ethos to get out and walk on the Moon.

 

https://agenaastro.c...ter-310245.html



#14 bwmarrin

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:42 AM

This is the one or type

https://agenaastro.c...1-25-94107.html

 

Also Neutral Density, N.D.ilters work very well, sometimes I stack them with a single polarize filter on full Moon,

 

I have a 10in. dob and use Ethos to get out and walk on the Moon.

 

https://agenaastro.c...ter-310245.html

 

Thanks!

So, what's the difference between the ND and Polarizing, in terms of looking at the moon?

 

Ethos eyepieces or is that something else?

 

EDIT: oh and I've never used agenaastro.com, is that a pretty good place to shop?


Edited by bwmarrin, 03 August 2020 - 09:43 AM.


#15 charlieb123

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:46 AM

Even my little 4" dob would give me a headache looking at the moon without a filter.

No thanks. IMO a filter is a necessity when looking at the moon.


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#16 cst4

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:51 AM

Yeah, I figured a bit of dramatized title would be fun smile.gif.  A variable one does sound cool.  Do you have any recommended brands or specific ones I can look up?

My variable one is 1.25" and it is a Lumicon that I got used for $30, but I think it is something like $80 new.  I honestly can't tell a difference between it and my $10 Chinese Meade one I got off Amazon, so I wouldn't get anything too expensive as I don't think the view quality varies much according to price.  I probably wouldn't get the cheapest either just to ensure you get something of decent quality that won't fall apart.  I think Orion and Celestron both sell variable polorizers.  I highly doubt there is much difference between any 2" variable polorizer you find. 

 

I typically use 1.25" orthos and plossls to view the moon so I bought a 1.25" variable polorizer... I pretty much always use a 2" diagonal though, and I realize now it would have been better to buy a 2" polorizer and put it on the 2" / 1.25" adapter.  That way I wouldn't have to unscrew it and re-screw it every eyepiece exchange.  One day I will switch to 2"... 



#17 bwmarrin

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 10:01 AM

My variable one is 1.25" and it is a Lumicon that I got used for $30, but I think it is something like $80 new.  I honestly can't tell a difference between it and my $10 Chinese Meade one I got off Amazon, so I wouldn't get anything too expensive as I don't think the view quality varies much according to price.  I probably wouldn't get the cheapest either just to ensure you get something of decent quality that won't fall apart.  I think Orion and Celestron both sell variable polorizers.  I highly doubt there is much difference between any 2" variable polorizer you find. 

 

I typically use 1.25" orthos and plossls to view the moon so I bought a 1.25" variable polorizer... I pretty much always use a 2" diagonal though, and I realize now it would have been better to buy a 2" polorizer and put it on the 2" / 1.25" adapter.  That way I wouldn't have to unscrew it and re-screw it every eyepiece exchange.  One day I will switch to 2"... 

Cool, thanks.  Yeah I don't mind buying the higher end stuff if it's worth it but, if there's no difference I can put that money into more eyepieces, right? :)

 

Heh, when I first got my scope and started reading about 1.25" vs 2" stuff and realized the AD8 has a 2" hole, I just thought.. Lets try to just do 2" for everything and hopefully have less adapters and such to fuss with.  I'm not sure if that'll work out but that's been my goal so far.



#18 SloMoe

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 10:08 AM

Thanks!

So, what's the difference between the ND and Polarizing, in terms of looking at the moon?

 

Ethos eyepieces or is that something else?

 

EDIT: oh and I've never used agenaastro.com, is that a pretty good place to shop?

Agena is an online vendor there are a lot of them, also this sites sponsor, Astronomic's has several pages of filters,

https://www.astronom...om/filters.html

 

Ethos are TeleVue's 100° fov eyepieces, in time you'll learn more about fov and what works well in your scope.

 

But for now wed're discussing Moon filters, 



#19 ButterFly

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 10:08 AM

Polarizers are the way to go.  The easiest way to use them is to have one fixed, and have the other on the eyepiece.  You can rotate the eyepiece with respect to the fixed one to adjust for the best visual contrast.

 

Variable polarizers are just two separate polarizers.  One has a ring that allows it to rotate while still screwed in to the other.  You don't really need that, depending on your setup.  If there is a fixed place to put one, just get regular polarizers.  Fixed places include: a diagonal; a 2"/1.25" adapter; a coma corrector ... .  Depending on your setup, one could be 2' and the other 1.25".  If there is no fixed place on your setup, the variable ones are the way to go, but you have to take out the eyepiece and guess.



#20 bwmarrin

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 10:14 AM

Polarizers are the way to go.  The easiest way to use them is to have one fixed, and have the other on the eyepiece.  You can rotate the eyepiece with respect to the fixed one to adjust for the best visual contrast.

 

Variable polarizers are just two separate polarizers.  One has a ring that allows it to rotate while still screwed in to the other.  You don't really need that, depending on your setup.  If there is a fixed place to put one, just get regular polarizers.  Fixed places include: a diagonal; a 2"/1.25" adapter; a coma corrector ... .  Depending on your setup, one could be 2' and the other 1.25".  If there is no fixed place on your setup, the variable ones are the way to go, but you have to take out the eyepiece and guess.

Cool, thanks.  That's an interesting idea and thanks for  breaking down how they work  - I love understanding those kinds of details.

 

So, I've got an AD8 8" dob, with a 2" focuser.  I just have my eye piece go directly into that without any adapters or anything else.

 

I'm actually mostly clueless what the diagonal is or coma corrector.

 

But I do like the idea of just being able to rotate the eyepiece to make the adjustments, that sounds very user friendly.



#21 SloMoe

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 10:16 AM

When it comes to Moon filters the idea is to cut down the glare until the details are easier to see, I use both methods, stacking an ND & polarize or the two polarize filters as described above, it all depends on how the seeing conditions permit.

 

Some people decide that the Moon is going to be a primary target for the night and just go ahead not use a filter at all, it's their eyeball, not mine.

 

OK, so the 17mm you'er using, is it 1.25"?


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#22 SloMoe

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 10:19 AM

This is a link to a YouTube channel, if you watch and keep on watching these video's you'll learn a lot, for free!

 

https://www.youtube....nomyAndNatureTV


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#23 kathyastro

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 10:23 AM

With a Dob, just put the variable polarizing filter in in one piece.  You'll have to take the eyepiece out to adjust the filtering.

 

The good news is that you won't damage your eyes looking at the Moon.  All it will do, unfiltered, is blow out your night vision for 20 or 30 minutes!


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#24 redtag

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 10:23 AM

Get out early before sunset...this has been some of my favorite times to look at the moon...something to do while waiting for the equipment to temperature equalize.  You won't need a filter because your eyes are still adjusted to daylight. 


Edited by redtag, 03 August 2020 - 10:25 AM.

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#25 bwmarrin

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 10:23 AM

When it comes to Moon filters the idea is to cut down the glare until the details are easier to see, I use both methods, stacking an ND & polarize or the two polarize filters as described above, it all depends on how the seeing conditions permit.

 

Some people decide that the Moon is going to be a primary target for the night and just go ahead not use a filter at all, it's their eyeball, not mine.

 

OK, so the 17mm you'er using, is it 1.25"?

It's a 2".




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