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Scope for Celestron AVX

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#1 Obone236

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 03:07 PM

Hello all! I have been researching for weeks. I am brand new at learning any of this. I have to say, this is the broadest and longest list of gear I have ever seen for a hobby. So many freaking choices and I need help. 

 

I have decided on an Celestron AVX Mount (Unless yall tell me why I am wrong)

I am trying to slowly build a system I can use during and along the build up. 

 

What I currently have

Cannon 90D

70-200mm Tamron 2.8

Star adventure pro

 

What I would like is

Celestron AVX

Scope that would work well on it ($700-$1000 ish Range)

So far I like DSO
Planetary would be fun

I will eventually get guide scope

Guide camera

Astro Camera

 

I have zero clue on the Scope. Thought I did but then the more I look the more confused I get. Also nothing is in stock anywhere it seems. 

 

Can anyone help guide me in a direction. Thank you very much for your help and assistance. Love that I found this site!


Edited by Obone236, 03 August 2020 - 03:12 PM.


#2 descott12

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 03:12 PM

I think you may be going about this the wrong way. You should figure out what you want to view/image and that will determine what scope to get. Then you will need to figure out what mount you will need.

 

Once you figure out the scope, I am sure there are plenty of CN members that can help determine the best choice for a mount.


Edited by descott12, 03 August 2020 - 03:12 PM.


#3 Obone236

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 03:16 PM

Descott12,

Thank you for the response. Hahah I was told to pick a mount that was in budget and then figure out glass to go on it. 

I do not know the limitations of each type of Telescope that kicks out the different DSOs or planetary viewing. 

 

Thank you again for your help. 



#4 Bean614

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 03:21 PM

Descott12,

Thank you for the response. Hahah I was told to pick a mount that was in budget and then figure out glass to go on it. 

I do not know the limitations of each type of Telescope that kicks out the different DSOs or planetary viewing. 

 

Thank you again for your help. 

"Hahah I was told to pick a mount that was in budget and then figure out glass to go on it."

 

You were flat out given the wrong advice!


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#5 Obone236

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 03:29 PM

Sweet



#6 descott12

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 03:32 PM

Unfortunately, there is no scope that does it all.

 

For DSO imaging, most would recommend a smallish refractor to start with. Maybe 60-80 mm. But I don't do this so get other opinions.

 

For planetary imaging, an 8" SCT would be a great start. I personally think that the SCT is great all purpose scope. You can reconfigure it from f2 to f20+ and do alot of different things with them and they are relatively portable.

 

For strictly visual, I think most would recommend a large DOB.

 

It really depends on what you want to do and certainly your experience level.



#7 Stelios

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 04:27 PM

I would like to talk you out of the Celestron AVX if you are interested in Astrophotography. The AVX is a great visual mount, but a very iffy astrophotography mount. Quality varies a LOT. You could get lucky--or not. 

 

Your best bet is between the iOptron CEM25P ($898) which has limited capacity, and the Orion Sirius ($1,099) or very similar HEQ5-Pro ($1,150). Yes, decent mounts (and these are the *low end* ones) are expensive. But the important thing with AP mounts is steady tracking, and those are the mounts that offer that. Without steady tracking you will never get good images. 

 

For a scope, choice depends on what mount you get and whether you like smaller or larger objects. With any of the above mounts you are limited to 70 to 100mm aperture scopes (ED or APO refractors). A 70mm scope is best for large objects. A 100mm scope will be better for smaller objects. An 80mm scope is in-between. The 100mm scope may be too much for the CEM25P. All scopes in this range will require a flattener and/or a reducer-flattener. Faster (F/6) scopes will gather signal at a faster rate than slower (F/7 or F/7.5) scopes. A reducer multiplies the native F/ratio of a scope--so a 0.8x reducer will make an F/7 scope into a much faster F/5.6 scope. 

 

Now that I said all that, choice of scopes is large, but my recommendations are between:

 

1) The Astrotech offerings (Astronomics website, our CN patron which offers a *small* discount to members as well). My recommendation is NOT based on that, we don't get paid or even get brownie points for referrals, I do think the Astrotech scopes in particular are among the best bang for the buck.
2) The William Optics offerings. William Optics has the prettiest scopes out there--they are also well thought out and function well as a system (they offer scope, guidescope, mountings for both, matched flatteners, the works--you can get a complete well-matched solution, a bit pricier usually for the same glass).

3) The Teleskop-Service scopes. This is an excellent company with well-thought-out offerings, do NOT be afraid to order from Germany, just watch the shipping cost, there will be no duty for under $2,500.

 

I should mention the Skywatcher scopes too--their Esprit line is excellent (but pricey). The Evostars IMO are a bit overpriced. 

 

Finally, a good mount-scope combo is available from Orion. You may be happy with that rather than try to make up your mind among too many bewildering offerings. It's definitely a good starter combo. 


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#8 Michael Covington

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 04:39 PM

Let me suggest adding to the mix a book about astrophotography.  There are many good ones.  And/or read Jerry Lodriguss's web site (astropix.com).

 

But to answer your first question, the AVX is a good match for small refractors such as the AT65EDQ.  (Not sure that particular one is still available, but it will give you an idea.)



#9 TelescopeGreg

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 04:56 PM

+1 to what Stelios said.

 

I have the AVX, and am doing DSO AP with it, but it's really marginal.  To be fair, getting the system to this point has been a great learning experience, and I know I'm pushing it for more that it is worth.  It took about a year of learning to get to this point, and I am glad I went through it, but that's just how I do things.

 

For many uses, the AVX is easy to use, light in weight, and has a lot of features, but it is specifically and famously not intended for deep sky imaging.  Using it in that role will be, um, interesting, in that it won't let you get away with doing anything sloppy.  That's good, in a back-handed sort of way, in that you won't be learning bad habits.  But if you don't already own one, or are not focusing on lunar and planetary imaging, or perhaps some wider-field deep sky (think Milky Way, or the larger, brighter nebulae) there are other mounts which are more purpose-built for doing DSO AP that might give you more depth in capability for the future.  It's probably ok for up to, say, and 80mm f/5 refractor.  I've way beyond that, and will be replacing mine as funds allow.




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