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4 doubles in Scorpius + EP Impressions

observing report double star
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#1 StarWager

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 04:14 PM

Friday, 7/31, 10pm - 11:30pm local time.

Transparency was less than normal for me .. I could see 3 stars in Ursa Minor, which is the norm, but the moon was bright.  The seeing conditions were Good, but not better than Good.  Stars were twinkling quite a bit, and my Dob at 171x was not resolving brighter stars sharply.

 

Still, it was the first clear night in over a week, and I would not be deterred! 

I went hunting doubles with my 80mm APO.

 

--  Beta Scorpii:  Also known as Graffias, which is a really cool name to me that means "the claws" in Italian.  This was easily split, and looked nice at 102x in my new E.S. 82 Series 4.7mm EP.  The brightest is significantly brighter than its companion.

 

--  Nu Scorpii:  This was the "Cool Find" of the night for me.  The AL Double Star observing list shows Nu Scorpii as a double with separation 41.4 arc-seconds.  Well, that was easy-peasy to split at 102x with my new EP.  But then, I noticed something "interesting" about the smaller companion ... was there a 3rd star right on the edge of that one??  At 137x I could just pick it out.  At 204x in the APO the image was not good enough to discern any better.  So I went to my 8" Dob and looked at 171x just to prove it to myself, and there I clearly saw separation in what I would later learn is "Nu Scorpii CD" in a system of at least 7 members.  I would like to learn what the separation is on this one, but have not been able to find it.  I am pretty happy that my eye picked up on it at 102x when it wasn't expected.

 

--  Xi Scorpii & Struve 1999:  At first I thought Xi Scorpii was a double-double, but later realized I was seeing both of these doubles in the same FOV.  The brightest star was definitely yellow in color, while the others were dimmer and difficult to see the colors.  These are easy to separate and looked best to me at 137x.

 

--  Rho Ophiuchi:  This was the "Bonus Find" of the night.  Yes, I know it is not in Scorpius, but while I was attempting to find M80 in Scorpius, I changed EP's down to 68x and moved to this close-by star to re-focus.  "Oh, WOW!" I exclaimed, "What is THIS star???"  3 stars in a triangle (like a 3-star flying V), and the point star is a double.  At 137x this was a great view.

 

 

New EP impressions:

This was my first light with the ES 82 Series 4.7mm.  This EP perfectly fills a gap, providing 102x.  It also allows 204x with the barlow, if seeing is good.  The large FOV looks good across, and I really enjoyed using it.  It is surprisingly small.  I have the same complaint as others, the 13.6mm eye relief doesn't feel like it.  In order to see the entire large FOV, my eyelashes touch, and then "look around" the FOV.  I found after a while, the "sweet spot" of not quite seeing the entire FOV and still being comfortable. (Note that the 4.7mm EP has the lowest ER of the set.) This is still a keeper for now since it was on sale for $100 less than the 5mm DeLite ... a great EP for that price.

 

That's about it!  Cheers everyone!

scott


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#2 chrysalis

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 06:01 PM

Friday, 7/31, 10pm - 11:30pm local time.

Transparency was less than normal for me .. I could see 3 stars in Ursa Minor, which is the norm, but the moon was bright.  The seeing conditions were Good, but not better than Good.  Stars were twinkling quite a bit, and my Dob at 171x was not resolving brighter stars sharply.

 

Still, it was the first clear night in over a week, and I would not be deterred! 

I went hunting doubles with my 80mm APO.

 

--  Beta Scorpii:  Also known as Graffias, which is a really cool name to me that means "the claws" in Italian.  This was easily split, and looked nice at 102x in my new E.S. 82 Series 4.7mm EP.  The brightest is significantly brighter than its companion.

 

--  Nu Scorpii:  This was the "Cool Find" of the night for me.  The AL Double Star observing list shows Nu Scorpii as a double with separation 41.4 arc-seconds.  Well, that was easy-peasy to split at 102x with my new EP.  But then, I noticed something "interesting" about the smaller companion ... was there a 3rd star right on the edge of that one??  At 137x I could just pick it out.  At 204x in the APO the image was not good enough to discern any better.  So I went to my 8" Dob and looked at 171x just to prove it to myself, and there I clearly saw separation in what I would later learn is "Nu Scorpii CD" in a system of at least 7 members.  I would like to learn what the separation is on this one, but have not been able to find it.  I am pretty happy that my eye picked up on it at 102x when it wasn't expected.

 

--  Xi Scorpii & Struve 1999:  At first I thought Xi Scorpii was a double-double, but later realized I was seeing both of these doubles in the same FOV.  The brightest star was definitely yellow in color, while the others were dimmer and difficult to see the colors.  These are easy to separate and looked best to me at 137x.

 

--  Rho Ophiuchi:  This was the "Bonus Find" of the night.  Yes, I know it is not in Scorpius, but while I was attempting to find M80 in Scorpius, I changed EP's down to 68x and moved to this close-by star to re-focus.  "Oh, WOW!" I exclaimed, "What is THIS star???"  3 stars in a triangle (like a 3-star flying V), and the point star is a double.  At 137x this was a great view.

 

 

New EP impressions:

This was my first light with the ES 82 Series 4.7mm.  This EP perfectly fills a gap, providing 102x.  It also allows 204x with the barlow, if seeing is good.  The large FOV looks good across, and I really enjoyed using it.  It is surprisingly small.  I have the same complaint as others, the 13.6mm eye relief doesn't feel like it.  In order to see the entire large FOV, my eyelashes touch, and then "look around" the FOV.  I found after a while, the "sweet spot" of not quite seeing the entire FOV and still being comfortable. (Note that the 4.7mm EP has the lowest ER of the set.) This is still a keeper for now since it was on sale for $100 less than the 5mm DeLite ... a great EP for that price.

 

That's about it!  Cheers everyone!

scott

YMMV, but for me when I fold down the eye cup the ER feels OK and bonus I seem to get a bit wider AFOV.



#3 Pete W

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 06:41 PM

Nice report Scott.  Coincidentally, I was touring Scorpius last night with my old 60mm f/11.7 Shrine Manon alt-az refractor in the backyard.  I tracked down the same four doubles/multiples you described with similar results, along with a few others.  The scope was in 0.965" mode with the 30mm (23x), 18mm (39X) and 12mm (58x) Kellners, 7.5mm (93x) Celestron Ultima and a 6mm (117x) ortho.   

 

I could split Nu Scorpii into 3 stars but not four.  The brightest of the system is a tight 1.3" pair that was beyond the range of my little refractor.   And Xi Scorpii is an easy "double double" with Struve 1999. 

 

I tried 2 Scorpii, a 5th and 7th mag pair at 2.1".  I thought it might be beyond the range of my little scope...and I was correct.  No split was discernible with the 6mm. 

 

From 2 Scorpii I headed south to 12 Scorpii, a 6th & 8th mag pair at about 4".  The split was hinted with the 18mm but obvious with the 6mm though the fainter companion was elusive with direct vision.

 

H N 39 is a bit eastward of 12 Scorpii.  A nice almost evenly matched 6th mag pair at 4.5".  Discernible with the 12mm but well seen in little refractor with the 7.5mm Ultima.

 

Southward brought BSO 12 into view.  An easy wide 6th & 7th mag white pair at 24".  The 18mm was the best view.

 

Then headed way south to eta Lupii at -38deg.  A fine uneven double (3.5 & 7.5 mag) at 15".  Very nice in the 7.5mm but the companion was a bit tougher than expected, likely because it was in the light dome of Austin, TX 


Edited by Pete W, 03 August 2020 - 06:41 PM.

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#4 StarWager

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 09:55 PM

Thanks Pete W, for adding on to my report!  I had a shorter list of targets than you.  It amazes me how many doubles can be found in a single constellation!

 

sw


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#5 nerich

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 10:59 PM

Nice report, Scott! Sounds like you're cruising around the sky with ease. 

Graffias is a favorite. It's one I remember looking at on my very first night of double star observing. Did you notice any color difference between the two components? They're both B-type stars, but to me the difference in magnitude makes the primary seem more yellowish and the secondary bluish (even green, sometimes). 


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#6 StarWager

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 07:58 AM

Nice report, Scott! Sounds like you're cruising around the sky with ease. 

Graffias is a favorite. It's one I remember looking at on my very first night of double star observing. Did you notice any color difference between the two components? They're both B-type stars, but to me the difference in magnitude makes the primary seem more yellowish and the secondary bluish (even green, sometimes). 

That night I noted that they both looked the same white color to me, with one much brighter.  It surprised me when I looked it up and saw they were B stars, because I would have expected a blue-ish tint.


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#7 MP173

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 09:54 AM

Scott:

Next time you are in Scorpio and view Nu Sco, slide east and slightly south about 2 degrees to Sh 225 and 226.

 

Another easy, but entertaining "double double" similar to STF 1998 and 1999.

 

These two systems are separated by 7' and are easily resolved with small scope:

 

Sh 225 - 7.4/8.1, 47" @ 333

Sh 226 - 7.6/8.3, 13" @ 20 degrees.

 

Also while at Graffias, go wide with your eyepiece and view the non physical double omega 1 and omega which are about 1 degree to the south and east.

 

I cant wait to resume exploring Scorpio now that the moon has tipped over and hopefully clear skys.

 

Ed


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#8 nerich

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 11:24 AM

That night I noted that they both looked the same white color to me, with one much brighter.  It surprised me when I looked it up and saw they were B stars, because I would have expected a blue-ish tint.

 

It's weird: B and O stars don't always look blue in the eyepiece. With double stars, contrasting spectra or not, all bets are off. Your eye is trying its best to make sense of what it's seeing, and anything can happen! 


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