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#1 xxjedixknightxx

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 06:48 PM

Hello everyone, new guy here... lol....

I Just bought my boys 17 and 11 a new telescope. Meade 70mm NG-70sm. It's not an expensive scope by any means. But I was wondering what are some of the cooler things in the night sky I can show them with this power scope, it came with a 25mm and 9mm lens. Tried showing them Jupiter last night but couldn't seem to get it focused, to see a great image. Should I try a barlow lens? 

 

Any help would be great.

 

Thanks



#2 Xeroid

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 06:53 PM

No, not to worry, Jupiter is low on the horizon for most Northern folks combined with "foggy" weather your view is normal.

 

Try viewing the Moon..


Edited by Xeroid, 03 August 2020 - 06:59 PM.

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#3 MikiSJ

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 07:05 PM

Don't you hate being the 'new guy'.

 

The Moon, Jupiter and Saturn would be good places to start as they are all up tonight. If your telescope came with a planetarium program, you could look some of the bright star clusters.

 

Try for the double star Mizar in the handle of the "Big Dipper" (Ursa Major) it is an easy but pretty pair of blue stars. Also, the binary star Albiero in the constellation "the Swan" (Cygnus) is a really beautiful double star with a golden main star and a blue secondary. Both of these stars are easy in the telescope your bought your kids.

 

If you are close to a very dark site, then a 70mm telescope will see a lot - a really big lot of good stuff.

 

Celestron has a downloadable planetarium program, SkyPortal for use on Android phones. You can download it from the Google store.


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#4 JohnBear

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 07:31 PM

There are several very good books for beginners: Turn Left at Orion and NightWatch are often cited. BTW you don't need to pay for the latest edition (and older editions can be found dirt cheap). The sky really has not changed a whole lot in the last 20,000 years.

 

You kids will love this; There are several free/low cost PC and smartphone planetarium apps that can do magical things! Stellarium is even available online for free.

 

Have lot of fun!


Edited by JohnBear, 03 August 2020 - 07:32 PM.

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#5 ShaulaB

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 07:43 PM

Don't use the Barlow with the lower focal length eyepiece, and you will be much happier.

 

As has been mentioned, the Sky Safari app on a tablet is a great resource. The Milky Way is arching overhead now in the evening, providing lots of fun star clusters to view.

 

If you have access to a printer, the monthly Skymap at Skymaps.com is another nice resource to have. http://skymaps.com/s...s/tesmn2008.pdf  On the front is the map and a calendar of highlights for the month. On the back is a list of objects that can be viewed naked eye, with binoculars, and with a small telescope. Try hunting down the binocular objects for fun.

 

One of my observing friends built a Dobsonian telescope with his daughter. This is something you guys can do together when you have graduated from the scope you have now. Richard Berry has written a fine book on how to make your own telescope, with detailed plans for several designs.


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#6 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 07:52 PM

You may find the information on observing and other aspects of amateur astronomy presented in my post at https://www.cloudyni...mers/?p=5184287 useful, xxjedixknightxx.


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#7 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 03 August 2020 - 07:59 PM

Here are links to the free planetarium apps SkyPortal, Star Chart, and Star Walk.

 

https://www.celestro...rtal-mobile-app

 

https://itunes.apple...d345542655?mt=8

 

https://itunes.apple...app/id295430577

 

Celestron's SkyPortal is essentially the same as the basic version of Sky Safari.


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#8 rhetfield

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 10:07 AM

Important thing to remember is that scope aperture in your case will limit you to somewhere between 70-100x magnification on most objects, though the moon and Venus might look OK up to 150x.


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#9 KTAZ

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 10:16 AM

Important thing to remember is that scope aperture in your case will limit you to somewhere between 70-100x magnification on most objects, though the moon and Venus might look OK up to 150x.

And just to clarify, the rule of thumb here is about 50x per inch of aperture. So, 2.75x50 = 137.5x maximum. The 9mm will give you about 77x, so adding a 2x barlow will exceed your reasonable maximum.

 

Most importantly, you have a very entry level scope there. Most folks that are new fall into a trap and think, "I need more power to see better". Wrong. Adding power will magnify distortions such as seeing quality issues. Since the planets are currently low, those distortions are causing havoc for a lot of us, even with expensive telescopes.

 

The moon is a great object and using a lunar map with your kids is great. You can identify craters and plains then find them through your scope. Double stars are also good targets.


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#10 xxjedixknightxx

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 10:21 AM

Thanks guys for all the info.



#11 FreddieB

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 07:28 PM

The Orion Nebula is one of my favorite targets for viewing and it’s not difficult to find when the constellation Orion is visible. Orion is more prominent during winter, but I think he will be making some appearances before daylight during late summer. Kids are fascinated by viewing it, at least that’s been my experience. All the best to you and yours...

Fred

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#12 PPPPPP42

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 09:00 PM

Agreeing with various statements above.

 

70mm F10 is definitely not the ideal to gather enough light for most of the geeky DSO (deep sky object) stuff up there to look cool and its not capable of a ton of magnification but its good for the moon and you should be able to pull off the planets to at least a recognizable level.

 

On a good night you should be able to see the rings of Saturn though I'm not sure about any detail and I think you could probably make out the major stripe bands and 4 main moons of Jupiter.

 

Keep in mind seeing (sky stability and quality) often sucks and as was said the planets are often low enough in the sky that you are looking through a ton of atmosphere sideways and they just will be blurry balls of light.

Certain times of year and actually in a few years they will be higher up.

I find a lot of the time if I look at a jet stream map online and the fast colored part is over where i am then seeing will suck.  If I have nice straight even lines going across without the colored fast part then seeing might be better.  Several days of stable weather help.

 

Download skysafari (free) to your smart phone and use it to find stuff. click "search" from the bottom icon menu and then "tonight's best" and it will feed you a list of the cool stuff and when it rises and sets that night.  I adjusted mine in "actions and settings" (top of tonight's best menu) so that its sorted by altitude since the stuff highest in the sky is the clearest.  There are certain clusters that are typically always overhead somewhere that you might be able to see that look like white sparkle fireworks (on the better ones) though they will probably be somewhat dim in that small a scope.

Not sure how the suggested Orion nebula will look, its great in an 8" scope with reasonably dark skies but I have no idea for you.  Its also in a winter constellation and up during the day right now (something skysafari shows easily when you bump the time ahead).

 

Dark skies and dark adjusted eyes really matter for DSO's.

Also if the moon is up, then you are pretty much looking at the moon, almost everything else will be heavily washed out by the light.


Edited by PPPPPP42, 04 August 2020 - 09:01 PM.


#13 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 11:57 PM

Download skysafari (free) to your smart phone and use it to find stuff.

The basic version of Sky Safari costs $2.99.

https://apps.apple.c...ri/id1257281849

 

https://skysafariast...ri_android.html



#14 sg6

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Posted 05 August 2020 - 03:07 AM

70mm f/10 will do fine, my main scope is a 70mm f/5.

In general the supplied eyepiece are poor expect to want more/better. At f/10 reasonable plossls should work but eye relief reduces with eyepiece focal length.

 

Targets:

Jupiter, although low try around 50x to 70x, so a 12mm or 10mm eyepiece.

Saturn, again low, smaller, needs 100x to 120x, so 5mm, 6mm, 7mm eyepiece area. Magnification maybe hard to get.

Moon, actually much complained of by always a good default.

 

Next, get out and learn a few constellations and a few things in them. Targets are specified by constellation.

 

M13, Globular cluster in Hercules. Halfway up one side of the square, can be seen in binoculars.

M92, Globular cluster in Hercules. Difficult as it is somewhat away from the constellation stars. Have fun finding.

Albireo, color contrast double at the end of Cygnus. Follow all the way down from Deneb and the cross bit.

 

M33, Galaxy, should be viewable, 1 degree size so with a plossl you would need say 40x which is say a 20mm eyepiece. Your 20mm may do it.

M31, horrible to say forget it, reason is it is too big to fit all in at once. M31 is 3 degrees, that means 15x and that means a 46mm 50 degree plossl and they do not exist. Use binoculars, maybe use the scope to demonstrate the problem.

 

Double Cluster in Perseus, actually half way between Cassiopeia and Perseus. 1 degree so again a 20mm eyepiece, or binoculars for fun.

 

Find Auriga, 3 open clusters there. 2 inside Auriga and one just outside. Not sure one should be called a cluster, bit poor/pathetic.

 

Double double in Lyra. Pair of stars that are each a double. Think you need around 40x to split so say 50x and that makes around a 15mm eyepiece (46x).

 

So find: Hercules, Cygnus, Auriga, Lyra, Perseus, Cassiopeia.

And have fun buying lots and lots of eyepieces. biggrin.pngbiggrin.png

 

No worries about the 70mm, one has done me fine for 20 years.

You could go mad and buy a front solar film filter, ND5 is the specification for visual, and have a look at the sun. BUT finding the sun is not easy as aiming the scope at it can prove "difficult".

Little on the sun at present but it is another option, and can be done in the day and in the warm sunlight.




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