Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Color filters on Saturn and Jupiter

  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#1 Frisky

Frisky

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 648
  • Joined: 08 Feb 2019
  • Loc: Austin, Minnesota

Posted 04 August 2020 - 02:24 AM

Tonight, I viewed Saturn and Jupiter and tried a few color filters. In the past, I was less than impressed. I tried a Meade light yellow #8, light blue #82A and a ND96 moon filter. I have just a few comments. On Jupiter, the light blue had a barely noticeable tint, but I could make it out. The light yellow didn't show much of a tint on either planet. The light yellow might have shown the rings of Saturn a tiny bit better, and the light blue showed a speck more contrast on Saturn's orb. Neither did much on Jupiter. The surprise was the 87% blocking moon filter on Jupiter. It cut a lot of glare and gave me the best view of the night! I hadn't tried it on Jupiter, as I thought it would block too much light. Overall, I still prefer the unfiltered view.

 

Joe



#2 Traveler

Traveler

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,553
  • Joined: 19 Aug 2007
  • Loc: The Netherlands

Posted 04 August 2020 - 02:32 AM

Maybe a #12 (yellow) can help you a little more. On Jupiter, there are nights my Baader Neodymium filter shows some details more pronounced.  


  • Sarkikos, Ohmless, zohsix and 1 other like this

#3 Frisky

Frisky

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 648
  • Joined: 08 Feb 2019
  • Loc: Austin, Minnesota

Posted 04 August 2020 - 02:47 AM

Yes, I was thinking of trying a #12, but it would have a noticeable tint. Probably not bad though.

 

Joe



#4 zohsix

zohsix

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 266
  • Joined: 24 Aug 2017
  • Loc: SE Michigan

Posted 04 August 2020 - 04:51 AM

Plus one on the Baader Neodymium filter.


  • Sarkikos and Frisky like this

#5 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,124
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 04 August 2020 - 08:00 AM

One filter I enjoy using on Jupiter is the Astronomik B-band deep sky imaging filter.  Jupiter’s disk takes on a Neptune-like color with that filter. The green filter from the set does a nice job as well.  It is an expensive set of filters but I use it enough for visual to justify the expense.  
 

The b-band filter also can be used for contrast enhancement of nebula at smaller exit pupils.

 

Another interesting thing you can try is stacking your #8 and #82a filters.  Sometimes that combination gives an extra pop to fine details.


  • Frisky likes this

#6 Dave McCrary

Dave McCrary

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 27
  • Joined: 04 Jun 2017
  • Loc: Gladstone, Oregon

Posted 04 August 2020 - 09:16 AM

Check out "PLANETARY FILTER SHOOTOUT" . It is in "EYEPIECES" on the second page. A lot of good information.

Dave 


  • BFaucett, Frisky, sunnyday and 1 other like this

#7 vdog

vdog

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,816
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2018
  • Loc: California Central Valley, U.S.A.

Posted 04 August 2020 - 12:00 PM

I'll occasionally use a light blue on Jupiter and Saturn; it does enhance the banding a bit.  However, more often I use the Baader Neodymium for Jupiter and nothing for Saturn.

 

I agree that an ND can help with Jupiter, although I use a gentler single polarizer stacked with the Baader.


  • Frisky likes this

#8 BFaucett

BFaucett

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,812
  • Joined: 12 Jul 2014
  • Loc: Houston, Texas

Posted 04 August 2020 - 12:08 PM

Check out "PLANETARY FILTER SHOOTOUT" . It is in "EYEPIECES" on the second page. A lot of good information.

Dave 

 

Here's the link to the thread:

https://www.cloudyni...ilter-shootout/

 

Bob F. smile.gif


  • Frisky likes this

#9 GeneT

GeneT

    Ely Kid

  • *****
  • Posts: 15,781
  • Joined: 07 Nov 2008
  • Loc: South Texas

Posted 04 August 2020 - 01:18 PM

OK--I am going to be a lone voice with the majority of people who use planetary filters. I quite using them several years ago. I had 10 or 12 of the top quality planetary eyepiece filters. I used them for several years. When various planets were up for viewing such as Mars, Jupiter and Saturn, I tried various combinations with the goal to squeeze out additional planetary detail. I did several A B comparisons among the filters and with or without any filter. After several years of this, I concluded that I could see as much planetary detail without a filter as with one. I should include here that I owned top quality eyepieces, and the optics on my 12.5 inch Portaball were excellent. So, I sold off my planetary filters. However, my anti filter sentiments are in regards to planetary filters only. Filters for deep sky objects are another matter. I recommend a good H-beta, OIII and possibly a high contrast filter. There are numerous deep sky objects that are popped up with a good filter. 


  • Sarkikos, russell23, Nippon and 3 others like this

#10 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,124
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 04 August 2020 - 02:13 PM

OK--I am going to be a lone voice with the majority of people who use planetary filters. I quite using them several years ago. I had 10 or 12 of the top quality planetary eyepiece filters. I used them for several years. When various planets were up for viewing such as Mars, Jupiter and Saturn, I tried various combinations with the goal to squeeze out additional planetary detail. I did several A B comparisons among the filters and with or without any filter. After several years of this, I concluded that I could see as much planetary detail without a filter as with one. I should include here that I owned top quality eyepieces, and the optics on my 12.5 inch Portaball were excellent. So, I sold off my planetary filters. However, my anti filter sentiments are in regards to planetary filters only. Filters for deep sky objects are another matter. I recommend a good H-beta, OIII and possibly a high contrast filter. There are numerous deep sky objects that are popped up with a good filter. 

Pretty much agree.  The green/blue filters can do a little for Jupiter.   I mainly use the filters though to just change things up.  That blue imaging filter is really cool because it gives Jupiter’s disk a Neptune like color.  

 

Where filters have the most benefit is to offset some of the problems created by CA with an achromat and for the Moon.  In particular the #21 Orange is great on the Moon.  But a #85 salmon works similar to the orange with much closer to neutral color.  A lot of the color filters have interesting effects on the Moon with the side benefit that if you don’t like the lunar brightness they cut it down.  


  • Ohmless and Frisky like this

#11 vdog

vdog

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,816
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2018
  • Loc: California Central Valley, U.S.A.

Posted 04 August 2020 - 03:28 PM

I can see why some people prefer no planetary filters at all.  The difference they make is pretty subtle.   Good optics, seeing, etc. all make way more of a difference.  I sold most of my color filters and the two I have left I use only rarely, mostly when the seeing is bad but I'm still looking at planets for some reason. grin.gif

 

I stand by the use of ND and polarizer filters though.  Planets can be pretty bright, enough to wash out detail and produce diffraction artifacts in my reflectors, even at magnifications above 300x.


Edited by vdog, 04 August 2020 - 03:28 PM.

  • jeffmac, csphere.d and Frisky like this

#12 barbie

barbie

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,300
  • Joined: 28 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Northeast Ohio

Posted 04 August 2020 - 05:54 PM

Of all the filters I've used on Mars, Jupiter and Saturn, I've found orange and light yellow to work the best for my observing situation.


  • BFaucett and Frisky like this

#13 GeneT

GeneT

    Ely Kid

  • *****
  • Posts: 15,781
  • Joined: 07 Nov 2008
  • Loc: South Texas

Posted 04 August 2020 - 11:32 PM

I can see why some people prefer no planetary filters at all.  The difference they make is pretty subtle.   Good optics, seeing, etc. all make way more of a difference.  I sold most of my color filters and the two I have left I use only rarely, mostly when the seeing is bad but I'm still looking at planets for some reason. grin.gif I stand by the use of ND and polarizer filters though.  Planets can be pretty bright, enough to wash out detail and produce diffraction artifacts in my reflectors, even at magnifications above 300x.

I forgot to mention that I most often use neutral density and polarizing filters on the moon. Between half and full, the moon is just too bright. In fact, I am prone to migraines, and for some reason if I do not use a filter on the moon, I get headachy. 


  • epee, BFaucett, vdog and 2 others like this

#14 Frisky

Frisky

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 648
  • Joined: 08 Feb 2019
  • Loc: Austin, Minnesota

Posted 05 August 2020 - 02:21 AM

Russell- I did stack the #8 and 82A. They came close to winning best view!


  • russell23 and Ohmless like this

#15 Rutilus

Rutilus

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,701
  • Joined: 17 Dec 2010

Posted 05 August 2020 - 05:07 AM

Maybe a #12 (yellow) can help you a little more. On Jupiter, there are nights my Baader Neodymium filter shows some details more pronounced.  

My #12 yellow filter tends to live full time with my 150mm f/8 achromat. With my scope it tends to show detail

easier. Here are three drawings made over the years with the scope and filter. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Planets-cn.jpg

  • BillP, epee, eros312 and 6 others like this

#16 Starman1

Starman1

    Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 47,417
  • Joined: 23 Jun 2003
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 05 August 2020 - 11:30 AM

Look at this:

http://karmalimbo.co...im Thompson.pdf

See especially page 12 on for the most exhaustive color filter recommendations for planets I've ever seen.

Don


  • BFaucett and Frisky like this

#17 Frisky

Frisky

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 648
  • Joined: 08 Feb 2019
  • Loc: Austin, Minnesota

Posted 05 August 2020 - 11:50 AM

Wow! I just downloaded the paper. Looks comprehensive.

 

Joe



#18 Nippon

Nippon

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,703
  • Joined: 22 Oct 2009
  • Loc: Central Florida

Posted 05 August 2020 - 02:58 PM

I have found that colored planet filters do more harm than good in apertures under six inches. They all block light so in small apertures you can't afford to lose any light.


  • Frisky likes this

#19 jeffmac

jeffmac

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 996
  • Joined: 01 Aug 2014
  • Loc: Triad area, NC

Posted 05 August 2020 - 07:56 PM

I find that filters are particularly useful on Mars, to reduce irradiation. They can also help when the seeing is bad. The image "appears" to settle down. I generally don't use them on Jupiter or Saturn.
  • Frisky likes this

#20 Traveler

Traveler

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,553
  • Joined: 19 Aug 2007
  • Loc: The Netherlands

Posted 06 August 2020 - 10:29 AM

On Mars: #23A sometimes helps me.



#21 Starman1

Starman1

    Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 47,417
  • Joined: 23 Jun 2003
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 06 August 2020 - 10:51 AM

On Mars: #23A sometimes helps me.

If the Baader Contrast Booster isn't affordable, the #23A red-orange filter is one of the best inexpensive options for Mars.



#22 Frisky

Frisky

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 648
  • Joined: 08 Feb 2019
  • Loc: Austin, Minnesota

Posted 06 August 2020 - 12:18 PM

According to the paper linked to above, it looks like my two color filters aren't that great, lol!

 

Joe



#23 astro744

astro744

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 773
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2007

Posted 06 August 2020 - 01:02 PM

Filters are tools used to tease out low contrast details on planets.  The colour chosen for a particular feature needs to give the greatest contrast for that feature.  E.g. a blue filter will make anything red appear darker.

 

Off course filters change the colour of the entire view which may or may not be aesthetically pleasing but their function is to improve contrast on different coloured features.  An experience planetary observer will have a broad selection of coloured filters in their tool kit.  Note some filters have a similar colour but greater transmission and these can be used for smaller ‘scopes. I.e. the colour is lighter.

 

For a comprehensive discussion on the use of filters for planetary observing see,

 

http://alpo-astronom...es/FILTERS1.HTM



#24 Starman1

Starman1

    Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 47,417
  • Joined: 23 Jun 2003
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 06 August 2020 - 01:31 PM

According to the paper linked to above, it looks like my two color filters aren't that great, lol!

 

Joe

Regarding the report's "Mars" filters:

Complex filters like the Baader Moon & Sky Glow or Contrast Booster or the various multi-coating "Mars" filters aren't listed.

Neither is, I notice, the #80A, which has been reported to show limb clouds and ice caps well.

Some people have reported a "violet clearing" of Mars' atmosphere in which a #47 violet filter returns some details.

And many people who have used the rare #30 magenta filter have reported good results.

And none of those is listed.

So take the list with a grain of salt, because it is unlikely to be definitive.

 

"Observing and Photographing the Solar System" by Dobbins, Parker, and Capen mentions the following filters for Mars:

#21, #23A, #8, #12, #15, #38A, #64, #47, #58, #25, #29

That book is from 1988.  I wonder what they'd think of today's multi-layer filters.


Edited by Starman1, 06 August 2020 - 01:32 PM.

  • Frisky likes this

#25 Frisky

Frisky

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 648
  • Joined: 08 Feb 2019
  • Loc: Austin, Minnesota

Posted 20 August 2020 - 01:43 AM

Tonight, I went back out and compared the light yellow #8 and light blue #82A, separately and combined, on Saturn and Jupiter. In the end, I came to the conclusion the best view, for me and from my scope, was the unfiltered view.

 

Joe




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics