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Lumincon Deep Sky as a compliment to UHC Gen 3?

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#1 BlueMoon

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 10:44 AM

Howdy folks. As usual, reading everything I can but value the experiences of others here.

I've been pondering a 1.25 " Lumicon Deep Sky as a compliment to the their UHC Gen3 I already have. My goal is better contrast for galaxies. A filter with a wider broadband pass in visible light to compliment the UHC narrow pass bands for nebulae.

I live in a Bortle 3 community with a Bortle 2 less than an hour away.

Two popular resolutions I see frequently:

A "gasoline filter", just drive out to the darker site. However, that's not always feasible.

Bump up the magnification a bit to darken the background sky. Currently I use Delites with a 62 aFoV so while bumping the mag up a bit works, it decreases the aFoV somewhat.

Both Lumicons do light pollution and sky glow control so there's a bit of duplication there.

Suggestions, opinions or ???.

 

Cheers and thanks.


Edited by BlueMoon, 04 August 2020 - 10:55 AM.


#2 Starman1

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 11:55 AM

Depends on your light pollution, but after extensive use of broadband filters, I found them to be most effective in already-dark skies.

They tune up the contrast a very little bit, which works best when all you need is a tiny little bit.

 

I kept the Baader UHC-S because it slightly outperformed the Lumicon Deep Sky.

 

But for a very gentle cut without affecting the stars by much, try a DGM GCE. 

That filter is very gentle, doesn't cut the violet or blue and has unrestrained red transmission into the IR.

If your use is to be for galaxies (and I think you will find very little help in that regard), the GCE would dim the galaxy less than

most broadband or CLS filters.  And it can be used at fairly high magnifications, like 15x/inch.

By the way, GCE stands for Galaxy Contrast Enhancement.  It's an optimistic name.grin.gif


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#3 dcollier

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 12:01 PM

The Baader Moon and Skyglow filter works better for Galaxies from Light Polluted skies.   But do not expect miracles from it.

 

           -Dave


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#4 BlueMoon

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 12:48 PM

 

But for a very gentle cut without affecting the stars by much, try a DGM GCE.

Thanks for the suggestions guys. I'll look into the DGM for now. Light pollution here is pretty low with very few mercury or sodium lamps nearby and not much scatter. I think a gentle cut for observing "in town" when I can't travel to my darker site would be fine.

 

Cheers.


Edited by BlueMoon, 04 August 2020 - 12:50 PM.


#5 vdog

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 03:32 PM

Bump up the magnification a bit to darken the background sky.

waytogo.gif  This works, especially for those AV galaxies just at the edge of visibility. 

 

It doesn't take a huge jump, either, so you shouldn't lose that much FOV.  Usually going from about 100 to 150x does it for me.

 

 


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#6 vdog

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 03:33 PM

The Baader Moon and Skyglow filter works better for Galaxies from Light Polluted skies.   But do not expect miracles from it.

Really?  I'll definitely have to try that next time.   Thanks for the tip.

 



#7 turtle86

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Posted 04 August 2020 - 07:41 PM

Depends on your light pollution, but after extensive use of broadband filters, I found them to be most effective in already-dark skies.

They tune up the contrast a very little bit, which works best when all you need is a tiny little bit.

 

I kept the Baader UHC-S because it slightly outperformed the Lumicon Deep Sky.

 

But for a very gentle cut without affecting the stars by much, try a DGM GCE. 

That filter is very gentle, doesn't cut the violet or blue and has unrestrained red transmission into the IR.

If your use is to be for galaxies (and I think you will find very little help in that regard), the GCE would dim the galaxy less than

most broadband or CLS filters.  And it can be used at fairly high magnifications, like 15x/inch.

By the way, GCE stands for Galaxy Contrast Enhancement.  It's an optimistic name.grin.gif

 

A dark sky will always be the best filter for a galaxy...


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