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In a cul-de-sac of Ophiuchus

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#1 VanJan

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Posted 05 August 2020 - 11:18 PM

To the east and a little north of 70 Oph is a rectangular inclusion of the Ophiuchus border into the area of Serpens. Within this constellation cul-de-sac are two targets of the Struve family - one easy and one not so much, but both successfully resolved with my 90mm refractor.

 

STTA 170 - 18h 30.7m +04d 31'    6.97, 8.75   100"   5d PA   (2015)   A2   White, purple.   36X

 

STF 2322 - 18h 30.1m +04d 04'    6.67, 11.28   19.8"   172d PA   (2009)   B2V

                                                                12.79   67.2"   295d PA   (2015)

                                                       White, no color, no color. C star only seen with averted vision. Visually, both the B and C components seem one magnitude brighter than their measured values.

                                                       

 

Also in the immediate neighborhood are several variables, most notably of which is the carbon star TY Oph. (Hi Aubrey wavey.gif)  Using an AAVSO chart, I estimated its magnitude at 10.1 and judged its color as decidedly pink. 36X  Might take a bit more aperture to enhance the color to the typical red of carbon stars.

 

All in all, a diverting, quiet little "block on the border" before the sky turns snakey. scared.gif


Edited by VanJan, 05 August 2020 - 11:28 PM.

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#2 The Ardent

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Posted 05 August 2020 - 11:41 PM

I believe Struve observed these before official constellation boundaries. Kinda OT, but I love the stars that are in the wrong constellation, like 10 UMa

https://en.m.wikiped...0_Ursae_Majoris
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#3 clusterbuster

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 01:06 AM

Will put this on my list,

Thx.

 Mark


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#4 flt158

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 08:02 AM

Great report, Van Jan. 

By the way, I have committed myself to making a full list of carbon stars down to 13.0 magnitude which can be observed from Ireland. 

Yes. I know I'm a bit mad! lol.gif

Beggarly got me started when he sent me an Excel Spreadsheet a few months ago using Simbad. 

So I'm working through them star by star. 

They are all in order of Right Ascension. 

I delete all the carbon stars which are below my horizon of course.  

I also delete non carbon stars and quite a number of these are also included. 

Ones whose spectral classes are G, K, M or S.  

It's ironic that they are included - but there we are.  

You see, Simbad is not 100% reliable. 

But it appears www.aavso.org is. 

VizieR is too. 

Of course there are carbon stars which are NOT variable. 

These are not on the AAVSO website. 

So I have to got through them too. 

I believe most carbon stars are distinctly orange. 

Some have a red tint. 

And some, as Van Jan suggests, have a pinkish colour. 

Good man, Jan! waytogo.gif

 

And I have only gotten through the 1st 240. 

I suspect it will be 2021 before I complete the arduous job.

I insist on only going through 10 per day.

I then check out their positions using my Guide 9.1 DVD.   

At the moment TY Ophuichi is number 1996 on the Excel Spreadsheet.

Therefore there are probably about 2000 carbons which can be observed from 53 degrees north.   

 

By the way, I still have no idea as to when my Irish skies are going to clear up.

So if it is a cloudy night, I wade through these carbon stars for about half an hour. 

 

Best regards from Aubrey. 


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#5 nerich

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 09:09 AM

To the east and a little north of 70 Oph is a rectangular inclusion of the Ophiuchus border into the area of Serpens. Within this constellation cul-de-sac are two targets of the Struve family - one easy and one not so much, but both successfully resolved with my 90mm refractor.

 

STTA 170 - 18h 30.7m +04d 31'    6.97, 8.75   100"   5d PA   (2015)   A2   White, purple.   36X

 

STF 2322 - 18h 30.1m +04d 04'    6.67, 11.28   19.8"   172d PA   (2009)   B2V

                                                                12.79   67.2"   295d PA   (2015)

                                                       White, no color, no color. C star only seen with averted vision. Visually, both the B and C components seem one magnitude brighter than their measured values.

                                                       

 

Also in the immediate neighborhood are several variables, most notably of which is the carbon star TY Oph. (Hi Aubrey wavey.gif)  Using an AAVSO chart, I estimated its magnitude at 10.1 and judged its color as decidedly pink. 36X  Might take a bit more aperture to enhance the color to the typical red of carbon stars.

 

All in all, a diverting, quiet little "block on the border" before the sky turns snakey. scared.gif

 

I love your sense of context and location. Just a few stars, but what a rich report!

 

I believe Struve observed these before official constellation boundaries. Kinda OT, but I love the stars that are in the wrong constellation, like 10 UMa

https://en.m.wikiped...0_Ursae_Majoris

 

Or 23 Her, which is in Corona Borealis according to all my atlases. 


Edited by nerich, 06 August 2020 - 09:10 AM.

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#6 VanJan

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 01:35 PM

 

I believe most carbon stars are distinctly orange. 

 

 

Huh. That's enlightening. I was under the mistaken impression that carbon stars were predominantly red. Thanks for educating me. bow.gif  And WOW what a project! Hats off to you! I must admit that I would wither and shrink like a daffodil in the desert in confronting such a challenge. faint.gif

 

Now to get this thread back into the confines of this forum. Do you know of any double stars wherein both components are carbon stars, even if their association is only of the common proper motion category question.gif    


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#7 Rich5567

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 01:40 PM

Nice description of the area, especially like the sky 'turning snakey'lol.gif.

 

This area is next on my list, when the clouds eventually disappear.

 

STF 2322 I've yet to view, but STF 2324 is on my target list. Next clear night is either going to be in Serpens Cauda and Ophiuchus, or back to Vulpecula and Sagitta, I've yet to decide.

 

I shall get around to viewing STTA 170 and STF 2322 at some point. I've not seen many purple stars in my time, so will have to check out STTA 170 for sure.

 

Great reportwaytogo.gif .

 

Rich.


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#8 VanJan

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 01:55 PM

I love your sense of context and location. Just a few stars, but what a rich report!

 

 

 

Thanks. bigblush.gif  By design. I need some sort of hook upon which to hang my observations to report them. I don't have the talent and dedication that you have for your literary and long reports. I'm more of a pub limerick bloke than Milton. lol.gif


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#9 VanJan

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 02:08 PM

 

 

I shall get around to viewing STTA 170 and STF 2322 at some point. I've not seen many purple stars in my time, so will have to check out STTA 170 for sure.

 

Great reportwaytogo.gif .

 

Rich.

 

Thanks, and I hope you are not disappointed. The purple may be due more to my limited aperture than any intrinsic properties of the star itself. But I am curious if other observers note the magnitude "discrepancies" I observed. Clear and steady skies to you! rockon.gif


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#10 flt158

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 05:47 PM

Quote: "Now to get this thread back into the confines of this forum. Do you know of any double stars wherein both components are carbon stars, even if their association is only of the common proper motion category question?"

 

I haven't come across any as yet, Van Jan. 

I have come across the odd carbon with an orange star nearby. 

But please don't ask me what its designation is. 

I've now sorted out 250 carbon star positions. 

 

We might have clear skies on Friday night 7th August. 

But I won't be surprised if the weather websites are wrong again. 

 

Best regards from Aubrey. 


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