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Canon 10X42IS L like perfect handheld astronomical bino?

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#1 paulsky

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 02:11 PM

Hello,

For many years I have used the Canon 12X36 IS II as a binocular for bird watching and general terrestrial views, as an astronomical binocular it has not convinced me for different reasons, one of them, perhaps the most important, is the sensation of "dark image" that It provides me, it has a 3mm pupil exit, I find it a dark binocular, the other reason is the sensation of when I observe through them is looking through a tube, I like the feeling of wide angle and this does not provide it ..but, and this is a big but, it is stabilized and this characteristic for me is very important, imagine you with 12X and my shaking hands ...
During the day I really like ..
I have been thinking about the Canon 10X42 IS L, since I have used the 18x50 IS model and I was not convinced for birding (artifacts ..) or at night (too heavy ..)
I would like to know your opinion about the 10X42 IS model and your experience as a binocular for night observation, feel and ergonomics in the hands, image quality: sharpness, contrast, luminosity, CA and astigmatism, wide field?
Mechanics: focus, eyepieces, eye relief for not wearing glasses ...

Very kind for your comments in advance.
Cheers,
Paul
 


Edited by paulsky, 06 August 2020 - 02:12 PM.


#2 drt3d

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 02:31 PM

I think you are going to love the 10x42. It is great for both birding and astronomy. 

 

I use mine every day and night.

 

PS. If you are in the USA, you can buy it from a place like B&H and if you are not thrilled, return it hassle free.

 

George


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#3 Huan

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 04:26 PM

Hi Paul,

 

I love every aspect of 10x42 IS except its weight. I don't have a 18x50 IS but according to Canon 10x42 weights 2.4 lb / 1100 g and 18x50 weights 2.6 lb / 1180 g.

 

I don't think the difference is noticeable unless one holds both at the same time and compare deliberately.

 

Usually I can hold 10x42 for 5 minutes in the beginning, then 3 minutes or even less later on. I love everything else about 10x42 and I would say it's a perfect handheld astronomical bino.

Two months ago I saw the new 10x32 IS was selling at discount of $580 on Amazon so I got one which is considerably lighter at 27.5 oz / 780 g. It shows more CA during the day; the sky appears less dark than in 10x42 IS, but I do like how light it is. I was considering Zeiss 8x42 SF which is also 780 g but decided that I can never go back to none IS whenever I think about how stars look like when IS turns off. 

 

Sometimes 10x42 does show marginally more stars than 10x32 but as soon as I switch back to 10x32 and "make a little bit more effort" on the areas where the stars were I could see them in 10x32 also. Both binos show basically same FOV and same amount of stars. Now I use 10x32 more often, but whenever I find something interesting I would switch to 10x42. The sky is just darker and stars are brighter in 10x42. 

 

Both of them are jewels. Under no circumstances will I ever be parted with any of them.


Edited by Huan, 06 August 2020 - 04:29 PM.

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#4 cuzimthedad

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 05:18 PM

Here is a review I wrote on mine just a little over a week ago. I think you are really gonna like yours.


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#5 jprideaux

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 04:53 AM

I love my Canon 10x42 IS L. After using hand-held IS, I can never go back to hand-held non-IS. I like that they are better quality glass and also waterproof. I use mine for both day and night (probably more for day). I even sometimes go kayaking in salt-water creeks with them around my neck to look at shore birds from the water. I’ve never taken a splash with them, but the fact that they are waterproof alows me to use them in ways I would never use non-water-proof optics.

They are a joy to use for astronomical use with seeing steady stars. When I turn the IS off, the stars are bouncing all around. With the IS on, the stars become rock steady. The non-IS binoculars that I use for astronomy are all used with tripods.

As said above, the only negative (besides the initial cost) is that they are heavy. A nice pair of roof-prism non-IS binoculars will be much lighter. So you pay two “prices” for the IS. It is an individual decision whether they are right for you.
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#6 Alan French

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 07:22 AM

I am a fan of most of the Canon IS line, with the exception of the 10x42L. The optics are superb, but I find the ergonomics just awful. The shape is awkward, it's heavy, and it is not a good fit in my hands. 

 

A friend had a pair at Winter Star Party long ago, so I got to give them a good try. I also revisited them at NEAF in 2019.

 

They would be far more agreeable if redone in the same basic shape as the newer 10, 12, and 14x32s, IMHO, even without some weight loss.

 

It's tough to find shops where you can check out binoculars unless you live in a major city, in general. I recommend buying from a place with a good return policy. You may well love them, but there's no guarantee. 

 

Clear skies, Alan


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#7 Windowspy

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 08:14 AM

I had used the newer12x32 for a few weeks to look at stars. I felt that their stabilization was amazing, especially compared to the older 10x30 IS II. The newer x32 line has 2 stabilization modes: one similar to what’s in all of the other stablized canon Bono’s, and a new mode intended for watching stationary objects. I swear the new mode was just amazing rod star gazing.

I eventually swapped them for the 15x50’s which are a lot brighter... but they do shake more than the 12x32’s.
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#8 ArsMachina

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 08:16 AM

I sold the 10x42 again and kept the 15x50

The weight difference is really small but 15x against 10x makes a big difference

 

Jochen


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#9 Alan French

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 08:17 AM

I had used the newer12x32 for a few weeks to look at stars. I felt that their stabilization was amazing, especially compared to the older 10x30 IS II. The newer x32 line has 2 stabilization modes: one similar to what’s in all of the other stablized canon Bono’s, and a new mode intended for watching stationary objects. I swear the new mode was just amazing rod star gazing.

I eventually swapped them for the 15x50’s which are a lot brighter... but they do shake more than the 12x32’s.

The stabilization on the new 12x32 IS was an improvement over my 12x36 IS IIs. Let's hope they upgrade some of the older models, especially the 15 and 18x50 with the new IS. 

 

Clear skies, Alan 


Edited by Alan French, 07 August 2020 - 08:24 AM.

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#10 Huan

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 11:54 AM

I had used the newer12x32 for a few weeks to look at stars. I felt that their stabilization was amazing, especially compared to the older 10x30 IS II. The newer x32 line has 2 stabilization modes: one similar to what’s in all of the other stablized canon Bono’s, and a new mode intended for watching stationary objects. I swear the new mode was just amazing rod star gazing.
 

I second this. I switched between two IS modes for several hundred times during my first camp this summer with my Canon 10x32 IS ( Yes, I clicked the buttons every 30 seconds nonstop for hours lol.gif ). The Powered IS mode does provide even steadier view than normal IS mode when you focus on one area without moving. The normal IS is superior for panning around.


Edited by Huan, 07 August 2020 - 01:04 PM.

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