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Jupiter and Mars from an all nighter!

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#1 dhammy

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 07:20 PM

Was out walking the dogs yesterday evening and the sky was looking clear from clouds but hazy. It had been a while since I'd been able to get out and so I made up my mind to give it a shot without having high hopes. Well, turns out transparency wasn't great but the seeing was. Really glad I didn't let the haziness put me off. At my normal capture settings Jupiter is typically at a histogram level of 60-65 but it was down to 47%, but I know people image in the range of 40-60 so I just left it be. 

 

I decided to begin imaging Mars at 3 am so I had a bit of a break (which I spent running the Jupiter data to see what I had gotten)... I should have taken a nap but you know curiosity lol.gif  Then 3 am to about 4:30 am was spent on Mars before finally packing up and heading to bed. 

 

These were the results after processing today - definitely glad I didn't let the haziness put me off as I did want to capture the Oval BA approaching the GRS! Was pleased that some of the finer detail was coming through. 

 

Jupiter-2020-08-06-0301_8UT.jpg

 

Jupiter-2020-08-06-0346_0.jpg

 

Then this was a 5 minute capture of Mars. I looked at some of the derotated images but honestly, this single capture seemed to be that bit sharper. Happy with the detail that was coming through on this one too and the tiny part of the south pole visible. 

 

Mars-2020-08-06-0826_3.jpg


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#2 Sunspot

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 07:43 PM

I have found that hazy skies usually produce steady seeing, maybe the temperature gradient is minimal or something. I had that a few nights ago. You got some great images.


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#3 Kokatha man

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 07:48 PM

Well worth the effort David! waytogo.gif waytogo.gif waytogo.gif That SPC has really shrunk! Looks like you're enjoying the kind of elevation we had for the 2018 Mars apparition now! :)


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#4 gene 4181

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 08:12 PM

     WOW  , nice work 


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#5 sunnyday

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 08:37 PM

superb takes , nice details , thanks .


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#6 Kiwi Paul

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 09:40 PM

Haziness in the boundary layer of the atmosphere indicates an inversion of temperature at somewhere around the 2 to 4000 ft level. This occurs under a ridge of high pressure or more generally under a High. At times of lower pressure or under the influence of a Low there is usually no low level inversion present and the boundary layer air is mixed through a deeper layer. An obvious clue of this is showery weather.
Cheers Paul
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#7 Kiwi Paul

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 09:41 PM

Am surprised how quickly the polar cap has shrunk.
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#8 KiwiRay

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 09:56 PM

Am surprised how quickly the polar cap has shrunk.

It's asymmetric.  It is shrinking quickly, but most of it is out of view from this side of Mars. 


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#9 JupiterOwl

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 10:02 PM

That SPC has really shrunk!

Excuse my ignorance. What is an SPC?


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#10 KiwiRay

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 10:12 PM

Excuse my ignorance. What is an SPC?

South Polar Cap.


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#11 Az Frank

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 10:44 PM

Captured nicely David. Well done.


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#12 DMach

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 06:37 AM

Amazing work David!
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#13 Foc

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 07:31 AM

Great images, despite the cloud you have processed them so well that Jupiter, particularly in that first image,is sparking with life!

I like your Mars just as much, it has the fine detail emerging in a very natural way and as really interesting to see such shrinkage in the pole on this side.


Edited by Foc, 07 August 2020 - 07:31 AM.

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#14 dhammy

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 10:18 AM

Thanks all for the likes and comments! I'm just about recovered from the lack of sleep lol.gif  

 

Yeah it's interesting how haziness seems to give steadier imaging conditions in some cases. Since I set up each night and take it down again, I can find lots of convenient excuses to avoid all the work if I think there's a high possibility of not getting worthwhile images haha. I'll remove haziness from that list now. Well worth getting the equipment out just in case because you could be missing out on a great night! 

 

 

The size of the SPC surprised me in the live feed too - I had expected it to be a little larger on this side! It'll be interesting to see if it disappears from this view of the planet soon. The elevation of Mars is fantastic and will hopefully bode well for some nice images around opposition! 




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