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Difference in Distances

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#1 Older Padawan

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 03:48 PM

I hope this is the right place for this question. I'm trying to understand the difference in the reported distance to Messier objects. Stellarium shows M27  as 861 Ly away but NASA shows it at 1227 Ly. I imagine I'm reading something wrong but I need a little help to understand. Thanks in advance for your assistance.



#2 Love Cowboy

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 03:50 PM

You may not be reading anything wrong, at least with M27. Planetary nebulae are notoriously hard to measure distance to.

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#3 Older Padawan

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 03:59 PM

You may not be reading anything wrong, at least with M27. Planetary nebulae are notoriously hard to measure distance to.

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Thanks Love Cowboy



#4 Organic Astrochemist

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 04:19 PM

Love Cowboy is correct about the difficulty of determining the distance to planetary nebulae, but the larger value is based on GAIA measurements and is likely the more accurate.
https://arxiv.org/pdf/2001.08266.pdf
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