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Can you anodize paint your mount?

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#1 moxican

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 04:04 PM

I have recently stripped my NEQ6 into small pieces, and now it is in reassembly state. I was thinking, since it is in parts now it would be a good idea to paint the body. I like the look of a nice cherry red anodized paint finish, but I don't know what the process of this kind of paint is.

Do I have to strip the mount's original white paint? What kind of primer do I have to use? Where do I get all the necessary material? (anodizing paint, primer, clear coat)


 

#2 B 26354

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 04:09 PM

"Anodizing" is an electrolytic process, not a type of paint.

 

https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Anodizing

 

grin.gif


 

#3 calypsob

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 05:05 PM

But yes, you can get a kit and anodize the mount yourself. I've never seen anyone do that before but sounds like a cool idea. 


 

#4 gregj888

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 05:25 PM

Per above, anodizing is not paint and can only be done on Aluminum.  I don't know the purity of Aluminum is needed but that would also be a question.

 

If you want to Pain the mount, then Appliance epoxy might be an option (from a spray can)  as would powder coating (DIY kits from Harbor Freight if you have a compressor, google for other colors) 

 

If you want to go the normal rattle-can paints, use a self etching primer first.

 

As always YMMV..    


 

#5 Michael Covington

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 05:56 PM

Appliance epoxy dries very tough, but takes a week to dry.   It is worth considering.


 

#6 gregj888

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 06:08 PM

Appliance epoxy dries very tough, but takes a week to dry.   It is worth considering.

And often longer to fully cure... but once cured it's pretty tough.


 

#7 MitchAlsup

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 07:18 PM

But yes, you can get a kit and anodize the mount yourself. I've never seen anyone do that before but sounds like a cool idea. 

The kit is mostly a gallon of sulfuric acid and some electrodes. Any one with access to a battery (2 batteries?) can anodize aluminum.

 

Anodization is a surface treatment that opens up trillions of microscopic pores in the surface of the aluminum. One can soft anodize by running only a few hours, or hard anodize but running long enough the surface is no longer electrically conductive.

 

After anodization, you cook the part in a die to put color into the pores where it is difficult to remove.


 

#8 Benach

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 01:29 AM

But yes, you can get a kit and anodize the mount yourself. I've never seen anyone do that before but sounds like a cool idea.

Not really. Many parts of an EQ6 are parts that are casted and not parts coming from extruded beams. Casted aluminium usually contains a relatively high amount of silicium to increase the viscosity. Silicium in the aluminium and anodizing is a nono because this will create very messy surfaces. Many professional anodizing companies simply refuse to anodize cast aluminium, also because it destroys the purity of the anodizing baths.

MitchAlsup: you are forgetting a few tiny things: an anodizing reaction is highly exothermic and the sulfuric acid should remain below, if I'm not mistaken, well below 50°C/122°F, apart from that a lot of hydrogen will come off. Hydrogen is explosive in all ratios with air. So a good fume system is also needed.

As a friend who is a chemistry teacher and ATM said, after doing it and seeing two large blocks of ice (used as a coolant) melt before his eyes: "I will never ever do this again at home. Way too hazardous."
 

#9 calypsob

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 01:45 AM

Not really. Many parts of an EQ6 are parts that are casted and not parts coming from extruded beams. Casted aluminium usually contains a relatively high amount of silicium to increase the viscosity. Silicium in the aluminium and anodizing is a nono because this will create very messy surfaces. Many professional anodizing companies simply refuse to anodize cast aluminium, also because it destroys the purity of the anodizing baths.

MitchAlsup: you are forgetting a few tiny things: an anodizing reaction is highly exothermic and the sulfuric acid should remain below, if I'm not mistaken, well below 50°C/122°F, apart from that a lot of hydrogen will come off. Hydrogen is explosive in all ratios with air. So a good fume system is also needed.

As a friend who is a chemistry teacher and ATM said, after doing it and seeing two large blocks of ice (used as a coolant) melt before his eyes: "I will never ever do this again at home. Way too hazardous."

Im not sure how to verify if the aluminum is cast or extruded but I was going to mention that the kits are so expensive it would be cheaper to pay someone to do it if you only intend to do the mount.  

I see what you are saying though about the silicone being in cast parts https://www.pfonline...aluminum-alloys


Edited by calypsob, 08 August 2020 - 01:49 AM.

 

#10 sg6

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 01:57 AM

Looked into this and asked some time ago, not sure if here.

Possible as a DIY project but not as simple as say electroplating. Which was what I had half hoped for. I was looking at having mirror cell plates cut then black anodising them.

You use the acid to cause what could easiest described as a bubble or foam effect on the Al surface, then you dye this surface, then I think (cannot recall) fix the color.

 

All becomes a bit long winded and you need to have a fair idea of the chemicals. Nothing fancy but understanding what you are playing with is more then a little useful.

 

What would you do about the present paint/finish that is on the NEQ6. Looking at my EQ5 and HEQ5 it will take some work to remove what is there. Blasting at least - it is not sand anymore but some fine grit.

 

You might need to know the quality of the Aluminium used.

 

Whatever it will not be a small half day job.


 

#11 Benach

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 02:03 AM

Im not sure how to verify if the aluminum is cast or extruded but I was going to mention that the kits are so expensive it would be cheaper to pay someone to do it if you only intend to do the mount.
I see what you are saying though about the silicone being in cast parts https://www.pfonline...aluminum-alloys

I happen to be a mechanical engineer. I can see that most parts are cast. You can see it from the relatively rough surface.
 

#12 macona

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 02:21 AM

If you want shiny red there are chrome like powder coats that you could use. You can get a cheap power coat gun and spray it and then bake the parts in an oven. It will probably work better than trying to anodize cast parts because you dont know what the alloy is and you may end up with something that looks real bad. 

 

I send out all my parts to anodize to a local company that does it for me. They have a true black anodize that is even black in the infrared, where normal black anodizing dyes are transparent to NIR. For that matter all anodizing dyes I have seen seem to be NIR transparent. 


 

#13 moxican

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 10:46 AM

Ok, so I see anodizing is a no go. I was hoping for something that is not this difficult to do.

 

What are my other options if I want this to be nice cherry red?

Powder coat was mentioned. Although I have never done that I'll look into it. Any kits online or where to buy this stuff?


 

#14 cuzimthedad

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 10:47 AM

After doing some research concerning "hobby" level anodizing on several other sites, it was always recommended to take items to a professional business to have the work done. Safer and cheaper. In the spirit of the CN TOS Section III Practicing Safe Astronomy, I am locking this thread.


 


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