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Celestron Nexstar 8SE vs Skip to the beginning of the images gallery Meade 6" ACF Telescope on LX85 GoTo Equatorial Mount

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#1 Phelanka7

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 06:35 PM

So I'm looking to get into astrophotography and I'm trying to decide between these two setups...

https://www.highpoin...-xoCELUQAvD_BwE

And https://www.adorama....dl-gbase-drones

So do I go with the better equatorial mount with the 6” tube and upgrade later to a bigger aperture or do I get the Celestron 8" with the inferior mount? I guess it comes down to whether or not the LX-85 Meade EM is something worth investing in, or if I should invest in a bigger tube and save my pennies for a really good equatorial mount in the future?

Thanks for any advice!

#2 JohnBear

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 06:47 PM

Welcome to CN ! 

 

This is the wrong topic for this forum. (A Moderator will be along to remind you soon).

To save some time just repost this in the Astrophotography / Beginning and Intermediate Imaging forum, and you will get some great advice there. 


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#3 barbarosa

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 07:38 PM

While we wait for the move-

 

The Nexstar SE mount is not and cannot be made to be a good imaging mount. You can use if for EAA/live imaging using software such as SharpCap that can stack successive short exposures and align the stars. 

 

I  have no opinion about the Meade mount. Someone will come by who knows more. But a CEM or CEM is the way to go for longer exposures (longer is >30s).

 

A camera really opens up the possibilities- you can get to magnitude 17 with the 8 or the 6. What you can notice is image scale, Jupiter will just be larger with the 8.

 

I had an 8SE and enjoyed it eventually moving to a CPC and then by a long route to a CEM mount, refractors and a RASA 8. Speaking of not an SCT, take a look at some RCs. a 6" RC ($360) and an LX85 ($800) could be a nice combination. I've seen some nice images made with a small RC.


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#4 Phelanka7

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 08:30 PM

Welcome to CN ! 

 

This is the wrong topic for this forum. (A Moderator will be along to remind you soon).

To save some time just repost this in the Astrophotography / Beginning and Intermediate Imaging forum, and you will get some great advice there. 

Ok thanks.  I'll post my question there.



#5 Phelanka7

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 08:33 PM

(I posted this in the Beginner's Forum already by mistake.  Reposting here.)

So I'm looking to get into astrophotography and I'm trying to decide between these two setups...
 

https://www.highpoin...-xoCELUQAvD_BwE

And https://www.adorama....dl-gbase-drones

So do I go with the better equatorial mount with the 6” tube and upgrade later to a bigger aperture or do I get the Celestron 8" with the inferior mount? I guess it comes down to whether or not the LX-85 Meade EM is something worth investing in, or if I should invest in a bigger tube and save my pennies for a really good equatorial mount in the future?

Or are both picks bad?  My budget for mount/scope is about $1700 or so.

Thanks for any advice!



#6 Stelios

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 08:43 PM

Both picks are bad, with the Celestron being by far the worse of the two(I prefer Celestron to Meade in almost everything, but the SE mount is a nonstarter for astrophotography. You need a German Equatorial). 

 

You also will find life much easier if starting with a better mount. I suggest the HEQ5-Pro or the slightly cheaper Orion Sirius. 

 

For a scope you could either opt to go with the bundled Sirius + ED80, or just get the Sirius (or the slightly better HEQ5-Pro for an extra $50) and add one of the Astrotech offerings (you also get a *small* discount as a CN member if buying from Astronomics). I limited the prices to your budget, but stay with the refractors as the reflectors will require additional expenditures. 

 

Note that practically any scope you get will also require a flattener (figure around $150). With scopes with focal length over 400mm you will also need to guide ($230). 


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#7 Stelios

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 08:46 PM

I should've added that you probably think the scopes I suggest don't have enough power. This doesn't matter in astrophotography. It is entirely unlike visual. The mount matters most--you need steady tracking, which is easier with lighter loads. Long exposures mitigate aperture advantages and in some cases reverse them. 

 

Also many targets don't fit in small FOV scopes like the ones in your original post. And SCT's require complex guiding via OAG for best performance. 


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#8 Phelanka7

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 09:02 PM

I should've added that you probably think the scopes I suggest don't have enough power. This doesn't matter in astrophotography. It is entirely unlike visual. The mount matters most--you need steady tracking, which is easier with lighter loads. Long exposures mitigate aperture advantages and in some cases reverse them. 

 

Also many targets don't fit in small FOV scopes like the ones in your original post. And SCT's require complex guiding via OAG for best performance. 

 

Awesome!  Thank you for your advice!  That Sirius scope looks interesting...   It looks like it gets very good reviews and does exactly what I'm looking for (Deep Sky imaging). Gonna do some more research, so I'll do some digging around here and see what I find. I'm very much a newbie so I got a lot of learning to do grin.gif  Last thing I want to do is make an uninformed purchase.  I sorta did that with my binoculars.  Lesson learned.



#9 cst4

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 09:13 PM

Yes, I agree with Stelios. Don’t get a big heavy long focal length SCT to start out with on AP. That’s for the pros who have been doing this for years. To learn the ropes a small refractor with focal length between about 300 and 800mm is what you want. Much more forgiving on tracking due to shorter focal length and lighter weight, no collimation to deal with, and not to mention with the wider views you can fit a lot more of the larger targets in the field of view. 


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#10 Jond105

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 09:57 PM

Moved topic to beginning imaging 




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