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I have a question about what I'm looking for

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#1 BillyBlast01

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 08:44 PM

Hey everyone, I have been out of and away from telescopes for about 12 years. I am going to get back into it and I have a question or two. I want to go with the Orion SkyView Pro 8" Equatorial Reflector Telescope and I will need a motor drive to be able to take pictures. Has anyone used this mount and if yes what motor drive do I need to do the job I am wanting to do. I will say I am a disabled Army Veteran so I don't have the money to buy everything at once I will be doing a little at a time. I was thinking about the Orion 4.5 but after talking with others here I have to agree I won't be happy with that small of a telescope. Any Suggestions, advice etc will be greatly appreciated.



#2 Stelios

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 08:56 PM

Hate to be bearer of bad news, but the telescope is way too big for the mount *for DSO astrophotography*. It would be fine for visual and (if equipped with a motor) planetary astrophotography. 

 

So even if you find a cheaper motor than the upgrade kit Orion provides with GoTo capabilities, you would be outfitting a doomed army. :(

 

At real small budgets, it's perhaps best to get a scope for visual, and get separately a camera tracker and a used DSLR for astrophotography. 



#3 BillyBlast01

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 09:01 PM

Hate to be bearer of bad news, but the telescope is way too big for the mount *for DSO astrophotography*. It would be fine for visual and (if equipped with a motor) planetary astrophotography. 

 

So even if you find a cheaper motor than the upgrade kit Orion provides with GoTo capabilities, you would be outfitting a doomed army. frown.gif

 

At real small budgets, it's perhaps best to get a scope for visual, and get separately a camera tracker and a used DSLR for astrophotography. 

You are not the bearer of bad news that's why I'm here to make sure I put together the correct setup. Being on a fixed income I need to do this one step at a time and do it right the first time. Thanks for the input.



#4 coopman

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 09:53 PM

Current thinking is that the total weight of the equipment should not exceed half of the stated max. capacity of the mount.

#5 bjulihn

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 09:56 PM

Hi BillyBlast01;

 

I agree with Stelios about that mount for astrophotography. Here's my thoughts. Feel free to ignore it. 

 

I think you need to decide if you are mostly a visual guy who wants to dabble is AP(astrophotography) or are really going for AP. If you are really going for AP, then aperture is not nearly as big a consideration. The sensitivity of digital cameras, especially cooled CMOS camera; plus the length of exposures stacked together really makes aperture a much smaller consideration than with visual observing. In fact, learning AP is so complex that it is much much easier to learn on shorter focal length telescopes and then try it on longer focal lengths. The 1000mm fl of that Orion scope is certainly doable for learning, but to keep the stars from trailing in images you will need a (lot) better mount.

 

If AP is what you want, there is no way around this: the mount is 70-80% of the equipment equation. A $10,000 super high end triplet refractor on a cheap mount will produce junk photos. A $399 GSO 6" f4 Newtonian on a decent mid-range mount can produce really good stuff. The larger the scope, the more expensive you have to go for a mount that can handle it. And the longer the focal length, the better tracking the mount has to have to keep stars round. I will now step my foot in it. Some people image with a Celestron AVX (new $899) but the weeping and wailing factor seems high and the usable frames from a long night of imaging sounds low. The iOptron CEM25p (new $948) seems to work pretty well but you have to keep the scope and equipment pretty light. The Orion Sirius (new $1099) is used by a fair number of people for AP and seems to do okay. I think the comparable mount in the Sky Watcher line is the HEQ5 (new $1150). I think most people doing AP would tell you these are the minimum range mount to consider.

 

I am using the iOptron iEQ30 Pro with either my 80mm f6 triplet or my 6" f4 newtonian. I doubt I could go any larger on the scope without having to upgrade to a heavier mount that costs a lot more. Others will have different opinions than I have expressed but I think I am speaking a majority opinion on this stuff. Almost everyone who attempts AP on a budget, tries it with an inadequate mount and gets frustrated before they face the reality. Careful patient shopping here on Cloudy Nights could get you a good deal on a used mount and most people seem to take pretty good care of their equipment. That's how I bought my mount.

 

I think I speak for all of us in wishing well in this adventure!


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#6 colinrm

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 10:03 PM

You might be able to get one of those motor drive units to drive the RA axis.  Plop something cheap like the Svbony SV305 in there, and I bet you can capture some deep sky stuff.  Why not try it?  The worst you can do is be amazed at deep sky stuff in your own yard.  Imaging a galaxy or nebula your first few times is always worth it!

 

Yeah, the mount may not be ideal for perfect coffee-table book images like most posters imply.  But you can still explore the cosmos and have a good time!


Edited by colinrm, 07 August 2020 - 10:06 PM.

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#7 colinrm

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 10:04 PM

In particular, I was thinking of mounting this to your mount somehow to make the RA driven:

 

https://www.amazon.c.../dp/B00039R23G/


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#8 bjulihn

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 03:04 PM

Hey BillyBlast;

 

Just a quick one. I see this morning an Orion Sirius EQ-G on CN for $700. That would be a reasonable basic mount at a pretty reasonable price to go for AP. If on the other hand, you see yourself mostly as a visual guy and just want to dabble with AP, then a more modest mount should suffice. Figuring out which direction you want to pursue is sometimes the hardest part. My own experience was that my interests have changed through the years.


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