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Attach a DSLR camera to a telescope lens

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#1 emad

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 10:10 PM

Hello all. I will be purchasing the Nikon D5600 and want to connect it to my Celestron 8SE. But I want a telescope lens between the camera and the telescope. The lens is Celestron X-CEL LX 1.25" 9mm. Is there an adapter that anyone knows of that will fit this lens and the DSLR? Is this a proper way to photograph planets?

Thanks.

#2 Gipht

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 10:45 PM

There is a seldom used process called eyepiece projection.  To use eyepiece projection you use an adapter such as:https://www.amazon.c...,aps,279&sr=8-2.

 

These adapters generally only work with simple plossi eyepieces, and will sometimes have problems reaching focus on an eyepiece as small as a 9mm.   Most people go with some form of barlow lens in place of an eyepiece projection assembly, for simplicity and often a better result.


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#3 emad

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 10:59 PM

There is a seldom used process called eyepiece projection. To use eyepiece projection you use an adapter such as:https://www.amazon.c...,aps,279&sr=8-2.

These adapters generally only work with simple plossi eyepieces, and will sometimes have problems reaching focus on an eyepiece as small as a 9mm. Most people go with some form of barlow lens in place of an eyepiece projection assembly, for simplicity and often a better result.


Thanks for a prompt response. I did some research and all the eyepiece projection pieces may not fit the X-Cel eyepiece I have due it's large diameter. When photographing with a dslr and a telescope, are barlow lenses the only way to achieve magnification? I would like to photograph saturn and Jupiter but want to zoom to see more detail.

#4 BQ Octantis

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 01:22 AM

Hi emad,

 

I do eyepiece projection capture all the time. Here is my best Jupiter of the season:

 

post-273658-0-61058500-1596334243.jpg

Jupiter 2020-07-30, Skywatcher 7-in Mak, Fujiyama 12.5mm orthoscopic, Canon 600D/T3i

 

And here's my best Saturn of the season:

 

post-273658-0-74522200-1591508523.jpg

Saturn 2020-06-06, Skywatcher 7-in Mak, Fujiyama 18mm orthoscopic, Canon 600D/T3i

 

Here is my setup (which for me would be identical on the 8SE—you would just need the Nikon T-thread-to-bayonet adapter):

 

post-273658-0-73884900-1556697456.jpg

 

post-273658-0-96655700-1556698565.jpg

 

A few thoughts:

 

  1. The X-Cel eyepieces are designed to give short focal length eyepieces longer eye relief…but this comes at the expense of sharpness. They also have a wide FOV, which lets in ambient light outside of the planet's area of regard…this comes at the expense of contrast. Both result in lower image quality. Reco a Plössl or an orthoscopic/Abbe. And reco a non-extensible eyepiece holder for the short focal lengths you need for planetary; the extensible holders tend to be too close to the limit of the distance from the eyepiece to the sensor, beyond which you get ghosting. They're also prone to slip in a wind storm or a tripod bump.
  2. For reasonable-size images, you need to stack 1000-2000 frames. And these need to be captured within 3 minutes for Jupiter and 6 minutes for Saturn (to prevent smudging from the planets' rotation)—a tall order for stills out of an SLR camera (especially having to wait for mirror slap vibration to dissipate between frames). In-camera video has significant compression that degrades image quality, so the typical method for DSLR capture is LiveView over USB. Unfortunately, Nikon LiveView has very lossy compression that makes its LiveView capture less than ideal. Canons are much better suited to LiveView planetary. But don't take my word for it—I've never tried this with a Nikon. But then I've never seen any planetary images out of a Nikon, either…

 

That is all.

 

BQ


Edited by BQ Octantis, 09 August 2020 - 03:25 AM.

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#5 emad

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 12:36 PM

Hi emad,

I do eyepiece projection capture all the time. Here is my best Jupiter of the season:

post-273658-0-61058500-1596334243.jpg
Jupiter 2020-07-30, Skywatcher 7-in Mak, Fujiyama 12.5mm orthoscopic, Canon 600D/T3i

And here's my best Saturn of the season:

post-273658-0-74522200-1591508523.jpg
Saturn 2020-06-06, Skywatcher 7-in Mak, Fujiyama 18mm orthoscopic, Canon 600D/T3i

Here is my setup (which for me would be identical on the 8SE—you would just need the Nikon T-thread-to-bayonet adapter):

post-273658-0-73884900-1556697456.jpg

post-273658-0-96655700-1556698565.jpg

A few thoughts:

  • The X-Cel eyepieces are designed to give short focal length eyepieces longer eye relief…but this comes at the expense of sharpness. They also have a wide FOV, which lets in ambient light outside of the planet's area of regard…this comes at the expense of contrast. Both result in lower image quality. Reco a Plössl or an orthoscopic/Abbe. And reco a non-extensible eyepiece holder for the short focal lengths you need for planetary; the extensible holders tend to be too close to the limit of the distance from the eyepiece to the sensor, beyond which you get ghosting. They're also prone to slip in a wind storm or a tripod bump.
  • For reasonable-size images, you need to stack 1000-2000 frames. And these need to be captured within 3 minutes for Jupiter and 6 minutes for Saturn (to prevent smudging from the planets' rotation)—a tall order for stills out of an SLR camera (especially having to wait for mirror slap vibration to dissipate between frames). In-camera video has significant compression that degrades image quality, so the typical method for DSLR capture is LiveView over USB. Unfortunately, Nikon LiveView has very lossy compression that makes its LiveView capture less than ideal. Canons are much better suited to LiveView planetary. But don't take my word for it—I've never tried this with a Nikon. But then I've never seen any planetary images out of a Nikon, either…
That is all.

BQ
Thanks for these tips. They're actually super useful. Since high end plossl eyepieces tend to be inexpensive I may purchase a few just for photography. And great info on the image quality being reduced with a video! I wouldn't have known that right off the bat. I will try and provide my results here. That may be a while from now though haha. Great pictures btw! That's the level I strive for.

Edited by emad, 09 August 2020 - 12:37 PM.


#6 BQ Octantis

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 08:51 PM

Thanks for these tips. They're actually super useful. Since high end plossl eyepieces tend to be inexpensive I may purchase a few just for photography. And great info on the image quality being reduced with a video! I wouldn't have known that right off the bat. I will try and provide my results here. That may be a while from now though haha. Great pictures btw! That's the level I strive for.

No worries. I started with planetary imaging by borrowing a friend's Plössl set. From it, I determined the sizes that were most useful; I then bought orthoscopic eyepieces at those focal lengths.

 

Good luck!

 

BQ


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