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First equipment, small budget

astrophotography beginner cassegrain refractor
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#1 Deep Blue

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 02:42 PM

I’m in the middle of the painful process of deciding my first rig for astrophotography and some night observing. So, after reading and listening to hundreds of treads and YouTube videos this is what I think it would be a good compromising for a startup set (and my budget). Please be brutally honest!

I will start with the piece of the setup that I already own which is the camera.  I have an DSLR canon 70D. Is this camera any good for astrophotography?

Now, what I don’t have.  During my research I have read in many places that in astrophotography the main piece of the puzzle is the mount.  So, following that criteria I would put a big piece of my budget on a Sky-Watcher qe6-r pro. I think this mount would give me some room for growth in the future. Does this make sense?

For the telescope, I’m thinking on a Explore Scientific ED80 or ED102 (or AR152).  At the beginning I was thinking on a Celestron C8 but now I’m leaning more towards the refractors.

Should I be looking at some completely different equipment altogether?

Thanks for help!

 

Deep Blue



#2 scadvice

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 03:14 PM

Camera is fine I believe. 

Mount is a good selection for growth. It is a bit heavy but if you have no lifting problems a mute point.

My opinion  for a OTA is to stay with a F/5 to F/7 refractor. A C8 is not a good choice.

I don't really know Explore Scientific ED80 or ED102 OTA's but I suggest sticking with triplets in any OTA you get. I have heard (hearsay) that some of their focusers on certain models are poor so maybe someone who knows the story will speak up.

 

I know these OTA's and either of them would be a good choice as a triplet and with a rack and pinion focuser. .Be sure to consider a Flattener in your pricing.

 

Stellarvue 80mm Triplets new and used, probably too pricey but top end stuff excellent.

William Optics Triplets. I had a version of the Gran Turismo 81mm and it was nice.

 

Be careful. Bigger is not better unless you pay for it. i.e. a 102mm  at the same price as a 80mm. Likely the 80mm will give better images. 


Edited by scadvice, 09 August 2020 - 03:14 PM.


#3 sg6

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 03:20 PM

Mount is good, scope depends on glass, on ES the FCD-100 is the better, camera is a potential problem.

Will do fair the problem is the internal filters. One of the filters basically cuts out a big proportion of the Ha wavelength. So Ha targets/objects are therefore more difficult.

 

As that is what you have that is what you use, at least for now.

 

You will need a flattener and on ES that could be a problem. They seem unable to just make a flattener that works. Honestly no idea why.

 

Before you decide on the ES scope check the available flatteners, then ask on some section here what people have found. Odd but I think ES pulled a load off the market as they just didn't work. Some odd history to ES flatteners.

 

More obvious are the WO scopes, but where the ES 80 FCD-100 is likely around $1000 the WO GT81 is around $1300. You want a triplet.

 

My problem here is I have 3 WO scopes and last scope I bought was not WO, a Skywatcher, and to put it simply I am not happy with it. Does work but as I said "only just", and I might keep it, or give it away - SW 72ED. Really unimpressed. And whatever is next will be another WO. They seem to have got it right.

 

So you will need a flattener, scope your decision and the 80 FCD-100 should be good, just check and double check on the available flatteners. Mount good. Camera is pick your targets - don't for for the Ha ones without expecting to spend say 2 or 3 times as much time on the red bits.

 

Camera will need an Intervalometer, $25 I suspect.


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#4 Mark233

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 03:22 PM

The Astro-Tech AT80EDT would be a nice scope that gives a lot of bang for the buck. Make sure you get the dedicated field flattener/focal reducer for this scope as well. The focuser is more than adequate to get you going.


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#5 Supernova74

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 03:22 PM

Hi deep blue personally i wish was in the carribian blue at the moment instead of the uk.

anyway as I can see you already have done some research which is a good thing as I’m not an AP,or imager Amateur Astronomer I’m mainly visual.but I’m happy to see you haven’t put the cart before the horse kind of anology as many newbies come into the hobby see the biggest scope thay desire what to go into imaging or AP Astronomy and forget the important little details in the mounting and you are completely right as the mount is the foundation you will need to take longer exposure times with also has to be rock solid and obviously track very well. So going for the biggest mount with good payload capacity physically you can also handle is the way to go.

 

The skywatcher EQ5,HEQ5 and EQ6 pro and so on are all very capable mounts with generous payload capacity however with still sticking to the trend or brand there is another worthwhile contender in the line up which I believe is in similer price range to the EQ6 pro and that would be the NEQ6 still by Skywatcher however with a very generous payload capacity of 25kg and there is no other manufacture comes close for your money.its quite heavy and bulky but if your looking for a mount which is rock solid and can hold a Meade 12” sct adequately has to be worth looking at.as you most probably aware where some newbies make a mistake is thay think thay can use the mounts full payload for imaging this is far from the truth and ideally with your scope,Accessories and imaging camera you need to try to get the weight down by roughly 50% of the mounts full capacity this allows maximum efficiency when tracking and long exposure imaging.

you might be able to achieve closer to 15kg as long the scope is very well balanced because it’s a rather beefy mount.



#6 Huangdi

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 04:05 PM

the mount is great, no doubt about that.

The scope is fine too... but before you buy it think about this: eventually, you'll be sick of the chromatic aberration ever so slightly degrading your image. There isn't a lot of it, but it's there. so if you want clean images down the road, I suggest you get a nice triplet now.

I wish I had had the money to purchase a triplet back when I started, but I was broke and all I could afford was an Orion ED80 which I bought used for 290€. it was a great purchase, but now I find myself longing for a triplet.

#7 scadvice

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 05:00 PM

The Astro-Tech AT80EDT would be a nice scope that gives a lot of bang for the buck. Make sure you get the dedicated field flattener/focal reducer for this scope as well. The focuser is more than adequate to get you going.


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Interesting, A time back Stellarvue was selling entree level Doublet OTA's that look exactly like the that Astro-Tech triplet. I in fact have a 80mm doublet version sitting right here and it looks just like it. They no longer import scopes and only make and sell their own here in the states. Very possible the Astro-Techs come from the same source. If so, it would be a reasonable OTA to start and learn with. Like Mark said you want to make sure you get the field flattener at the same time if you buy one.


Edited by scadvice, 09 August 2020 - 05:01 PM.


#8 Stelios

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 05:48 PM

As everyone said, the EQ6R-Pro is a great choice (as long as you realize it's a very *heavy* mount, a consideration if you're portable and neither young nor strong). 

 

For a scope, the Astrotech refractor offerings give you best bang for the buck, and they also have nice mounting rings, a little plus you'll appreciate. Cross out the AR152 or any other achromats from your thoughts. You need at least an ED scope, and preferably a triplet. You want to be in the F/4 to F/7.5 range, the latter only reluctantly. F/6 is a great starter F/ratio for a scope.

 

You will need a flattener, especially with an APS-C sensor like your 70D has. Opt for a flattener rather than a reducer, they are more forgiving for lower-end scopes.

 

If you opt for a focal length greater than about 400mm you will need to guide. Even with shorter focal lengths, guiding will improve your images. Guiding sounds complicated but isn't. I was guiding before I knew what a histogram was. 


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#9 awong101

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 10:14 PM

As everyone said, the EQ6R-Pro is a great choice (as long as you realize it's a very *heavy* mount, a consideration if you're portable and neither young nor strong). 

 

For a scope, the Astrotech refractor offerings give you best bang for the buck, and they also have nice mounting rings, a little plus you'll appreciate. Cross out the AR152 or any other achromats from your thoughts. You need at least an ED scope, and preferably a triplet. You want to be in the F/4 to F/7.5 range, the latter only reluctantly. F/6 is a great starter F/ratio for a scope.

 

You will need a flattener, especially with an APS-C sensor like your 70D has. Opt for a flattener rather than a reducer, they are more forgiving for lower-end scopes.

 

If you opt for a focal length greater than about 400mm you will need to guide. Even with shorter focal lengths, guiding will improve your images. Guiding sounds complicated but isn't. I was guiding before I knew what a histogram was. 

So, would you recommend the first scope to be a triplet because they're objectively better than the best doublets? Is there a focal length where the optical difference between the doublet and triplet becomes more evident, assuming all else being equal?

 

Thanks!



#10 scadvice

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 11:01 PM

Basically, yes for the most part. The wider the field the more difficult it is to get the colors to converge at focus. 


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#11 awong101

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 12:43 AM

Basically, yes for the most part. The wider the field the more difficult it is to get the colors to converge at focus. 

Wider the field, more difficult... So the chromatic aberrations are more apparent and noticeable in telescopes with lower focal lengths? 



#12 SilverLitz

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 08:47 AM

For AP, avoid achros.  I would not be focusing on ES scopes, but if you go ES, definitely pay up for the FCD-100 glass.  My 1st scope was an ES ED102CF (FCD1) and it has bad CA, and all ES focusers are seriously lacking (unless you get the Feathertouch option, $$$).  My photos got much better when I went to an SW Esprit 100.  Here is my standard, $5K gear post:

 

Astrophotography Gear ($5K Budget)

 

I would 1st research the AP targets you are interested in; note the wide range of sizes of these targets and make sure these are visible at your location, with altitudes of >30deg.  With this info, you will find out that no one setup can fit all of these targets.  For DSOs, I break down in approx. 3 sizes: Small: most galaxies (M51, 11'x6'); Medium: most nebulas (M42, 90'x60'); Large: M31 (180'x40'), North American + Pelican Nebulas (120'x120'), Cygnus Loop (180'x180').  Planets are much smaller.

 

Then, investigate your locations sky conditions; how dark is it?  (Bortle Scale); what are the typical seeing conditions? (arc-sec, see Meteoblue.com).  Seeing conditions will greatly impact how much detail you can achieve.  Darker skies will make RGB imaging more doable, allow longer exposure times (before sky fog clips your histogram), and allows good images with fewer hours of integration.  Urban and a lot suburban skies will make imaging in narrowband, with a mono camera and filterwheel, a necessity.

 

Field of View (FoV, framing composition in X by Y arc-min) and image-scale (measure of detail in arc-sec/pixel) are achieved by the combination of focal length and aperture of the telescope and sensor size and pixel pitch of the camera.  Wider FoV can be achieved by a larger sensor or shorter FL scope with larger image circle.  Image detail can be achieved by smaller pixels or longer scope FL; all things being equal, larger scope aperture can resolve finer detail (Dawes Limit).  F-ratio (FL/aperture) determines the length of the exposure time; low f/ is "faster", allowing shorter exposures for the same light gathering.

 

The one thing that is important all AP targets is a good mount, though it becomes more critical and expensive for shooting your small targets, with long FL and heavy scopes and highly detailed image scales.  At this budget, I recommend a SW EQ6R-Pro ($1595, $1345 Sale), a very good budget mount w/ 44# rating.  To get better you would pay much more for Losmandy G11 (what I got) or iOptron CEM60 (or newer CEM70), which have higher 60# rating and lower periodic error.  These are also high value mounts, but cost $3K to $4K.

 

For more budgetary constrained mount options, the advice to "put your money where your mount is" is very good advice.  Another good rule of thumb is to keep your total load at 50% of manufacturer’s stated, though Losmandy's loads are supposedly for AP (but I would still haircut it).  The normal budget picks are SW HEQ5 (or Orion Sirius twin) or iOptron CEM40, or for very light imaging loads, the iOptron CEM25.  The widely available budget mount, Celestron AVX, seems to have serious problems (lack of bearings on DEC), though few have gotten “lucky” with a unit that performs OK.  ES has a couple of decent low priced mounts for the seriously budgetary challenged, the EXOS2GT (PMC-8 version) and iEXOS-100.  The EXOS2GT is more robust and capable of the two, and I expect is worth the very modest price difference.  All of these lower cost mounts are more limited in their ability to handle longer FL scopes, heavier imaging trains, or in guiding longer exposures.

 

If you will only be doing AP with a light DSLR and moderate FL lens (up to 135mm), camera trackers are popular, but they are much more limited than the above mounts.  Most camera trackers: 1) only move in RA (DEC is fixed); 2) very few have the ability to autoguide (and then only in RA); 3) do not have ability to GoTo; 4) do not have ability to finely tune pointing by platesolving; and 5) do not include a tripod.  Think of the iEXOS-100 as a camera tracker, but without the above disadvantages, and the ability to handle a light 80mm scope and camera, all with a similar price to the more capable camera trackers.  The camera trackers main advantage is that it is very light for those who want to take their light imaging rig on a hike.

 

You might ultimately want a couple of cameras to give you a wider range of image-scales and FoVs.  But with your budget, get only one, but make sure that it makes sense for your year 1 scope and target size.  If you already have a DSLR, use it at first.  I think crop sensor DSLRs make more sense than full-frame, as most scopes will have problems with vignetting and field flatness with those large sensors, even with a field flattener.  That said, use what you have.  If you do not already have a DSLR (or have a need for one for general photography), do NOT buy one.  Cooled astrocams make MUCH more sense.  I would suggest getting a monochrome camera with filterwheel/filters, as they give you more flexibility for narrowband, are more efficient, and give you more resolution.  I suggest a 7 or 8 position filterwheel, which allow for LRGB and NB filters.  With budgetary constraints limit yourself initially with on LRGB filters. 

 

Two of the best deals in astrocams are the ZWO 183MM-Pro ($1000; which I have) and 1600MM-Cool ($1280).  The 183 has a smaller sensor (small FoV), but it is higher resolution and more efficient.  The ZWO has attractive priced packages with the 1600 with filterwheel and filters.  Filterwheels and filters will cost several hundred dollars more.  You can save money by getting an OSC camera, but you will be giving up flexibility to shoot NB, efficiency, and resolution.

 

Get gear that is good for one of the AP target sizes; I would suggest start with the Medium size targets.  This is NOT starting "small" as in cheaper, but start with high quality, with gear you will keep and use in the future.  This will allow you to learn and get more intuition on what works and what is important.  A long scope is NOT "better" than a shorter scope, as a hammer is not better than a screwdriver.  The "best" scope is the scope matches your needs to shoot the particular target, and the "best" for M51 would more than likely be "terrible" for M31.

 

For medium size targets, the normal suggestion is high quality, APO refractors of 70-80mm aperture of f/6 or faster with a field flattener and possibly a focal reducer.  This can be expanded to larger, but faster scopes, such as Skywatcher Esprit 100 (550mm FL, f/5.5), and AT92 (506mm FL, f/5.5).  I have the Esprit 100, which I shoot at both 550mm (native, included FF) and 413mm (f/4.13, with TSAPORED075 FF/FR), and I love it.  I highly recommend the Esprit 100 ($2500, with everything included, even FF), with the idea of later getting a FR for a wider and faster option.  Other good lower priced options include the Esprit 80 (400mm FL, f/5; $1650, with everything included, even FF), WO Star71 II (350mm FL, f/4.9; $1200, petzval design, no FF necessary), WO GT71 (419mm FL, f/5.9; $828 + $198 for FF/FR), and SV SVX080T-3SV (480mm FL, f/6; $2000, with everything included, even FF).  TS Optics out of Germany also has many good value scopes, and the Sharpstar 61EDPH II (335mm f/5.5, 275mm f/4.5, $729 w/ FF/FR) and Sharpstar 76EDPH (418mm f/5.5, 342mm f/4.5, $1099 w/ FF/FR) look like very intriguing budget picks, especially when paired with their FF/FR.

 

When choosing your camera, estimate is FoV with your specific scopes FL.  You want this FoV to be larger than the FoV of your target, to allow cushion for: stacking artifacts, dithering, differing camera rotations, and slight framing errors.  My Esprit 100 with FF/FR, 413mm FL, with my ASI183MM-Pro camera gives me 110'x73' FoV with a 1.2 arc-sec/pixel image scale.  At the native 550mm, this combo gives a higher resolution and tighter 82'x55' FoV with a 0.9 arc-sec/pixel image scale.  The ASI183 is practically highest resolution camera with a decent size sensor available, and can be used with longer FL scopes for small targets, if seeing conditions are good enough.

 

 

You will also have extra costs for guide-scopes, guide-cam, various cables, USB hubs, dew heaters, power supplies, computer, software, etc. …


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#13 Deep Blue

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 10:54 AM

Thanks guys for all your suggestions.  If there is something clear to me is that I have so much to learn confused1.gif . It is really good to know that there are so many knowledgeable people in this forum willing to help a lost soul like me. 

 

Deep Blue



#14 nimitz69

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 11:29 AM

As you have already realized AP can be somewhat complicated to learn. It’s also quite un intuitive which can lead you to make bad choices that seemed good. The thing to realize right now is that learning AP is different than doing AP.

The typical advise of get a small, fast APO triplet refractor & a solid AP mount is because learning AP is MUCH easier and more forgiving of issues with this setup.

There are making pieces to AP: PA, focusing, taking cal frames,plate solving, image capture, guiding, auto focus, mono cameras with EFWs. The best advise is to take things in pieces and only add capability after you have nailed the simple things.

Example, until you can nail PA & focus most other things won’t matter because your subs will be useless. Next comes plate solving instead of spending large amounts of time doing star alignments for your mount, then guiding, then auto focus, etc.

Don’t get caught in the trap of wanting to produce ‘pretty pictures’ immediately vice really understanding and learning the proper baseline techniques. If you take shortcuts now to produce a pretty picture to put on your FB page you’ll likely build bad habits that will always haunt you.

Prime example are cal frames. I consider them a mandatory part of doing AP yet i see countless beginners who don’t do them & make excuses why they will do them ‘next time’.

The universe isn’t going anywhere and this could be a lifetime hobby ....
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#15 Electrons

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 07:07 AM

Hi Cloudy Nights!

 

I am also in a similar situation. I have been visually observing on a smaller newtonian but am now looking to upgrade. With a 500$ budget, I am still figuring out whether I should go down the visual or astrophotography path. I also already have a camera, a Nikon DSLR (D5100), so is there a decent mount and scope I can pick up for around that price?



#16 Stelios

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 10:31 AM

With only $500 for scope and mount, you are better off doing visual (or planetary AP). 

 

If you do want to dabble in DSO AP, the best you can do is get a camera tracker and just image with your DSLR lenses (no scope).


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#17 17.5Dob

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 10:42 AM

Hi Cloudy Nights!

 

I am also in a similar situation. I have been visually observing on a smaller newtonian but am now looking to upgrade. With a 500$ budget, I am still figuring out whether I should go down the visual or astrophotography path. I also already have a camera, a Nikon DSLR (D5100), so is there a decent mount and scope I can pick up for around that price?

You could buy a small "camera tracker" like the Star Adventurer and use your existing camera/ lenses.

But beware, the little trackers are the "Gateway drug" to more serious addiction...



#18 charlieb123

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 11:02 AM

From the perspective of the very minimum for the money with good results.

I started with a AZGTI, Canon T7 and a 200mm Takumar SMC lens.

 

Not wanting to deal with an inadequate mount and the ability to use a larger scope I upgraded to.

 

HEQ5Pro.

AT80ED. (not EDT)

Canon T7.

A laptop with APT.

With just those 4 components I've been able to get a lot of satisfaction with AP without piles of money.

You can get by without a field flattener, guiding setup and autofocuser to start. You can add them as needed later on.

 

Sure, your stars will be elongated at the outside of your images but you're going to crop the image anyway and a little elongation is not a big deal when getting started.

 

[For myself and further enjoyment of the hobby - I've been making my own guide camera using a Sony IMX291 sensor and my own autofocuser using an arduino, stepper motor and driver.]


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#19 Noobulosity

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 11:58 AM

To the OP, I started in a similar spot as you are in now.  I acquired the EQ6-R Pro and a Zenithstar 103 scope.  You're thinking in the right line, go with something in the 80-100mm refractor range.  DO NOT get an SCT to start out.  I've been imaging with my setup for a couple years and tried messing with an 8" SCT and just sold it.  It's too much scope for me to use right now.  With a learning curve as steep as this hobby has, the last thing you need is a scope that's really challenging.

 

I also image with a DSLR.  This is a great way to get into imaging, as you already have the camera.  Why not use it?  If you can't/won't use a PC to assist with image capture, get yourself a wired or wireless intervalometer to shoot your sub-exposures without shaking the scope and mount by touching the camera.  If you can use something like a laptop, you can do basic image capture using tools like Backyard EOS,  or in my case I use N.I.N.A. which is free and has a LOT of tools for you to grow into as you learn more about the hobby.  You can use either of these tools without getting into auto-guiding, yet.  Or you can set yourself up with a guide cam like the ASI120MM Mini or ASI290MM Mini and a small 40-50mm guide scope.  (I use the William Optics guide scope with the 290MM Mini.)  It's up to you if you want to add another layer to your starting setup or not.  With the EQ6-R Pro, you can probably take 1-2 minute sub-exposures unguided at 80mm, as long as your polar alignment is good. I've gotten good subs in that range with my Z103 unguided.  These mounts are pretty solid.

 

The big advantage (to me) of using a laptop or PC to assist you is the use of plate-solving to find targets.  Yes, it takes some getting used to, but once you have it working it's SO MUCH easier than trial-and-error location of targets.  You mount will get close, and the plate-solver will get you dead-on.  No more manual pointing, manual star alignment, etc.  Set up polar alignment, lock your mount clutches at your 0 markers, point at your target area and let the software do the rest.

 

Lots of folks are happy to help you get things going as you learn the basics.  If you want, I'm happy to walk you through my own setup on a Hangouts call or something, just PM me if you're interested in doing that.  Shoot, I'm still learning a LOT myself, even after 2 years of heavy reading, research, and practice.  Honestly, you'll NEVER run out of things to learn in this hobby, as long as you want to keep expanding your knowledge.

 

As far as the poster asking about a $500 budget, you won't get a whole lot for that money, unfortunately.  But, if you really want to get into imaging and you have a camera and lenses, you could start with wide-field imaging using a sky tracker.  But, if you want to get into DSO or planetary imaging, that type of mount won't be nearly sufficient.  Sadly, you'll probably have to drop 3-4x that amount to be happy with the equipment, or you'll be fighting your mount for good tracking/guiding/vibration reduction.  And I'm guessing you'd want to replace the Newtonian with another scope, since it will probably be too big/heavy for a budget mount.  Maybe you could find a used mount for a little bit above your $500 budget, like a iOptron CEM25 or something that will do fine with smaller scopes, then toss your camera and lenses on it until you can buy a scope.  I would think you could get away with 200-400mm lenses or longer on a mount like that without too much trouble.  In general, avoid the AVX mounts if you don't want to roll the dice on getting a good mount for imaging.

 

As much as it saddens me, astrophotography really does have a fairly steep barrier to entry-level gear.


Edited by Noobulosity, 11 September 2020 - 12:09 PM.

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#20 Electrons

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 02:02 PM

Thank you for your advice! It is nice to know some places to guide me through the unkowns of this hobby. Just one more question, how much can you photograph with an 8" dob? Just the moon and planets? Or some DSOs too?



#21 Noobulosity

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 02:22 PM

Thank you for your advice! It is nice to know some places to guide me through the unkowns of this hobby. Just one more question, how much can you photograph with an 8" dob? Just the moon and planets? Or some DSOs too?

The issue with any scope not on an equatorial mount is that it won't rotate with the object as it's tracking across the night sky.  Now, if your Dobsonian is manual, then tracking itself (or lack thereof) becomes a limitation, and that makes things even more restrictive.  But, generally, you'll be fairly limited in your exposure time, and that all depends on the amount of magnification you get through your scope.  Not having experience with alt-az imaging, I'm just taking a guess here.  But I'd say, with a tracking alt-az mount, your longest exposures may be anywhere from 5-20 seconds, which will limit you to mostly brighter objects or taking TONS of exposures to stack and bring out details.

 

So, can you do it?  Sure!  But you'll likely find you hit the limitations pretty quickly for anything other than casual imaging.


Edited by Noobulosity, 11 September 2020 - 02:23 PM.


#22 Electrons

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Posted 12 September 2020 - 07:44 AM

Thank you! I guess AP will have to wait for a larger budget...



#23 Noobulosity

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Posted 12 September 2020 - 08:51 AM

Thank you! I guess AP will have to wait for a larger budget...


It's not ideal, but you can still learn using short exposures on a tripod with wider targets. Orion and Andromeda might be big and bright enough. Or the Milky Way. Use that to learn about stacking and processing until you can buy an adequate mount for longer exposures.

#24 Peregrinatum

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Posted 12 September 2020 - 09:58 AM

You have a good plan, but think about how you are going to process your images... different routes to go here ranging from free to $250.



#25 Noobulosity

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Posted 12 September 2020 - 10:15 AM

Agreed, don't forget the software side.

Personally, I've been going the Photoshop route. I tried Gimp, but found it hard to get anything good. For $10/mo it was a good investment in learning the ropes. Eventually I'll go with PixInsight, but that can wait until I refine my capturing skills.


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