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What are some good value for money 70mm Solar filters ?

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#1 Dinosour23

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 05:47 PM

Hi there !

I just purchased myself 11x70mm binoculars and wanted to inquire about 2x70mm Solar filters.

Is there something that is good value for money with decent quality that is worthwhile ?  I prefer Glass but I don't know much about it. Film looks like it will tear after a couple days :)

 

I'd love to hear

 

Thanks ! 


Edited by Dinosour23, 10 August 2020 - 05:53 PM.


#2 Mike G.

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 05:58 PM

film is definitely more fragile but better optically than glass.  your best bet is Baader film, either with their holders or make your own.  detail is always a struggle with white light so you need the best transmission you can get.  the baader film is the best.


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#3 Dinosour23

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 06:15 PM

Ahh very well !!  Do you think the A4 Baader is plenty ? Or would you order some spares.. I just don't know how easy it is to destroy this film during transport. 

Do they sell holders for 70mm ? Can I have a link please for an example ? 


Edited by Dinosour23, 10 August 2020 - 06:16 PM.


#4 eros312

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 06:22 PM

You need 2 of these https://agenaastro.c...er-asbf-70.html



#5 LDW47

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 09:54 PM

AB9F6CA7-D117-4353-9BAF-1384A962B5F8.jpeg

 

From B&H Telescope and Camera, in New York City I believe, for around $60 US and free ship. Solid as a rock !  The wrinkles are the fit to allow for expansion / contraction depending on temperatures, on hot days there is virtually no wrinkles whereas this was taken under the air conditioning. Research the Baader solar filters they are top of the line, they invented the film and the literature that comes with it explains it all as do the online searches of the Baader site !  Good Luck and Clear Skize !  PS:  And by the way they have similar for binos !


Edited by LDW47, 10 August 2020 - 10:01 PM.


#6 LDW47

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 09:59 PM

Ahh very well !!  Do you think the A4 Baader is plenty ? Or would you order some spares.. I just don't know how easy it is to destroy this film during transport. 

Do they sell holders for 70mm ? Can I have a link please for an example ? 

I gave you a dealer site above and the filters come well packaged in a Baader box. These are professional grade not some pick up from a department store such as Wal ....... !


Edited by LDW47, 10 August 2020 - 10:00 PM.


#7 PatrickVt

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Posted 12 August 2020 - 09:21 AM

I have four different solar filters that I use regularly.  Here they are in order of quality:

 

1.  I use a Meade 2" Solar Wedge on my Explore Scientific ED 102mm refractor.  This is the clear winner by a very noticeable margin.  I also use a Continuum filter and a UV/IR Cut filter with the wedge and it improves my imaging.  This combo is, by far, the most expensive route to go for white light solar viewing/imaging.  The wedge cost over $300...  the Continuum filter is almost $200...  the UV/IR Cut filter is around $130.  So, it is pricey but provides the best white light solar viewing/imaging of the photosphere.

 

2.  My Spectrum glass solar filter is the next best filter I own and use regularly.  I use this on my Skywatcher ED 72mm refractor.  I get crisp views of the sun with this filter and, honestly, it is simple to use.  It provides crisp, contrasty and bright views.  I just screw it down over my dew shield.  Cost was in the $90 range (varies by size/aperture), if I remember correctly.  I purchased it directly from Spectrum because everyone else seemed to be out-of-stock at the time.  

 

3.  My next best solar filter is Baader film.  Everyone always raves about the Baader solar film but I find it quite disappointing compared to my two other filters above.  It simply is not as crisp as the glass filter and it would be silly to compare it to my solar wedge because the solar wedge is that good.  With the Baader film, I feel like I'm viewing through slightly frosted glass when using this filter... sort of a low contrast view.  Then I move over to my Spectrum glass filter on my ED 72mm and it is bright, contrasty and crisp...  sunspots really stand out and are crisp.  The Baader film seems dull by comparison.  The Baader film only cost me about $35 and I made a wood frame for it to clamp over my dew shield on my Celestron XLT 120mm refractor.  Overall, I'm very disappointed in this filter though.  It required the most work because I made the frame yet it provides less than stellar views compared to my other filters.  Oh, and I feel it is very fragile compared to the first two filters mentioned above.  I baby this filter because I am afraid of damaging it and it must be protected when stored so nothing presses on the filter material or, worse, punctures it.  It does provide 'acceptable' viewing though at a low cost but, overall, I find it disappointing and a pain in the butt because of its fragility.

 

4.  I also use a Celestron Eclipsmart filter on my Celestron 70mm f10 refractor.  This filter is a mylar filter and it is clearly the worst of the bunch.  It is better than not being able to view the sun at all and the filter only costs around $20 so, it is probably a worthwhile expenditure for a cheap beginner scope.  I would say it is a decent beginner filter made for a specific beginner telescope so you can observe the sun so that is convenient and it is low cost.  This filter is sold as an accessory specifically for the Celestron 70mm f10 refractor.  For any other scope, though, I would not recommend purchasing a mylar filter.  

 

My short list of solar filters to buy includes an Ha filter as well as a CaK filter which are significantly more expensive than the above mentioned filters.

 

Patrick




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