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What Else Can I View With a Celestron Nexstar Evolution 5

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#1 KoolMoeDee

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Posted 11 August 2020 - 11:39 PM

Hi All,

 

Ive recently picked up a Celestron Nexstar Evolution 5.

 

We have used it a few times for viewing the moon, Jupiter and Saturn. Given that this is the 5 inch variant of the telescope which is not as powerful at the 8 inch variant. What else is good viewing keeping in mind we have the 5 inch model?

 

If people could share some astrophotography captured with a similar powered scope it would be great to get some decent examples of what is possible.

 

Thank you very much in advance :)



#2 MarkintheDark

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Posted 12 August 2020 - 10:12 AM

Light pollution, atmospheric stability and magnification will play a big role in what you can and can't see with it. I'm not sure astrophotography pics are a good reference; they're likely 'at least' multi-second exposures.. there's exceptions of course, but I don't know if I'd get dead set on using that as a reference. You've got star clusters, nebula, double stars, deep fields.. and there's always just flying blind.. seeing what you see.  I think lower power eyepieces are going to be much more enjoyable for scanning and seeing star fields, generally.  Have you looked into any apps to help you along the way? SkySafari is excellent, and Celestron's basic version of it (SkyPortal) is good to. If you're in a summer climate right now, the going could be a little rough; atmosphere is boiling pretty good in the evenings. 



#3 decep

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Posted 12 August 2020 - 11:03 AM

We have used it a few times for viewing the moon, Jupiter and Saturn. Given that this is the 5 inch variant of the telescope which is not as powerful at the 8 inch variant. What else is good viewing keeping in mind we have the 5 inch model?

 

The C5 has many of advocates on this forum.  It is a really good scope.  Don't sell yourself short.

The whole Messier catalog should be within reach... lots of globular clusters, nebula, and planetary nebulas are well within reach visually.



#4 Eddgie

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Posted 12 August 2020 - 11:16 AM

Hi All,

 

Ive recently picked up a Celestron Nexstar Evolution 5.

 

We have used it a few times for viewing the moon, Jupiter and Saturn. Given that this is the 5 inch variant of the telescope which is not as powerful at the 8 inch variant. What else is good viewing keeping in mind we have the 5 inch model?

 

If people could share some astrophotography captured with a similar powered scope it would be great to get some decent examples of what is possible.

 

Thank you very much in advance smile.gif

First I would address your last request.  Images will almost always produce a result that is far different than what the eye alone can see.  It is actually uncommon to see pictures that actually portray the sky the way it will actually look in a telescope.  Everything you can see will be much dimmer at the eyepiece than images, and in far to many cases, you will see almost nothing.

 

A great deal of your result will be dependent on how much light pollution you have.   If you live in urban or semi-urban skies, you will see far less.  Under these skies the best subjects for you will be bright Globulars like Messier 13 or Messier 22, double stars (and there are a great many beautiful color contrast double stars, with Alberio being one of the prettiest) and brighter open clusters.  Right now Messier 7 and some other large, bright clusters are present down in the southern sky (assuming you are in the northern hemisphere).

 

If you live under darker skies, you have many more options. 

 

So, to help with specific suggestions, it would be good to know your sky quality.



#5 jgraham

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Posted 12 August 2020 - 02:42 PM

I'm a huge fan of my C5s, they make fantastic scopes for a relaxing night of visual. I have added a Vixen style finder mount to all of my visual scopes so that I can add a RACI finder for going off-road with my GoTo mounts. I have found that objects that struggle in the C5 continue to struggle unless you go really big or get out under really dark skies. I find that it is very important to be relaxed and comfortable at the eyepiece to really see what there is to see, so I like to use a comfy seat and a small table. Also, I highly recommend Turn Left at Orion as an observing guide. It is full of suggestions, how to find them, and really nice descriptions.

I spent many years climbing the aperture ladder and it was a journey worth taking, but I now spend move of my time with smaller scopes and the C5 is one of my favorites.

Food for thought.
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#6 Bean614

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Posted 12 August 2020 - 03:44 PM

Hmmmmmm........ Actually,  I'm surprised that you received so many replies, especially considering the fact that Celestron does NOT make an "Evolution-5".



#7 Tom Masterson

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Posted 13 August 2020 - 12:51 PM

The list of objects visible in your 5" is pretty much limited by your patience, skill and determination as an observer. Patience and determination is inherent in the person, skill comes with practice, combined with the other two attributes.

 

Rather than give you a list, I'll attach a photo of a chart I was using just a couple nights ago with my 6". Note that I've had this 6" since 1985 and have spent countless hours with it under skies of all kinds, and it still thrills me with it's views. I got hooked on astronomy viewing the sky with a 50mm scope, then a 3" and later a 4-1/2" I still have drawing of my "discoveries" from those times in the late 1960s.

 

The photo is of a chart page from Sky and Telescope's Pocket Sky atlas. Atlases like this are typically targeted at owners of a 8" scope. That said, probably over 60% or more of the objects shown, are within the reach of your 5" This is the constellation Cygnus, which lies right overhead this time of the year. I spent nearly two hours in this area lone the other night with my 6". Granted, I was under exceptionally dark skies, but many of the objects are visible in less than ideal circumstances.

 

If you are new to the hobby, and don't have a chart, this chart shows star clusters as yellow circles, nebulae in green, with the round green circles being planetary nebulae. Stars with lines through them are doubles or multiples, stars with numbers preceded with a V are variable. What isn't shown are the millions of fainter background stars in this area of the Milky Way. These background stars can make hunting faint objects a challenge, but often just seeing an eyepiece filled with countless glowing suns is the reward. The star at the tip of the Swan's nose - Albireo is a beautiful and famous showpiece double of blue and gold.

 

I didn't have an observing plan, I just looked at the chart, selected a target and took a look. Some were easy, some invisible, and some were in a field of stars way more beautiful than the target object itself.

 

People think astronomy is a hobby of the eye, but in reality it's a hobby of the mind. Nature holds her treasures tightly in a veil of darkness, and coaxing them free from her grasp is the reward - that is, IF the hobby is for you. Not everyone is thrilled observing faint, barely visible fuzzys, night after night. To me, it's not only the aesthetic view of the object, but knowing it's light came so far to strike my eye. That the barely visible smudge in the eyepiece is 100,000,000,000 stars shining in the past, the light having left their surfaces long before humans looked up and wondered what they are, or even knew of their existence. Sometimes its all about seeing how faint I can go with whatever scope I'm using, and sometimes it IS about the aesthetics of the view, as I slowly sweep the summer Milky Way with a low power eyepiece stumbling upon beautiful sight after beautiful sight. It's seeing a thin sliver of an edge on galaxy, or a face on view of one similar to our own - or two different galaxy types in the same view, one an oval spiral, the other irregular containing a violently erupting core like M81 ans 82 near the Big Dipper. Not far from Cygnus is the large bright planetary nebula M27. Although it's named the Dumbbell, I once heard it called the "Apple Core Nebula" which I found described it's appearance in a small scope much better. This is a view of the Sun's future, when it's running out of fuel and has blown off a lot of it's atmosphere into a glowing bubble, Earth long ago extinguished or if it survived physically, rendered lifeless.

 

You've seen Jupiter and Saturn, but have you watched the Great Red Spot rotate into view? Have you watched Io close in on the limb of the Jupiter, to kiss the edge of the planet, then fade away against the background clouds while it's inky black shadow is projected against the surface nearby? Were you still looking when it reappeared at the other limb and broke free into the blackness of space? Last month I watched as Ganymede ever so slowly slipped into shadow behind the planet, getting fainter and fainter until it was winking in and out of visibility, before vanishing all together. It was spectacular! I equate the movement of these moons as like trying to watch the minute hand on a clock move. Have you sat at the eyepiece looking at the first quarter Moon, patiently watching sunlight strike the peaks and rims of craters, like tiny stars in the shadows, or caught sight of the fleeting Lunar X as the light changed on the Moon's surface? I'm only stating these questions to show that the universe is full of amazing things and every one I've mentioned is within the grasp of your 5".

 

But, you ask, how do I find these things? The first trick is to not get too hung up with the technical stuff. That will come with time. Grab a chart, any chart and find something familiar. The Big Dipper, the W of Cassiopeia or the "Northern Cross" of Cygnus and start exploring. Take the time to really look in the eyepiece, because many objects are hiding in the darkness, and part of the fun, is the thrill (or frustration) of the hunt. Be patient and don't get discouraged. Every year I have a friend that spends an hour at the eyepiece of his 8", just to locate what may be Pluto barely winking in and out of visibility, then again the next night to confirm his observation. He's been observing for over 50 years. If you can find anyone to observe with, and observing buddy can really help- especially if they have some experience that they can share.

 

I hope this helps encourage you to explore and discover why all of us here love the hobby. Always keep in mind every piece of equipment, regardless of size, complexity and cost, has it limitations. The same skills you learn to overcome the limitations of a 5", will serve you well if some day you own a 30" or in reality, when sit down at the console of the world's largest telescope. The universe hold her secrets tight no matter who is looking to find them.

 

 

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#8 ShaulaB

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Posted 13 August 2020 - 12:59 PM

This scope is small enough to be driven in anyvehicle to darker skies. Go after some Drops.

#9 Sthlm

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Posted 13 August 2020 - 03:35 PM

Hmmmmmm........ Actually,  I'm surprised that you received so many replies, especially considering the fact that Celestron does NOT make an "Evolution-5".

They sell it with C5. See link below.

 

https://www.celestro...ion-5-telescope



#10 Bean614

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Posted 13 August 2020 - 03:58 PM

If true, I stand corrected.  But, currently, here's the Link, direct from Celestron's website, of all the 'Nexstar Evolution' scopes.

 

https://www.celestro...wifi-telescopes



#11 mclewis1

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Posted 13 August 2020 - 06:45 PM

KoolMoeDee, Welcome to CN. You've bought something that most of us here never knew existed. Where did you get it from?

 

Edit: a little research indicates that the Evo 5 appears to be only offered outside of the US (you learn something new everyday ... lol.gif )

 

In terms of what you can see you've gotten some good comments above. If you poke around anything referring to the optics and views with a Celestron C5 SCT will apply to your scope (there's nothing unique about the C5 Celestron puts on the Evolution mount).

 

The Evolution mount is the same as used on the larger models, with only the tripod changing (gets bigger) on the top of the line C925 model. So any of the discussions about the Evolution hardware will apply to your scope.


Edited by mclewis1, 13 August 2020 - 06:49 PM.


#12 gnowellsct

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Posted 13 August 2020 - 08:28 PM

Get this catalog which is only $10 shipped.  In spite of the title it has many deep sky objects and hundreds of double stars that you can see with your scope.

 

Sue French's Celestial Sampler is a selection of her articles.  To write these monthly columns, she explored everything in a 105 mm refractor.  So your 5" will do fine.  The problem is this book is out of print and used copies go for about $40 (and more).    

 

But the Bright Star catalog linked above is a no brainer.  It is a simplified version of the Deep Sky Atlas 2000 which has been referenced.  Everything on the Deep Sky Atlas 2000 is accessible to a 4 inch scope.  But the Bright Star Catalog is 1/10th the price.  It's not just a map it has object lists to go with the maps (making it different from the pocket atlas and the DSA 2000).

 

And if you do get the Deep Sky Atlas Luginbuhl and Skiff's Observing Handbook and Catalog of Deep Sky Objects is a terrific resource, containing descriptions of 3,000 objects (the DSA) with notes about how they appear in apertures from about 60 mm to 30 cm.  


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#13 Gregg Carter

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 09:46 PM

The list of objects visible in your 5" is pretty much limited by your patience, skill and determination as an observer. Patience and determination is inherent in the person, skill comes with practice, combined with the other two attributes.

 

Rather than give you a list, I'll attach a photo of a chart I was using just a couple nights ago with my 6". Note that I've had this 6" since 1985 and have spent countless hours with it under skies of all kinds, and it still thrills me with it's views. I got hooked on astronomy viewing the sky with a 50mm scope, then a 3" and later a 4-1/2" I still have drawing of my "discoveries" from those times in the late 1960s.

 

The photo is of a chart page from Sky and Telescope's Pocket Sky atlas. Atlases like this are typically targeted at owners of a 8" scope. That said, probably over 60% or more of the objects shown, are within the reach of your 5" This is the constellation Cygnus, which lies right overhead this time of the year. I spent nearly two hours in this area lone the other night with my 6". Granted, I was under exceptionally dark skies, but many of the objects are visible in less than ideal circumstances.

 

If you are new to the hobby, and don't have a chart, this chart shows star clusters as yellow circles, nebulae in green, with the round green circles being planetary nebulae. Stars with lines through them are doubles or multiples, stars with numbers preceded with a V are variable. What isn't shown are the millions of fainter background stars in this area of the Milky Way. These background stars can make hunting faint objects a challenge, but often just seeing an eyepiece filled with countless glowing suns is the reward. The star at the tip of the Swan's nose - Albireo is a beautiful and famous showpiece double of blue and gold.

 

I didn't have an observing plan, I just looked at the chart, selected a target and took a look. Some were easy, some invisible, and some were in a field of stars way more beautiful than the target object itself.

 

People think astronomy is a hobby of the eye, but in reality it's a hobby of the mind. Nature holds her treasures tightly in a veil of darkness, and coaxing them free from her grasp is the reward - that is, IF the hobby is for you. Not everyone is thrilled observing faint, barely visible fuzzys, night after night. To me, it's not only the aesthetic view of the object, but knowing it's light came so far to strike my eye. That the barely visible smudge in the eyepiece is 100,000,000,000 stars shining in the past, the light having left their surfaces long before humans looked up and wondered what they are, or even knew of their existence. Sometimes its all about seeing how faint I can go with whatever scope I'm using, and sometimes it IS about the aesthetics of the view, as I slowly sweep the summer Milky Way with a low power eyepiece stumbling upon beautiful sight after beautiful sight. It's seeing a thin sliver of an edge on galaxy, or a face on view of one similar to our own - or two different galaxy types in the same view, one an oval spiral, the other irregular containing a violently erupting core like M81 ans 82 near the Big Dipper. Not far from Cygnus is the large bright planetary nebula M27. Although it's named the Dumbbell, I once heard it called the "Apple Core Nebula" which I found described it's appearance in a small scope much better. This is a view of the Sun's future, when it's running out of fuel and has blown off a lot of it's atmosphere into a glowing bubble, Earth long ago extinguished or if it survived physically, rendered lifeless.

 

You've seen Jupiter and Saturn, but have you watched the Great Red Spot rotate into view? Have you watched Io close in on the limb of the Jupiter, to kiss the edge of the planet, then fade away against the background clouds while it's inky black shadow is projected against the surface nearby? Were you still looking when it reappeared at the other limb and broke free into the blackness of space? Last month I watched as Ganymede ever so slowly slipped into shadow behind the planet, getting fainter and fainter until it was winking in and out of visibility, before vanishing all together. It was spectacular! I equate the movement of these moons as like trying to watch the minute hand on a clock move. Have you sat at the eyepiece looking at the first quarter Moon, patiently watching sunlight strike the peaks and rims of craters, like tiny stars in the shadows, or caught sight of the fleeting Lunar X as the light changed on the Moon's surface? I'm only stating these questions to show that the universe is full of amazing things and every one I've mentioned is within the grasp of your 5".

 

But, you ask, how do I find these things? The first trick is to not get too hung up with the technical stuff. That will come with time. Grab a chart, any chart and find something familiar. The Big Dipper, the W of Cassiopeia or the "Northern Cross" of Cygnus and start exploring. Take the time to really look in the eyepiece, because many objects are hiding in the darkness, and part of the fun, is the thrill (or frustration) of the hunt. Be patient and don't get discouraged. Every year I have a friend that spends an hour at the eyepiece of his 8", just to locate what may be Pluto barely winking in and out of visibility, then again the next night to confirm his observation. He's been observing for over 50 years. If you can find anyone to observe with, and observing buddy can really help- especially if they have some experience that they can share.

 

I hope this helps encourage you to explore and discover why all of us here love the hobby. Always keep in mind every piece of equipment, regardless of size, complexity and cost, has it limitations. The same skills you learn to overcome the limitations of a 5", will serve you well if some day you own a 30" or in reality, when sit down at the console of the world's largest telescope. The universe hold her secrets tight no matter who is looking to find them.

Great post, Tom!

 

"I hope this helps encourage you to explore and discover why all of us here love the hobby."

 

Well, if it doesn't I don't know what would!   bow.gif


Edited by Gregg Carter, 20 July 2021 - 09:48 PM.


#14 vtornado

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 10:07 PM

Find a list of open clusters and double stars.  These are still nice to look at  and easier to find even in urban light pollution.

Next down the list is globular clusters.  Nebula can be viewed with an ultra high contrast filter UHC.  But they will be

shadows of their dark sky self.   Galaxies besides Andromeda really need dark skies.


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#15 Old Man

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 02:56 AM

I have a C5+ model I bought new in 1996, I would not part with it for love nor money. I am visual only with only an occasional DSLR for a moon shot or sun.

 

  I have an 8" SCT, but I still love my 5". Here is a pic of mine sitting out for cool down.

 

 I haven't done any viewing this year, nothing but rain and clouds, now the smoke here in west central Indiana is terrible, all I can do is set and mumble about it.

 

I am sure you will love your 5" just learn how to use it and to collimate it, my 5" is all I had for many years and I learned my way around the sky the hard way, just atlases and no computer

 or internet, and never knew another person to ask for advice. But the thrill is there, if you look for it.

 

  c5+ 2.jpg



#16 Jon_Doh

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 08:04 AM

That's a small, portable package.  Take it to a dark site and you'll see lots of things with it.  If you live under light polluted skies, like so many of us do, then you might consider adding a camera and ZWO's AsiAir and get into EAA.  You'll be able to see things on a tablet or smart phone that you couldn't see otherwise.  Check out the EAA section here.  And congrats on your telescope and welcome to the hobby!



#17 aa6ww

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 03:07 PM

I have both a C5 and C6 and I'm finding myself using the C5 more with my new Az-GTi mount.

Mine is the Orange tube SE XLT model and its just so balanced and perfectly matched to my little Skywatcher mount.

This OTA does not exhibit the diamond ring effect on bright objects like Jupiter as it comes into view at the edge of the field of view. All black tube C6's I've owned have had this issue and I see the black tube C5's have this same issue also.

The 5" aperture is no slouch on messier objects, even in my light polluted back yard skies. Objects I can barely make out in my AT-92 just pop into view in my C5. Of course the C6 is even better at pulling in the Messiers. I will be explore using it with my TV Binoviewer this weekend.

The C5 is a tiny OTA but on my Skywatcher Az-GTi it seems balanced. Precise focusing and sharpness are always a high quality feature of Celestron C5. 

These were also used on the Space Station for some time. Not I think they also have a C9.25 also up there.

 

...Ralph


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#18 treadmarks

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 03:40 PM

Sky and Telescope has a pretty good list of objects that work no matter your light pollution and most of them will work with any scope for that matter. At this time of year you want to be working around RA 18h. I recommend the following objects:

 

M57 Ring nebula

M11 Wild Duck cluster

Albireo (double star)

M13 Hercules cluster



#19 pweiler

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 01:08 PM

Get this catalog which is only $10 shipped. In spite of the title it has many deep sky objects and hundreds of double stars that you can see with your scope.

Sue French's Celestial Sampler is a selection of her articles. To write these monthly columns, she explored everything in a 105 mm refractor. So your 5" will do fine. The problem is this book is out of print and used copies go for about $40 (and more).

But the Bright Star catalog linked above is a no brainer. It is a simplified version of the Deep Sky Atlas 2000 which has been referenced. Everything on the Deep Sky Atlas 2000 is accessible to a 4 inch scope. But the Bright Star Catalog is 1/10th the price. It's not just a map it has object lists to go with the maps (making it different from the pocket atlas and the DSA 2000).

And if you do get the Deep Sky Atlas Luginbuhl and Skiff's Observing Handbook and Catalog of Deep Sky Objects is a terrific resource, containing descriptions of 3,000 objects (the DSA) with notes about how they appear in apertures from about 60 mm to 30 cm.


Is William Bell Inc. still in business and taking new orders?

#20 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 17 August 2021 - 12:22 PM

They sell it with C5. See link below.

 

https://www.celestro...ion-5-telescope

Wow.  I've never heard of or seen an Evolution 5 before.  Maybe it's just not sold in the USA, or was only available for a short time.

 

That being said, Celestron should start offering MCTs as well as SCTs on these mounts.  I was happy to see an MCT added to the AVX lineup.  I'm biased toward MCTs over SCTs though.




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