Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Perseids a dud in 2020?

  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 GamesForOne

GamesForOne

    Apollo

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,252
  • Joined: 29 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Knoxville, TN

Posted 13 August 2020 - 03:38 PM

Did anyone see anywhere near ZHR=100 meteors this year?

 

I spent 2.5 hours up to midnight the evening of the 11th and saw one moderately bright meteor. I have other club members that were out at 2 AM of the 12th and saw none in an hour!

 

I've been looking for aggregated observer reports for this year and can't seem to find anything. If there was a peak it must have been short-lived.

 

---

Michael Mc



#2 Jim Waters

Jim Waters

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,473
  • Joined: 21 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Phoenix, AZ USA

Posted 13 August 2020 - 03:44 PM

I only saw a few but I wasn't at a dark location.



#3 GamesForOne

GamesForOne

    Apollo

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,252
  • Joined: 29 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Knoxville, TN

Posted 13 August 2020 - 03:51 PM

Found this:

 

https://www.imo.net/...r=PER&year=2020

 

Looks like the peak may be coming later than expected. Weather prevented me from trying on the morning of the 13th.

 

---

Michael Mc


  • MCJ2087 likes this

#4 sg6

sg6

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8,835
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2010
  • Loc: Norfolk, UK.

Posted 13 August 2020 - 03:53 PM

Cloud, cloud, cloud.

I seem to have had 1 clear year in 5, and that year not a single meteor.



#5 sunnyday

sunnyday

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10,365
  • Joined: 23 Sep 2019
  • Loc: the Canadian nebula .

Posted 13 August 2020 - 03:54 PM

this is how many I saw, 0 + 0 = 0



#6 NorthernlatAK

NorthernlatAK

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,040
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2018

Posted 13 August 2020 - 03:56 PM

I saw meteors last night in small bursts. As soon as I walked outside I saw about a 0 magnitude meteor followed by five faint ones within 5 minutes. Most left a trail that lasted about 1 or 2 seconds. Then I didn't see one for about ten minutes. Every time I did see one, it was followed by a few more. I also saw some extremely faint ones (about mag 5 or 6) that were more frequent. I know I missed a bunch as I was observing through my scopes, mainly Mars and a handful of dso's. I probably saw about 20 in an hour but I know there were many more I missed. I was observing from South Central Alaska. It was quite a magical night as it was the first clear dark night that we've had since we've started to get dark at night again.

#7 StarBurger

StarBurger

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 578
  • Joined: 06 Mar 2018
  • Loc: North Country NY

Posted 13 August 2020 - 04:01 PM

For me the Perseids have been a dud for many seasons. I don't even bother to go out and try.

My last big year must have been around 1985 when my astro club went out with about 10 members sitting in chairs in a circle with me recording and timing on an early paleolithic laptop the announcements of "PERSEID" "SPORADIC" "ERR-DON"T KNOW". This was in a good dark site, no moon and perfect skies.

We racked up some 90 meteors/ZHR.

Since then...well.

Only three weeks ago, long before the peak I was sitting out with a friend and we saw at least 5 per hour of non-Perseids, probably from a couple of the lesser streams active at that time.

I'll leave it to the radio meteor observers to fill in the holes in meteor detection. 


  • GamesForOne likes this

#8 johnoelliott

johnoelliott

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 213
  • Joined: 14 Nov 2015
  • Loc: Toronto Ontario

Posted 13 August 2020 - 04:01 PM

I was wondering if it was just me.

 

I think this years "show" was the worst I've experienced under clear skies since I first started watching it many years ago!.

 

From about 11PM until around 4AM I saw a total of 12 and the brightest of them wasn't even a Persied.

 

Up until this past event, the worst count I've had from within the city was 75 over the evening a few years ago.

 

I had my ASI camera connected to me 24mm Canon lens tracking the area between Cassiopeia and Andromeda for the entire 5 hours and only captured a single dim meteor! 



#9 GamesForOne

GamesForOne

    Apollo

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,252
  • Joined: 29 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Knoxville, TN

Posted 13 August 2020 - 04:09 PM

I was wondering if it was just me.

 

I think this years "show" was the worst I've experienced under clear skies since I first started watching it many years ago!.

 

From about 11PM until around 4AM I saw a total of 12 and the brightest of them wasn't even a Persied.

 

Up until this past event, the worst count I've had from within the city was 75 over the evening a few years ago.

 

I had my ASI camera connected to me 24mm Canon lens tracking the area between Cassiopeia and Andromeda for the entire 5 hours and only captured a single dim meteor! 

No it was not just you! Was your outing the evening of the 11th or 12th? The evening of the 11th and morning of the 12th seemed very slow in the eastern USA.

 

I routinely used to count 60-70 meteors in 2 hours of observing from several different suburban locations in the 70's, 80's, and early/mid 90's with some 30-50% appearing quite bright. It seems like the average brightness of the Perseid's has been steadily decreasing over the last several years and/or the level of light pollution is increasing and I just have not noticed how bad it has become.

 

---

Michael Mc



#10 Mike G.

Mike G.

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,973
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2013
  • Loc: Oberlin, Ohio

Posted 13 August 2020 - 04:11 PM

last night I saw 4 over the course of 2.5 hours, with 3 of them within 30 minutes of each other.  one was really great.  the night before my wife saw 3, I saw 1 small one. sunday night we were out and my wife saw 5, I saw 3 and the first one we both saw was the second brighteest I have seen in my life, it was a massive fireball that extended about 35-40 degrees before extinguishing.  beautiful!

all 3 nights have been semi-cloudy, sometimes more, sometimes less.  but for me, it's been a better perseids than usual.



#11 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 93,229
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 13 August 2020 - 10:08 PM

I logged only 7 meteors in approximately 3 hours on Tuesday night.  My session was actually almost exactly 4 hours long (10:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. EDT) but clouds covered most of the sky for an extended period and I took a few breaks to do some binocular observing.  There were two fairly bright meteors.  One was about magnitude -1 and the other about magnitude -2.  My wife and I were observing from the Bortle 6 Naylor Observatory.



#12 phillip

phillip

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 950
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2005
  • Loc: Sterling, Illinois

Posted 14 August 2020 - 12:20 AM

Wow I'm not missing much as failed to observe this year.

 

Have viewed one in 5 to 10 min in the past. Even Found that rare.

 

Course missed a biggie around decade or more as my manager was seeing after 3 AM things rain from the sky with activity. Believe the verified count was over 300 per hour. Lordy! 

 

Perhaps next Year?

 

Clear Sky



#13 NorthernlatAK

NorthernlatAK

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,040
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2018

Posted 14 August 2020 - 01:02 AM

Seems these showers depend on where you are on earth along with needing a dark sky. I'd say this was my 2nd best Perseid shower considering I wasn't concentrating too hard to see them as I was mostly observing through scopes. Most previous displays I witnessed were fairly dull in comparison.
My most memorable Perseid shower was in 1999, my first permanent year in Alaska. Along with close to 100 per hour with several -2 mags, there was a stunning aurora display with green, pink, red, and blue colors that night along with a STEVE which were thought to just be aurora at that time. I just stood there spinning slowly with my jaw literally agape soaking it all in. I will always remember that night, it was the 12th/13th of August 1999.
  • EverlastingSky and Mike G. like this

#14 therealsuperdave

therealsuperdave

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 7
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2020
  • Loc: Tyler, TX

Posted 14 August 2020 - 07:32 AM

I counted 7 this morning between 4 and 6 am from Tyler, TX.



#15 Voyager 3

Voyager 3

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 319
  • Joined: 20 Jul 2020
  • Loc: Near Bangalore, India

Posted 14 August 2020 - 09:06 AM

0 as clouds didn't allow me to even see -2 mag Jupiter

#16 BrooksObs

BrooksObs

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,194
  • Joined: 08 Dec 2012

Posted 14 August 2020 - 10:09 AM

This year was no dud, but was hampered by moonlight and for many, increasing light pollution. Appreciate that shower rates have simply more or less returned to to their historical levels now and will likely remain so for the rest of our lives. During the 20th century annual predictions only called for ZHRs rates of 60 per hour (and remember ZHR s are not observed rates), not the fictional 150 rates often posted in recent years. Even the 60 ZHR requires very good, dark skies with no moon whatever, or obstruction of your view.. The ZHRs reported during the late 1980's and early 1990's were only a result of the perihelion passage of the shower's parent comet. Such elevated rates aren't likely to be seen again until early in the 22nd century!

 

BrooksObs


Edited by BrooksObs, 14 August 2020 - 10:45 AM.

  • smithrrlyr likes this

#17 GamesForOne

GamesForOne

    Apollo

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,252
  • Joined: 29 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Knoxville, TN

Posted 14 August 2020 - 03:21 PM

This year was no dud, but was hampered by moonlight and for many, increasing light pollution. Appreciate that shower rates have simply more or less returned to to their historical levels now and will likely remain so for the rest of our lives. During the 20th century annual predictions only called for ZHRs rates of 60 per hour (and remember ZHR s are not observed rates), not the fictional 150 rates often posted in recent years. Even the 60 ZHR requires very good, dark skies with no moon whatever, or obstruction of your view.. The ZHRs reported during the late 1980's and early 1990's were only a result of the perihelion passage of the shower's parent comet. Such elevated rates aren't likely to be seen again until early in the 22nd century!

 

BrooksObs

The percentage of bright meteors seems certainly to have decreased from the 80's and 90's. I see plots of data on rates, but not many of average brightness.

 

Thanks for the info -- people involved in outreach may need to cool the jets on promoting the Perseids to the public unless they go to dark sky locations. Very few seem observable from urban and even suburban areas. Continuing to promote the Perseids is setting up the public for disappointment. I think I personally will cool on making this an annual observing event as I have had several years of relatively low count of late.

 

I guess that leaves the Geminids. coldday.gif

 

---

Michael Mc



#18 HeavensAbove

HeavensAbove

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 14
  • Joined: 13 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Sheboygan Falls, WI

Posted 14 August 2020 - 05:35 PM

From Western shores of Lake Michigan, Wisconsin,

 

I've been out the past few nights (Aug 10-13th).  Typically around 11:00 to 1:00 a.m.  Different times per dates etc..  Seen a few bright orange streaks, and then the occasional white flash, less then 1 per 20 mins.

 

But the orange flashes got my attention.



#19 MCJ2087

MCJ2087

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 39
  • Joined: 04 Feb 2019

Posted 14 August 2020 - 07:18 PM

Found this:

 

https://www.imo.net/...r=PER&year=2020

 

Looks like the peak may be coming later than expected. Weather prevented me from trying on the morning of the 13th.

 

---

Michael Mc

Thanks for that link, hadn’t heard much about observations.  This was my first real attempt to observe the Perseids.  My counts were (all times central daylight time):

 

8/10/2020 – 12 from 10:05pm to 11:10pm, 6 from 11:10pm to 12:10am on 8/11, stopped around Moonrise
8/11/2020 – 11 from 10:15pm to 11:15pm, then clouds
8/12/2020 – 29 from 1:30am to 2:30am, some glare from the 44% waning Moon
8/13/2020 – No visual counts, just experimented with ZWO 224MC with the kit supplied 2.1mm fisheye lens - on a manual tripod.  Started at 10:30pm with variable cloud cover, heavy cloud cover by 11:15pm.  Will probably try to use that setup again when the weather clears, and later for the Geminids. 

 

All observations were looking East at about 75 degrees.  The best fireball was seen 8/10/2020 at about 10:10pm, thick ion trail.  Had just started the first session, and was not positioned to see the full north to south sky, lost track of it right after the flash.  From northcentral Minnesota.
 


  • dhkaiser likes this

#20 smithrrlyr

smithrrlyr

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 169
  • Joined: 05 Feb 2017
  • Loc: Michigan

Posted 15 August 2020 - 12:57 AM

This year was no dud, but was hampered by moonlight and for many, increasing light pollution. Appreciate that shower rates have simply more or less returned to to their historical levels now and will likely remain so for the rest of our lives. During the 20th century annual predictions only called for ZHRs rates of 60 per hour (and remember ZHR s are not observed rates), not the fictional 150 rates often posted in recent years. Even the 60 ZHR requires very good, dark skies with no moon whatever, or obstruction of your view.. The ZHRs reported during the late 1980's and early 1990's were only a result of the perihelion passage of the shower's parent comet. Such elevated rates aren't likely to be seen again until early in the 22nd century!

 

BrooksObs

The 2020 Perseids seemed comparable to those I saw in the 1960s, according to my notes from those bygone years.  They did not appear particularly faint to me this year, with the brightest in a couple hours of observing being one of mag -2 and one of mag -3.  My observations appear consistent with BrooksObs's comment.



#21 NorthernlatAK

NorthernlatAK

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,040
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2018

Posted 15 August 2020 - 06:20 AM

The shower continues but at a much reduced rate from a couple nights ago. once again I was actually observing through my scope at some DSOs tonight and I bagged 7, all perseids in an hour and a half. The brightest was a yellowish mag 0 and streaked through cygnus in the brightest part of the milky way from close to deneb and past albeiro. I was lining the scope up to m27 so it was right smack in my center of vision. Not too shabby for post peak. That region of sky is close to bortle 4 where I am.

#22 cpl43uk

cpl43uk

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 416
  • Joined: 09 Feb 2008
  • Loc: Bristol, UK

Posted 16 August 2020 - 02:19 PM

Managed a few and sketched their tracks but must have been off on a couple vs the radiant.. 
 
9A20D1B3-6CDF-4957-95BD-6235F131BC88.png


  • Dave Mitsky, ssmith, smithrrlyr and 1 other like this

#23 smithrrlyr

smithrrlyr

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 169
  • Joined: 05 Feb 2017
  • Loc: Michigan

Posted 18 August 2020 - 12:48 PM

Managed a few and sketched their tracks but must have been off on a couple vs the radiant.. 
 

Of course, not all meteors near the radiant have to be Perseids, so your directions even on the discrepant trails may have been correct.




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics