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A mighty little 8x30 !

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#1 paulsky

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 09:12 AM

Hello

The other day, during the whole day they let me use a small binocular, the Nikon EII 8x30, we were in the field, hiking, the day was dry and sunny with very good light, here the Nikon was in all its sauce, bright, The images were very, very contrasted and sharp, especially in the center of the image, towards the edge the thing does not go too, for example the images of the feathers of the birds are beautiful, with an unusual definition, it has a Very extensive field, about 8.8º if I remember correctly, the landscape vision is very good, very bright despite being an 8x30 ...
I have medium-sized hands, not very big and even so it is not easy to take this little one in your hands, there is a need for more binoculars to fill the hands ..., the mechanics in this binocular seem excellent, the focus wheel like butter , it is full of quality, although it is a pity that it is not waterproof, it may fog up a lot in colder weather ...
I have found a very good binocular for bird or insect and flower observation, with a spectacular image ... but only in good weather.
During the night the image so contrasted that it provides I liked more than the other two binoculars I had there, a 10x50 and a 12x36 IS, although with 8X it did not have as much penetration as they for example for deep sky observation, to show a button: Double cluster of Perseus, greater contrast with 8x30, greater number of stars with 10x50, greater penetration with 12x36 ..
Now, with those 8.8º the Nikon "fractured" the images of the other two in terms of wide field, what a joy to walk with them on the Milky Way .. !!

Best regards
Paul.


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#2 drt3d

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 09:22 AM

Too bad you cannot buy this any more, other than ebay for $600+ imported from Japan.



#3 Grimnir

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 10:19 AM

 it may fog up a lot in colder weather ...
 

Not in my experience.

 

Graham


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#4 Pinewood

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 05:19 PM

Hello Paul,

 

I had one and enjoyed it, even with its limited eye relief.  However, I have become clumsy in my old age and decided on using a more robust 8x32. 

 

Stay safe,

Arthur Pinewood



#5 Albie

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Posted 25 August 2020 - 07:11 AM

Not in my experience.

 

Graham

Same here.


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#6 Albie

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Posted 25 August 2020 - 07:25 AM

Too bad you cannot buy this any more, other than ebay for $600+ imported from Japan.

It would have been nice to have bought mine locally  for warranty reasons   however buying from Japan was quick and painless .  They are a well made binocular and should give many years of trouble-free viewing  unless you are hard on your gear or extremely clumsy . Even if you have a mishap  there are two guys in the states that would be more than happy to remedy your problem.



#7 WALL.E

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Posted 25 August 2020 - 09:30 AM

Hi Paul,

 

I'm definitely on the 8X30 "band wagon".

I have 8X30's, but the only fair comparison I have for the EII is my Celestron Ultima 8X32.

 

I know, 2mm difference. Can we consider this minutiae?

I don't want to be challenged with "pistols at twenty paces" over it.

(Some members are extremely discerning and particular in such matters). And rightly so at critical moments.

I proceed with an innocent spirit.

 

I have found similarities with your viewing experience as far as images are concerned.

 

I have relatively large hands but I find that the Ultima and similar sizes just "slip" in perfectly. It seems to me there's "just enough" binocular.

There is much to admire in their "petite" quality.wub.png

While the entire binocular body is completely covered by my hands, I am left with more than ample dexterity to extend my index fingers against my forehead in the "teepee", or "pyramid" fashion.

Employing this method allows me extremely steady views. As steady as any I can account for.

I have several vintage Superwide 7X50's with that huge exit pupil and they are great for stability.

Good, solid, "beefy" optics that settle nicely with your hands under the barrels.

But we're talking about entirely different creatures there.

 

My 11* 7X50 is about as light as a paving stone and you certainly can't fit it into a jacket pocket.

The Ultima 8X32 is 8.3* but has excellent eye relief, glasses or not. Field is about 90% sharp. Really sharp.

It can hang around your neck all day without discomfort. Superb images day or night.

 

---BEARING IN MIND THE LIMITATIONS OF DESIGN AND DIMENSIONS---

 

I think a GOOD 8X30 (ish) binocular has a great deal to offer.

They seem to do a little of everything pretty well. Some things in a rather spectacular manner.

I have discovered many attributes which make such a configuration highly desirable.

 

I have viewed through a Nikon SE 8X32, but have never had the privilege of seeing through an EII.

Based on the EII's reputation, I'm sure they're everything they should be.

 

I wish you great success if you seek an 8X30 EII for yourself.

Excellent Porros seem to be going "bye, bye" now days.

(If somebody offered me $500 cash for my Ultima 8X32, I would politely decline).

 

\\ // /

 

Eric


Edited by WALL.E, 25 August 2020 - 09:35 AM.


#8 paulsky

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Posted 25 August 2020 - 09:45 AM

It is one of its weak points in my opinion, I see it quite delicate, perhaps a good little one for the backyard but not for a whole day of observation on roads, trails and wet maritime environments

On the other hand, I lack a binocular (I mean "binocular mass") to fill my hands ... it is a bit uncomfortable to hold them in my hands ..

Cheers,



#9 PEterW

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Posted 25 August 2020 - 10:27 AM

.... my daytime binocular, but Once after an afternoon walking around hills in crisp weather and coming into a warm pub for a well earned rest they did fog up. Only time I’ve seen this though. They can fit in a pocket or easy to carry with the strap wrapped round a wrist.

Peter

#10 BRCoz

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Posted 25 August 2020 - 07:36 PM

A few years ago I wanted a small bino to use and went with Sightron SIIBL832 8x32.  Very nice and did't cost too much.  


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#11 DeanD

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Posted 26 August 2020 - 01:43 AM

They sound great: I would love to be able to compare them with my Swaro Habicht 8x30's. Wonderful views, super sharp in the centre, and amazing contrast at night: the first time I had clearly seen Barnard's Loop in Orion, and extended nebulosity around the LMC. I think this is an under-rated size for wide-field astro.

 

Enjoy!

 

- Dean


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#12 paulsky

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Posted 30 October 2020 - 10:57 AM

Wow, the Barnard's Loop in Orion with one 8x30 binocular..!!!

Cheers,

Paul.


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#13 Cestus

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Posted 30 October 2020 - 12:18 PM

I have the 8x32 Diamondback HD from Vortex. I got it for travel and hiking. I wanted something that I could use both day and night that was very light. Unfortunately due to the pandemic I was unable to take my trip, so I have just used it for backyard viewing. It actually works pretty nicely.


Edited by Cestus, 30 October 2020 - 12:19 PM.


#14 PEterW

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Posted 30 October 2020 - 02:08 PM

Barnards loop is HUGE, even at unity viewing its big, most wide binoculars you need to pan around.
Peter
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#15 DeanD

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Posted 30 October 2020 - 06:34 PM

Wow, the Barnard's Loop in Orion with one 8x30 binocular..!!!

Cheers,

Paul.

A nice dark sky helps too! SQM~ 21.8 at the time.  :)


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#16 litesong

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Posted 16 November 2020 - 12:43 AM

Eric wrote:

I have 8X30's, but the only fair comparison I have for the EII is my Celestron Ultima 8X32.

I know, 2mm difference. Can we consider this minutiae?

///////

We can consider the 32mm lens compared to the 30mm lens, as giving 13.8percent more light.cool.gif

I’ll take the extra light. You can have the lesser light, because its minutiae. Thank you very much.shocked.gif


Edited by litesong, 16 November 2020 - 12:45 AM.


#17 Gastrol

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Posted 17 November 2020 - 01:11 AM

I find my Fujinon Meibo 8x30’s to be just right for astro use.


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#18 litesong

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Posted 17 November 2020 - 07:55 AM

I find my Fujinon Meibo 8x30’s to be just right for astro use.

Its good to know that my 8x36mm Nikon’s are just right for astro use & beat my Celestron 11x80mm & 20x80mm binoculars. In the garbage go the big ones.


Edited by litesong, 17 November 2020 - 08:01 AM.


#19 gwlee

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Posted 23 November 2020 - 11:05 AM

I have an 8x32, 8x42, and 7x50. The 8x32 works surprisingly well for astronomy, but the 8x42 works better, and the 7x50 works even better.

The 8x32 is my hiking binocular. It bests the others for long days in the mountains, and I would choose it for a overnight hiking trip that includes stargazing.

The 8x42 is my first choice for astronomy travel to remote wilderness sites where daytime critter watching is available.

The 7x50 is a dedicated astronomy binocular for use at home. It’s also useful for long range terrestrial viewing from home, but otherwise handicapped because it lacks central focus.
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#20 WALL.E

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Posted 26 November 2020 - 10:21 AM

OK Paul. I'm blaming you.

Now I have another binocular.

You got me on this little 8X30 "kick".

 

And what a neat little binocular!

The Tasco model 320. JB191. 460/1000, = 8.8* or 8.9*?

 

An old review in the Bird Forum called this little instrument, "the poor man's 8X30E" (Nikon of course).

Martin Pond has an archived post in which he expressed high regard.

I concur. I think Tasco did an excellent job in contracting this one.

 

What a nice surprise!

This little fellow feels stout and solid.

Images are bright, very clear, and wide.

The focus mechanism is very slightly stiff but highly accurate.

I am able to unscrew the plastic eye cups to enjoy the full field.

 

It certainly does not surpass my cherished real Celestron Ultima 8X32, but it does exceed a Baigish 8X30 with a most decisive "knockout" blow.

I am impressed almost to astonishment when I consider what I paid for the model 320!

I truly feel I am looking through a much more expensive binocular.

 

Always more to learn and experience.

 

Happy Holiday to all my friends,

 

Eric


Edited by WALL.E, 27 November 2020 - 03:35 AM.

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#21 scrane

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Posted 04 December 2020 - 09:30 AM

I have always loved the 8x30 Porro prism format. I have a Nikon E, a Nikon Superior E 8x32, an old Meibo, and a newer Fujinon FMTR-SX. The Fujinon and the Superior E are my favorites. All of the 8x30s are easy to carry and provide effortless viewing.

 

In Roofs I have an older pair of Trinovid 8x32 BN and an off topic 8x20 BCA compact. Continuing off topic is a funky pair of Russian Military 7x30s.

 

Unfortunately I have developed an eye condition that has made superimposing left and right images very difficult. :( . Oh well.


Edited by scrane, 04 December 2020 - 09:45 AM.

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#22 WALL.E

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Posted 11 December 2020 - 09:46 AM

I made an interesting discovery.

 

In post #20 in this thread I "gushed" praise upon a Tasco model 320 8X30.

I still mean every word. At least regarding THAT Tasco 320.

 

I was so impressed with the model 320 that I hastily purchased another for a Christmas gift.

I was promptly shipped a well packed Tasco model 320 8X30.

 

It is not the same binocular!

 

The first one I received is a JB191.  The second one is JB250.

I cannot "condemn" this little binocular. (JB250).

But it is everything you would expect from an inexpensive binocular of that era. (Unlike my finding with the JB191).

 

The body (minus objective barrels and eyepieces) is 6-7mm's shorter than the JB191.

The body (prism housings) is very noticeably smaller in diameter.

The eye cups are fold down rubber, not the hard plastic rings.

The images are good to mediocre, but slightly dimmer it seems to me.

The focus mechanism is much more "wobbly", the images sort of "mush" into focus.

 

It is definitely a different binocular.  "Naughty, naughty Tasco!"

But that's just "business".

 

What I've experienced reminds me of of the mixed opinions I've heard about the various Sans&Streiffe 8X30's.

 

My conscience (ego to a small degree), calls on me to mention this as I would never knowingly deceive any members here.

Someone may have had experience with a model 320, and thought, "that guy's nuts, this is nothing special".

Just because I say it's a really nice binocular doesn't just "make it so". I now know that there are at least two different binoculars wearing this same model number.

 

That is not uncommon for re-branded Japanese contract binoculars.

What I'm describing here is perfectly evidenced by my much revered duo of EMPIRE model 250 7X50 10* binoculars.

One is JB191, the other is JB146. Both are excellent, but I would give a 2% edge to the optics of the JB191.

But they are essentially the same binocular in every way.

 

This is simply the first time I've seen it where it's just a totally different binocular in specification and performance.

 

Wiser,

 

Eric

 

 

 

 


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#23 Mbinoc

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Posted 11 December 2020 - 11:42 AM

As of last night I now have two sets of in-expensive 8x30 binoculars.

 

There is a thrift store a few blocks down from my house that has been there for over 12 years or at least as long as I have lived in the area. Do to the pandemic, they could not make rent, and are now closing. There was a sign in the store that said "Clearance, Everything must go". I stopped in last night after seeing the sign, and picked up a set of Daylight branded Binoculars for $5.99.

 

1.JPG

 

2.JPG

 

In the photos one is a Japan made Atcomar J-E8 "Diamond COC" marked set,  and the other is a Japan "Daylight" branded J-E36 set. They appear identical, other than the factory markings, and the parts are interchangeable The only difference I can see is when looked at from a distance the Atcomar eye pieces have a slight blue tint, and the eye pieces in the Daylight set do not.

 

In limited backyard tests today the "Daylight" branded set seems to be sharper, and are pretty impressive for what they are. Before purchasing them, I asked if I could try them out looking out the front door, and focused in on a distant power line pole. After they past that test I brought them home.

 

After more testing, one of the two sets will be put up for sale.

 

I also picked up a D cell maglight for $3 that I'm trying to save. The previous batteries are corroded and stuck. Call me old fashioned, but I still like there USA made build quality. A while back on ebay I inexpensively purchased a lot of 5 led bulbs that fit these, and have upgraded a few of them now to more modern led bulbs.

 

6.JPG

 

I leave them laying around the house in various rooms, and use them all the time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

.


Edited by Mbinoc, 11 December 2020 - 12:31 PM.

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#24 KennyJ

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Posted 11 December 2020 - 02:24 PM

Touching upon Eric's point about thee being (at least) two very different versions of binoculars with the same model name and number, I was wondering if this could also be the case with the Greenkat wide angle 10x50?

 

I've noticed one or two members mention them almost as if some kind of "holy grail", but must confess that of three specimens I've seen and held over time after seeing them for sale in second hand shops and "car boot" sales, have all laid serious claims to being the worst binoculars I've ever tried, both optically and mechanically.

 

Kenny


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#25 WALL.E

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Posted 12 December 2020 - 06:39 AM

A little more "investigation".

 

Regarding the Tasco model 320 8X30, I fear I must squelch my support down to, "well, I was lucky and won the lottery this time".

 

I actually attempted to locate all the photos I could of said binocular (including ebay) to try and find any consistency in the JB markings and general build of individual units. Even using a 4 inch magnifying glass against the computer screen.

 

Obviously I already possess a JB191 (Terrific), and a JB250 (Very average).

I found one model 320 that looked just like the JB191, it was JB230.

Finding these JB numbers from the right vantage point was really difficult, but I was able to get an "angle" on TWO others that did not appear to be the same JB numbers as any of the previous three!

I could not positively identify exactly what the other numbers were.

 

Faith in the integrity of the 320 model is pretty much shattered here.

 

Shucks, I hope that's not where Tasco picked up the Moniker for their "International" series.

"Yup, we call 'em International 'cause they're made EVERYWHERE".

No offense intended, I have little experience with Tasco instruments.

 

I will keep my excellent (and lucky) JB191.

 

Eric

 




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