Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

CFF 200mm F6.5 - Visual First Light

  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 drprovi57

drprovi57

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Virgina USA

Posted 27 August 2020 - 08:36 PM

I got a break last night from clouds and I was able to perform visual first-light with the new CFF 200mm F6.5 refractor.  Bottom-line:  WOW!   I was able to observe the half moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and some DSO’s.  My last large refractor was a TMB APO 178mm F8 LZOS - was a great instrument, unfortunately I sold it 10 years ago - with great regret.  I have added many superb instruments since then, where I focused on DSO imaging.  As I think about retirement, I decided I wanted a large 200mm refractor with a short focal length.  CFF delivered an excellent 200mm F6.5 refractor and surprisingly out performing my TMB 178 on the planets.

 

I purchased the CFF 200 primarily for DSO imaging - but I also wanted to do some planetary imaging and occasional visual use for outreach (after COVID-19) with local high schools. 

 

Anyway, back to the visual first light initial observations.  I am not an expert visual observer, but I have used enough instruments to appreciate the performance of the CFF 200.  My first target was a +2 magnitude star to perform a quick star test.  Atmospheric conditions cooperated with a lovely in-focus star image displaying a nearly perfect diffraction pattern.  I was pleasantly surprised to see no chromatic aberration for a fast F6.5 scope - I was using a 4mm TMB Planetary eyepiece and a Vernonscope 2” 1/20th wave quartz star diagonal giving a magnification of 325x.

 

I then turned to half moon - I used several different eyepieces (Televue 24mm Panoptic, 9mm Ethos, and 4mm TMB) - the craters were “tac” sharp with much detail.  What really amazed me was the contrast - especially the shadows being very sharp.  It was fun just flying over the moon surface at 325x magnification.  Bad news - I will need now to make another investment into a binoviewer 😊.

 

Next target was Jupiter - the planet showed considerable cloud details and using the 4mm TMB even the moons showed some detail.  Again the high contrast level of detail was clearly evident.  Unfortunately, no “great red spot” visible at the this time.

I then turned to Saturn - again a very sharp and contrasty detail of Saturn’s clouds and the rings were tac sharp.  Since Saturn takes magnification well I added a 2X Barlow to 4mm TMB eyepiece to see how well the CFF 200 takes magnification (650x) - there was little break down of Saturn - a real testament of the optical design.

 

Clouds were beginning to roll in so I decided to look at a few DSOs: M57 and then M13.  M13 was stunningly resolved in my 24mm Panaoptic.  The field of view using the 22mm Panoptic was around 1.3 degrees providing a great rich-star-field experience.  I hope to try some double stars in the future as well - stay tuned.

In all I am very satisfied with the CFF200 as a great visual scope.  If the weather cooperates this weekend I hope to take some first-light images using my ZWO ASI2600 (APS-C) camera with the supplied CFF 200 field flattener.  I also have a FL PL11002 CCD (Full Frame) camera for future testing as well.

 

Jason


  • Paul G, zjc26138, Alterf and 24 others like this

#2 Neptune

Neptune

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,380
  • Joined: 16 Apr 2007
  • Loc: Georgia

Posted 27 August 2020 - 09:09 PM

Pictures!



#3 Jeff B

Jeff B

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7,042
  • Joined: 30 Dec 2006

Posted 27 August 2020 - 09:30 PM

I got a break last night from clouds and I was able to perform visual first-light with the new CFF 200mm F6.5 refractor.  Bottom-line:  WOW!   I was able to observe the half moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and some DSO’s.  My last large refractor was a TMB APO 178mm F8 LZOS - was a great instrument, unfortunately I sold it 10 years ago - with great regret.  I have added many superb instruments since then, where I focused on DSO imaging.  As I think about retirement, I decided I wanted a large 200mm refractor with a short focal length.  CFF delivered an excellent 200mm F6.5 refractor and surprisingly out performing my TMB 178 on the planets.

 

I purchased the CFF 200 primarily for DSO imaging - but I also wanted to do some planetary imaging and occasional visual use for outreach (after COVID-19) with local high schools. 

 

Anyway, back to the visual first light initial observations.  I am not an expert visual observer, but I have used enough instruments to appreciate the performance of the CFF 200.  My first target was a +2 magnitude star to perform a quick star test.  Atmospheric conditions cooperated with a lovely in-focus star image displaying a nearly perfect diffraction pattern.  I was pleasantly surprised to see no chromatic aberration for a fast F6.5 scope - I was using a 4mm TMB Planetary eyepiece and a Vernonscope 2” 1/20th wave quartz star diagonal giving a magnification of 325x.

 

I then turned to half moon - I used several different eyepieces (Televue 24mm Panoptic, 9mm Ethos, and 4mm TMB) - the craters were “tac” sharp with much detail.  What really amazed me was the contrast - especially the shadows being very sharp.  It was fun just flying over the moon surface at 325x magnification.  Bad news - I will need now to make another investment into a binoviewer .

 

Next target was Jupiter - the planet showed considerable cloud details and using the 4mm TMB even the moons showed some detail.  Again the high contrast level of detail was clearly evident.  Unfortunately, no “great red spot” visible at the this time.

I then turned to Saturn - again a very sharp and contrasty detail of Saturn’s clouds and the rings were tac sharp.  Since Saturn takes magnification well I added a 2X Barlow to 4mm TMB eyepiece to see how well the CFF 200 takes magnification (650x) - there was little break down of Saturn - a real testament of the optical design.

 

Clouds were beginning to roll in so I decided to look at a few DSOs: M57 and then M13.  M13 was stunningly resolved in my 24mm Panaoptic.  The field of view using the 22mm Panoptic was around 1.3 degrees providing a great rich-star-field experience.  I hope to try some double stars in the future as well - stay tuned.

In all I am very satisfied with the CFF200 as a great visual scope.  If the weather cooperates this weekend I hope to take some first-light images using my ZWO ASI2600 (APS-C) camera with the supplied CFF 200 field flattener.  I also have a FL PL11002 CCD (Full Frame) camera for future testing as well.

 

Jason

Jason, a very nice report.  Big APO's are just such satisfying instruments, especially when permanently mounted.  Big, bright images with easy, sublime detail. 

 

I have a CFF 160 F6.5.  I have termed this instrument a "scope in search of a good bino-viewer" not just because it is "bino-friendly", but also because it is very picky as to what comes after the objective. 

 

After many hours and months of trying out many of the high end viewers, I finally found the perfect match ups (yes, plural viewers).  For low power, I found the Baader Mark V and, especially, the Zeiss 30 mm clear aperture viewer sometimes sold by Denis Levatic.  With its big aperture, the Zeiss allows full use of eyepiece pairs like the TV 24mm Pans, older 35mm and 30 Ultimas, and my favorites, the APM 24mm UFF's, without any vignetting or darkening at the edges of the FOV.  One look at M31, M42, M11, the double cluster, and the other usual suspects, in bino-vision is all you need to knock you out.  

 

For high power viewing of solar system objects and doubles, I found the Zeiss "sharpest" that Denis also sells, combined with the Baader 1.25X and 1.7X GPC's, to be outstanding with these big, fast, APOs.  This viewer uses mirrors after the beam splitter.  I found this configuration viewer has very, very little color and spherical disturbances compared to other viewers at very high power.  Just superb.

 

Enjoy!!

 

Jeff


Edited by Jeff B, 27 August 2020 - 09:32 PM.

  • RogerLaureys, Astrojensen, denis0007dl and 1 other like this

#4 gnowellsct

gnowellsct

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 17,847
  • Joined: 24 Jun 2009

Posted 27 August 2020 - 10:58 PM

My 92 mm CFF f/6.9 is full of surprises in what it can do....and also what it can't do.  Sometimes 3.6 inches is just 3.6 inches.



#5 RogerLaureys

RogerLaureys

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 177
  • Joined: 02 Feb 2005
  • Loc: Hasselt,Belgium

Posted 27 August 2020 - 11:05 PM

Jason, a very nice report.  Big APO's are just such satisfying instruments, especially when permanently mounted.  Big, bright images with easy, sublime detail. 

 

I have a CFF 160 F6.5.  I have termed this instrument a "scope in search of a good bino-viewer" not just because it is "bino-friendly", but also because it is very picky as to what comes after the objective. 

 

After many hours and months of trying out many of the high end viewers, I finally found the perfect match ups (yes, plural viewers).  For low power, I found the Baader Mark V and, especially, the Zeiss 30 mm clear aperture viewer sometimes sold by Denis Levatic.  With its big aperture, the Zeiss allows full use of eyepiece pairs like the TV 24mm Pans, older 35mm and 30 Ultimas, and my favorites, the APM 24mm UFF's, without any vignetting or darkening at the edges of the FOV.  One look at M31, M42, M11, the double cluster, and the other usual suspects, in bino-vision is all you need to knock you out.  

 

For high power viewing of solar system objects and doubles, I found the Zeiss "sharpest" that Denis also sells, combined with the Baader 1.25X and 1.7X GPC's, to be outstanding with these big, fast, APOs.  This viewer uses mirrors after the beam splitter.  I found this configuration viewer has very, very little color and spherical disturbances compared to other viewers at very high power.  Just superb.

 

Enjoy!!

 

Jeff

I  totally agree with Jeff's findings !!!



#6 nicknacknock

nicknacknock

    A man of many qualities, even if they are mostly bad ones

  • *****
  • Administrators
  • Posts: 14,278
  • Joined: 20 Feb 2012
  • Loc: Nicosia, Cyprus

Posted 28 August 2020 - 12:10 AM

Jason, 

 

What annoys me about this thread is that you are posting some great stuff, but you are not including eye candy. If you think that anyone will get bored with photos of the CFF, you are wrong my friend.

 

Now, get me my drug of choice by posting some photos of that scope!


  • 3 i Guy, eros312, dcornelis and 1 other like this

#7 fate187

fate187

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 447
  • Joined: 16 May 2015
  • Loc: Saxony, Germany

Posted 28 August 2020 - 12:57 AM

Yepp, we need more pictures :D. And I agree with Jeff B. Look for the high quality binos like Zeiss apo bino for planets.

Just like you I bought the instrument for imaging and occasional viewing. As it turned out, I almost exclusively used it for viewing :D. As an imaging instrument it works well without flattener with smaller chips (Atik 460 camera here). But I am also thinking of making the jump to CMOS and an IMX 571 chip. I just have to decide to go color or wait for mono. Take a look at my test picture: https://www.astrobin.com/c09w8x/B .

And please please share more picture also taken through the scope :)

 

CS


  • eros312, denis0007dl and dcornelis like this

#8 dan_1984

dan_1984

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2016
  • Loc: Europe

Posted 28 August 2020 - 06:16 AM

I got a break last night from clouds and I was able to perform visual first-light with the new CFF 200mm F6.5 refractor.  Bottom-line:  WOW!   I was able to observe the half moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and some DSO’s.  My last large refractor was a TMB APO 178mm F8 LZOS - was a great instrument, unfortunately I sold it 10 years ago - with great regret.  I have added many superb instruments since then, where I focused on DSO imaging.  As I think about retirement, I decided I wanted a large 200mm refractor with a short focal length.  CFF delivered an excellent 200mm F6.5 refractor and surprisingly out performing my TMB 178 on the planets.

 

I purchased the CFF 200 primarily for DSO imaging - but I also wanted to do some planetary imaging and occasional visual use for outreach (after COVID-19) with local high schools. 

 

Anyway, back to the visual first light initial observations.  I am not an expert visual observer, but I have used enough instruments to appreciate the performance of the CFF 200.  My first target was a +2 magnitude star to perform a quick star test.  Atmospheric conditions cooperated with a lovely in-focus star image displaying a nearly perfect diffraction pattern.  I was pleasantly surprised to see no chromatic aberration for a fast F6.5 scope - I was using a 4mm TMB Planetary eyepiece and a Vernonscope 2” 1/20th wave quartz star diagonal giving a magnification of 325x.

 

I then turned to half moon - I used several different eyepieces (Televue 24mm Panoptic, 9mm Ethos, and 4mm TMB) - the craters were “tac” sharp with much detail.  What really amazed me was the contrast - especially the shadows being very sharp.  It was fun just flying over the moon surface at 325x magnification.  Bad news - I will need now to make another investment into a binoviewer .

 

Next target was Jupiter - the planet showed considerable cloud details and using the 4mm TMB even the moons showed some detail.  Again the high contrast level of detail was clearly evident.  Unfortunately, no “great red spot” visible at the this time.

I then turned to Saturn - again a very sharp and contrasty detail of Saturn’s clouds and the rings were tac sharp.  Since Saturn takes magnification well I added a 2X Barlow to 4mm TMB eyepiece to see how well the CFF 200 takes magnification (650x) - there was little break down of Saturn - a real testament of the optical design.

 

Clouds were beginning to roll in so I decided to look at a few DSOs: M57 and then M13.  M13 was stunningly resolved in my 24mm Panaoptic.  The field of view using the 22mm Panoptic was around 1.3 degrees providing a great rich-star-field experience.  I hope to try some double stars in the future as well - stay tuned.

In all I am very satisfied with the CFF200 as a great visual scope.  If the weather cooperates this weekend I hope to take some first-light images using my ZWO ASI2600 (APS-C) camera with the supplied CFF 200 field flattener.  I also have a FL PL11002 CCD (Full Frame) camera for future testing as well.

 

Jason

Congrats! Very nice to hear your report. I’m expecting mine in september, can’t wait.



#9 Allan Wade

Allan Wade

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,732
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Newcastle, Australia

Posted 28 August 2020 - 06:44 AM

the craters were “tac” sharp with much detail.  

It's spelt "Tak" grin.gif

 

Great report, and yes, we need photos.


  • 3 i Guy, Jeff B, payner and 1 other like this

#10 garret

garret

    Surveyor 1

  • ****-
  • Posts: 1,640
  • Joined: 26 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Netherlands

Posted 28 August 2020 - 12:21 PM

Available in 1300 and 1600mm focal-length, the F8 version could be mine for less then 21K.

The 203mm F9 TMB sell for $20K 19 years ago!



#11 drprovi57

drprovi57

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Virgina USA

Posted 28 August 2020 - 12:32 PM

Jason, a very nice report.  Big APO's are just such satisfying instruments, especially when permanently mounted.  Big, bright images with easy, sublime detail. 

 

I have a CFF 160 F6.5.  I have termed this instrument a "scope in search of a good bino-viewer" not just because it is "bino-friendly", but also because it is very picky as to what comes after the objective. 

 

After many hours and months of trying out many of the high end viewers, I finally found the perfect match ups (yes, plural viewers).  For low power, I found the Baader Mark V and, especially, the Zeiss 30 mm clear aperture viewer sometimes sold by Denis Levatic.  With its big aperture, the Zeiss allows full use of eyepiece pairs like the TV 24mm Pans, older 35mm and 30 Ultimas, and my favorites, the APM 24mm UFF's, without any vignetting or darkening at the edges of the FOV.  One look at M31, M42, M11, the double cluster, and the other usual suspects, in bino-vision is all you need to knock you out.  

 

For high power viewing of solar system objects and doubles, I found the Zeiss "sharpest" that Denis also sells, combined with the Baader 1.25X and 1.7X GPC's, to be outstanding with these big, fast, APOs.  This viewer uses mirrors after the beam splitter.  I found this configuration viewer has very, very little color and spherical disturbances compared to other viewers at very high power.  Just superb.

 

Enjoy!!

 

Jeff

Jeff appreciate the information on Bino's - I will definitely be adding some additional visual equipment in the near future - thanks!

 

Jason 



#12 drprovi57

drprovi57

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Virgina USA

Posted 28 August 2020 - 12:42 PM

Jason, 

 

What annoys me about this thread is that you are posting some great stuff, but you are not including eye candy. If you think that anyone will get bored with photos of the CFF, you are wrong my friend.

 

Now, get me my drug of choice by posting some photos of that scope!

For those looking for another view of CFF 200 during first light:

 

IMG_0754.jpeg

 

IMG_0755.jpeg

 

Note you can see the Quastar 7 Astro mounted as well - a future comparison..


  • 3 i Guy, Scott99, contrailmaker and 10 others like this

#13 drprovi57

drprovi57

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Virgina USA

Posted 28 August 2020 - 12:56 PM

Available in 1300 and 1600mm focal-length, the F8 version could be mine for less then 21K.

The 203mm F9 TMB sell for $20K 19 years ago!

I also looked at several high-end producers of large APO refractors.  I had three requirements:  1. less than F7 (I have the first, SN 01,  CFF 200 F6.5), 2. can be delivered within 1 year from ordering, 3. and a dedicated field flattener as part of optical design with imaging circle of greater than 55mm.  CFF delivered on all 3 requirements - optical performance (e.g., Strehl Ratio greater than 0.97 - my scope is 0.98 per report) and no chromatic aberration.    Note that for pricing from outside the US, say Germany/Poland you will need to add shipping cost (estimate $1,000 USD) as well as USA import fee (6-8%) of final purchase price - one could quickly add up $2-3K additional cost to the final purchase.   


  • Jeff B, Scott99, R Botero and 1 other like this

#14 salico

salico

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 741
  • Joined: 12 Jul 2016
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 28 August 2020 - 01:02 PM

I also looked at several high-end producers of large APO refractors.  I had three requirements:  1. less than F7 (I have the first, SN 01,  CFF 200 F6.5), 2. can be delivered within 1 year from ordering, 3. and a dedicated field flattener as part of optical design with imaging circle of greater than 55mm.  CFF delivered on all 3 requirements - optical performance (e.g., Strehl Ratio greater than 0.97 - my scope is 0.98 per report) and no chromatic aberration.    Note that for pricing from outside the US, say Germany/Poland you will need to add shipping cost (estimate $1,000 USD) as well as USA import fee (6-8%) of final purchase price - one could quickly add up $2-3K additional cost to the final purchase.   

but still cheaper in the US than the TEC 200 FL?
 



#15 drprovi57

drprovi57

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Virgina USA

Posted 28 August 2020 - 02:34 PM

but still cheaper in the US than the TEC 200 FL?
 

Yes - CFF 200 F8 and F6.5 is about $3000 less than the TEC 200 F8.  I looked at both and decided on CFF based on delivery time and dedicated Field Flattener.  TEC FF is supplied by AP also at a much higher cost.  I am sure the TEC 200 is also a great performer.   The F6.5 version of the CFF 200 was the major shift decider for me - wanted a faster scope for imaging.   What surprised me was how good the CFF 200 F6.5 performed visually - one can get a wide rich-field and then use planetary eyepieces (9mm and 4mm) to obtain lovely views of the planets.  The CFF 200 F6.5 is also shorter and lighter - (about 50 lbs with rings, handle and dovetail) - a single healthy person can place the CFF 200 in the rings without too much difficulty - a transportable large refractor to a dark site.  

 

Jason


  • Paul Morow, fate187, salico and 1 other like this

#16 dan_1984

dan_1984

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2016
  • Loc: Europe

Posted 28 August 2020 - 04:59 PM

Yes - CFF 200 F8 and F6.5 is about $3000 less than the TEC 200 F8.  I looked at both and decided on CFF based on delivery time and dedicated Field Flattener.  TEC FF is supplied by AP also at a much higher cost.  I am sure the TEC 200 is also a great performer.   The F6.5 version of the CFF 200 was the major shift decider for me - wanted a faster scope for imaging.   What surprised me was how good the CFF 200 F6.5 performed visually - one can get a wide rich-field and then use planetary eyepieces (9mm and 4mm) to obtain lovely views of the planets.  The CFF 200 F6.5 is also shorter and lighter - (about 50 lbs with rings, handle and dovetail) - a single healthy person can place the CFF 200 in the rings without too much difficulty - a transportable large refractor to a dark site.  

 

Jason

3000 USD is a reasonable difference between TEC and CFF, but there is 18k euro difference between LzoS 200 and CFF 200. How much quality difference must there be for the Lzos to be 18k more ,I wonder? 


Edited by dan_1984, 28 August 2020 - 05:14 PM.


#17 drprovi57

drprovi57

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Virgina USA

Posted 28 August 2020 - 06:56 PM

3000 USD is a reasonable difference between TEC and CFF, but there is 18k euro difference between LzoS 200 and CFF 200. How much quality difference must there be for the Lzos to be 18k more ,I wonder? 

$18K more for LZOS shocked.gif ... hard to imagine, I must say the CFF 200 and TEC 200 provide close to optical perfection as possible - with a Strehl Ratio of 0.98 can one really see a difference at a higher Strehl Ratio?  



#18 dan_1984

dan_1984

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2016
  • Loc: Europe

Posted 28 August 2020 - 08:57 PM

$18K more for LZOS shocked.gif ... hard to imagine, I must say the CFF 200 and TEC 200 provide close to optical perfection as possible - with a Strehl Ratio of 0.98 can one really see a difference at a higher Strehl Ratio?  

Sad but true smile.gif). From APM website lzos 203 mm  45300 EUR, way overpriced even for an apo. Maybe healthy competition will lower their price, if not their loss.

https://www.apm-tele...=false&info=610


Edited by dan_1984, 28 August 2020 - 09:05 PM.


#19 Suavi

Suavi

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 538
  • Joined: 05 May 2017
  • Loc: 20.25 deg South of the Equator

Posted 28 August 2020 - 11:45 PM

Thank you Jason for sharing your impressions from the first visual session. It seems to be a keeper waytogo.gif



#20 dan_1984

dan_1984

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2016
  • Loc: Europe

Posted 29 August 2020 - 03:57 AM

The pics are amazing. Perfect 8 inch scope. 



#21 3 i Guy

3 i Guy

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 519
  • Joined: 23 Sep 2005
  • Loc: Blanket, Texas

Posted 29 August 2020 - 06:10 AM

3000 USD is a reasonable difference between TEC and CFF, but there is 18k euro difference between LzoS 200 and CFF 200. How much quality difference must there be for the Lzos to be 18k more ,I wonder? 

The Tec 200 doesn’t come with a beautiful, sturdy case like the CFF so it’s probably closer to $4000 difference. That’s an impressive packing job by Catalin, congrats Jason!
 


  • salico and gozer like this

#22 dan_1984

dan_1984

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2016
  • Loc: Europe

Posted 16 September 2020 - 03:36 AM

I got a break last night from clouds and I was able to perform visual first-light with the new CFF 200mm F6.5 refractor.  Bottom-line:  WOW!   I was able to observe the half moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and some DSO’s.  My last large refractor was a TMB APO 178mm F8 LZOS - was a great instrument, unfortunately I sold it 10 years ago - with great regret.  I have added many superb instruments since then, where I focused on DSO imaging.  As I think about retirement, I decided I wanted a large 200mm refractor with a short focal length.  CFF delivered an excellent 200mm F6.5 refractor and surprisingly out performing my TMB 178 on the planets.

 

I purchased the CFF 200 primarily for DSO imaging - but I also wanted to do some planetary imaging and occasional visual use for outreach (after COVID-19) with local high schools. 

 

Anyway, back to the visual first light initial observations.  I am not an expert visual observer, but I have used enough instruments to appreciate the performance of the CFF 200.  My first target was a +2 magnitude star to perform a quick star test.  Atmospheric conditions cooperated with a lovely in-focus star image displaying a nearly perfect diffraction pattern.  I was pleasantly surprised to see no chromatic aberration for a fast F6.5 scope - I was using a 4mm TMB Planetary eyepiece and a Vernonscope 2” 1/20th wave quartz star diagonal giving a magnification of 325x.

 

I then turned to half moon - I used several different eyepieces (Televue 24mm Panoptic, 9mm Ethos, and 4mm TMB) - the craters were “tac” sharp with much detail.  What really amazed me was the contrast - especially the shadows being very sharp.  It was fun just flying over the moon surface at 325x magnification.  Bad news - I will need now to make another investment into a binoviewer .

 

Next target was Jupiter - the planet showed considerable cloud details and using the 4mm TMB even the moons showed some detail.  Again the high contrast level of detail was clearly evident.  Unfortunately, no “great red spot” visible at the this time.

I then turned to Saturn - again a very sharp and contrasty detail of Saturn’s clouds and the rings were tac sharp.  Since Saturn takes magnification well I added a 2X Barlow to 4mm TMB eyepiece to see how well the CFF 200 takes magnification (650x) - there was little break down of Saturn - a real testament of the optical design.

 

Clouds were beginning to roll in so I decided to look at a few DSOs: M57 and then M13.  M13 was stunningly resolved in my 24mm Panaoptic.  The field of view using the 22mm Panoptic was around 1.3 degrees providing a great rich-star-field experience.  I hope to try some double stars in the future as well - stay tuned.

In all I am very satisfied with the CFF200 as a great visual scope.  If the weather cooperates this weekend I hope to take some first-light images using my ZWO ASI2600 (APS-C) camera with the supplied CFF 200 field flattener.  I also have a FL PL11002 CCD (Full Frame) camera for future testing as well.

 

Jason

Any updates on the scope?



#23 drprovi57

drprovi57

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Virgina USA

Posted 16 September 2020 - 07:44 PM

Not much to update - not very good weather lately and busy at work.  I did order a binoviewer and waiting for it to arrive - looking forward to the visual views of Mars.  With regard to imaging - I did perform some initial image tests with both a CMOS ASP-C and full-frame CCD camera- they look good but I need to refine the FF distance to chip .. the CFF FF appears to be an excellent performer.  I hope to share some images soon.

 

Best

jason


  • R Botero and fate187 like this

#24 dan_1984

dan_1984

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2016
  • Loc: Europe

Posted 16 September 2020 - 10:57 PM

Not much to update - not very good weather lately and busy at work.  I did order a binoviewer and waiting for it to arrive - looking forward to the visual views of Mars.  With regard to imaging - I did perform some initial image tests with both a CMOS ASP-C and full-frame CCD camera- they look good but I need to refine the FF distance to chip .. the CFF FF appears to be an excellent performer.  I hope to share some images soon.

 

Best

jason

If I remeber correctly the distance from the ff to chip is 90 mm, +1 mm for filters?




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics