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Thinking caps on. I need help timing a lunar session

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#1 Tailspin45

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Posted 28 August 2020 - 12:41 PM

A Facebook acquaintance in Melbourne 145ºE and me in San Diego 117ºW want to simultaneously do a live stream session of the moon.

 

(I told someone that by doing this he could see one side of the moon and I could see the other. They nodded knowingly.)

 

Ignoring our latitude, which shouldn't matter, we need to find a time when we both are under night skies and the moon is at a high enough angle to make sure our view isn't blocked by buildings and trees. We're both willing to get up any time of the night if the weather cooperates.

 

With all the online resources and Stellarium, is there any way to find a date and time that will work? Is there a formula we could use.



#2 AstroBrett

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Posted 28 August 2020 - 12:46 PM

Use a map and find the longitude midway between your two locations. When it is midnight there, it will be the optimum time for you both to observe. No calculations required, just a bit of geometry.

 

Brett


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#3 Tailspin45

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Posted 28 August 2020 - 12:50 PM

Use a map and find the longitude midway between your two locations. When it is midnight there, it will be the optimum time for you both to observe. No calculations required, just a bit of geometry.

To quote the famous neurophysiologists, The Three Stooges, "I'm thinkin' but nothin' happens!"

 

The time difference is 19 hours--when it is 9PM there it'll be 4AM here. Just after sunset there, just before sunrise here.

 

We a see a full moon from sunrise to sunset...it's highest at mighnight. So when it's midnight midway between us, they moon will be in the best place for each of us to see it.

 

The simple answer is he should view the full moon just after sunset, I should view it just before sunrise--#5 in the diagram.

 

moonphase2.jpg


Edited by Tailspin45, 28 August 2020 - 01:33 PM.


#4 Tom Glenn

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Posted 28 August 2020 - 01:54 PM

Go to this website:

 

https://www.mooncalc.org/

 

You can find any location on Earth, and set the time and date and it will show you the Moon altitude and azimuth from that location.  You are not confined to just the Full Moon.  Your main difficulty is that the Moon is never going to be high in the sky for both of you at the same time.  It's true that diurnal libration will cause you to see different perspectives on the limb, although the clarity with which you will be able to see this will depend on your viewing conditions, which in turn depend upon the elevation of the Moon above the horizon.  


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